Yellowstone wolf population is declining

Coach Chris

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Gr8bawana

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Smith largely blames outbreaks of disease—including distemper, mange and the parvovirus—and packs moving out of the park for the decline.

I think wolves leaving the park is the most likely reason because they certainly have been reported in a lot of areas that never had wolves before.
I dread the day packs establish themselves in NV.
 

wyoboypt

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Well when they eat all the food then their numbers decline too. Don’t plan on seeing much of anything if you’re planning on wasting vacation time in Yellowstone. The wolves ate everything to see except old faithful! Really.
 

BrentD

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Well when they eat all the food then their numbers decline too. Don’t plan on seeing much of anything if you’re planning on wasting vacation time in Yellowstone. The wolves ate everything to see except old faithful! Really.
Funny, but that's not what folks that have been there this spring are saying. I wonder how that could be?
 

mtmiller

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Well when they eat all the food then their numbers decline too. Don’t plan on seeing much of anything if you’re planning on wasting vacation time in Yellowstone. The wolves ate everything to see except old faithful! Really.
I wish they would eat those damn road bison. No shortage of them. Maybe they will switch diets to those buffets unloading from buses everywhere in the Park.:whistle:
 

Sytes

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Good write-up.
Ecosystem is pretty fickle. Rise and fall. Along with disease, etc - I would imagine they are not really the sort to define their boundaries to the N.P. 😆 As their elk buffet reduces, they spread to keep their tasty treats in focus.

Must be coincidence...






Wolves consume a wide variety of prey, large and small. They efficiently hunt large prey that other predators cannot usually kill. In Yellowstone, 90% of their winter prey is elk; 10–15% of their summer prey is deer. They also kill bison.
From 1995 to 2000, in early winter, elk calves comprised 50% of wolf prey, and bull elk comprised 25%. That ratio reversed from 2001 to 2007, indicating changes in prey vulnerability and availability. The discovery of this change emphasizes the importance of long-term monitoring to understand predator-prey dynamics.
 

coleslaw

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I'm guessing they are just expanding their range mostly. Larger packs kicking out the beta's and forcing them to follow other food sources. I was just in Yellowstone last October- no way are they going to run out of other critters to eat.
 

RobG

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One of my classic bigfoot quality pictures of some wolves on a bison at Slough Creek. They had another one down the next day. With lower elk numbers I wonder if they will target bison more.

(Aside, I’m not a wolf worshipper but my mother wanted to see some this spring.)
 
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