Wild Alaskan Salmon Seafood

Tent Heater

johnnyg08

New member
Joined
Dec 2, 2020
Messages
13
I've read about the Nuways...they're vented so super safe.

Pair it with a couple of CO detectors and you should be ready to rock.
 

2rocky

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2010
Messages
2,733
Big Buddy took the chill off in Northern Nevada in Early Oct in a 12x12 Alaknak. Wasn't worried about venting with the windows open.

But the KniCo Packer wood stove certainly heats the tent up more. You can start the Big Buddy from bed before you get up to light the fire.
 

NickOnTheRun

New member
Joined
Nov 19, 2020
Messages
25
Big Buddy took the chill off in Northern Nevada in Early Oct in a 12x12 Alaknak. Wasn't worried about venting with the windows open.

But the KniCo Packer wood stove certainly heats the tent up more. You can start the Big Buddy from bed before you get up to light the fire.
Sounds dumb.. but I hate the smell of propane heaters. That being said my Mr buddy heaters are the most used in my collection. They're just so easy.
 

twsnow18

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 4, 2013
Messages
1,573
Location
Boise, Idaho
I’ve stayed in alaknaks and traditional canvas wall tents quite a bit. In my opinion, there is not a wood stove out there that works fantastic. They all take consistent tending and most will not have coals for an easy re-start.

Just got back from a December hunt. Lows in the single digits, highs around 25. The buddy heater kicked ass and took the edge off while getting the wood stove goin. I ran the buddy heater for 4 days off of one 20 lb propane tank. It used about 2/3 of the tank. I use 2 CO detectors to be safe.

A76E7356-FB16-4D2E-8381-A6F2993EAF00.jpeg
 

HunterSammieErin23

New member
Joined
Oct 18, 2019
Messages
4
If you are in the high elevations the buddy heaters won't work at all. We struggled last season when there was a fire ban. We have now acquired a small generator and are looking into a gas conversion for our wood stove.
 

OleRedbeard

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2019
Messages
257
Location
Russell Fork River
I have used both in both canvas and nylon over the years and it boils down to a few different factors.
If I am going to be hunting by myself and using my smaller 9x8 Kodiak Canvas tent I run my Mr. Buddy with a hose to a large tank outside and sensor for safety. If I am in my bigger Selkirk I will run the Buddy heater if its not going to get below 20 degrees anything lower and I run the wood stove. With canvas you will not experience much if any condensation running propane. You will however if you use nylon or their derivatives so if you have something like a Alaknak or Guide tent made from Nylon materials you will possibly want to look into a wood stove unless you like water running down the sides and getting on your bag or your gear. You can open vents up and such and cut down on the condensation using propane in nylon tents but its hard to really ever eliminate it which is why I have pretty much exclusively went to canvas tents for any of my camping unless I am backpack hunting which is a whole other ballgame.
Someone pointed out above about high elevation and Mr Buddy heaters and they are correct. I have used the Mr. Buddy up to around 9500 feet with no issues but cannot speak on its performance past that.
Wood stoves are great I love mine and you cant beat the heat they put out or just the satisfaction of them but you'll be feeding them wood all night if you want to maintain the temp even the best need feeding regularly. Its one more chore around camp keeping wood stocked. A couple of 20 pound propane canisters are much easier usually to mess with than hauling in wood or collecting wood every evening which usually consists of hopping in the truck and driving far enough away from where camp is set up to actually find some down timber that hasn't been cut up and used already.



IMG_20201119_215516588_HDR.jpg
 

SFC B

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2013
Messages
3,447
Location
Colorado Springs
If you are going to be in areas with plentiful wood (where we hunt there is TONS of blow down) I will always vote for wood for a few reasons. First, I like to cut firewood. I have no problem coming up a day early, running the saw and splitting wood. Two, I much prefer the dry, radiant heat from a woodstove. Finally is the surety of a wood stove. As long as you have wood in the area and a means to cut it ( and I always bring axes and a hand saw as backups) you have a pretty unlimited supply of heat. That being said, I also don't understand folks that try to run heat of any kind all night. That is what good sleeping bags are for. We have tinder prepositioned for each morning and load the stove before lights out. I am usually the first one up in the morning as the latrine and I have a standing appointment. I light the stove before I head to the potty and get back in the bag for about 15 minutes .....then all is toasty. Here are gratuitous firewood pics from 3rd season. :)
 

Attachments

  • 20201105_135733.jpg
    20201105_135733.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 5

Paul from Colorado

New member
Joined
Dec 16, 2020
Messages
21
Location
Colorado
Go with both (y), us the Lp to get the chill off in the morning while the wood stove is heating up. Nothing beats the wood stove for drying out your wet cloths, and nothing will make you miserable like wet cloths.
We run the same setup as twsnow18 and its perfect.
Good sleeping bags and even better sleeping pads are a must.

 
SITKA Gear

Forum statistics

Threads
91,703
Messages
1,329,935
Members
28,590
Latest member
High Country Trail
Top