The NFL’s demise may have been greatly exaggerated.

SAJ-99

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The problem is the bidder (Amazon) has no concept of what is value. The shareholders have let it exist for two decades at a ridiculous valuation. When that happens there is no real concept of ROE. In 10yrs maybe genius, maybe stupid. I think all pro sports get this wrong. I will pay $8 each game to watch my fav NFL team, maybe $3 for NHL, NBA, MLB. Today they are so many constraints on time (elk hunting tends to do that) I might only pay for 3 NFL games. But I am the casual fan. You can have my $24 or I can not watch those games. I don’t care that much.
 

VikingsGuy

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The problem is the bidder (Amazon) has no concept of what is value.
For the last 20+ years all the networks have lost money on their NFL packages, but view it as an essential platform to push other programming and bundling advertising across content. Amazon is likely doing the same. Same reason Netflix paid $500,000,000 for Seinfeld series. Same for Olympics. etc. etc.
 

np307

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I kept trying to tell all the people who smugly thought they had killed the NFL by not watching that they weren't going to change anything. Mostly because I had already seen so many principled boycotters who ranted about how dumb the sport was return to watching it because they couldn't live without.
 

MTGamecock

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I think what we are seeing here is that while NFL viewership is down, the overall value of live programming is up. As more and more people turn to streaming and DVRs, people are watching fewer and fewer commercials. I've gotten so used to watching on-demand programming now that I find it incredibly painful to watch a TV show or movie with commercials. But live programming, especially sports programming, brings the old advertising model back into play and I think that ad time is selling at a premium.

As for the NFL, I really couldn't care less about it. I am one of those "casual" fans that really didn't need much of an excuse to turn my attention elsewhere. I am thankful to live in a place where fall afternoons inspire me to _do_ things rather than _watch_ other people do things.
 

Shangobango

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I am one of those "casual" fans that really didn't need much of an excuse to turn my attention elsewhere. I am thankful to live in a place where fall afternoons inspire me to _do_ things rather than _watch_ other people do things.
I am not a casual fan but if wasn’t for “on demand” I would miss a lot of the Saints games that are played during daylight hours. I am stuck looking at a screen and gazing at the outdoors through glass too much during the week to do it on the weekends too.
 

noharleyyet

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I kept trying to tell all the people who smugly thought they had killed the NFL by not watching that they weren't going to change anything. Mostly because I had already seen so many principled boycotters who ranted about how dumb the sport was return to watching it because they couldn't live without.

This also deserves a bravo....
 

SAJ-99

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For the last 20+ years all the networks have lost money on their NFL packages, but view it as an essential platform to push other programming and bundling advertising across content. Amazon is likely doing the same. Same reason Netflix paid $500,000,000 for Seinfeld series. Same for Olympics. etc. etc.
$500,000,000 for millennials to discover Seinfeld seems like a risky bet. ;)
Again though, Netflix is playing with the same Monopoly money as Amazon.
 
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