Rifled slug gun recommendation for MA?

wllm1313

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I've never enquired about it, but the fact that there are two separate seasons for these weapons in MA, I would think that you aren't able to use muzzleloader during shotgun season. Obviously you can use archery during all seasons even though there is a separate season for that, but the regulations explicitly say you can use archery for all seasons whereas it doesnt say that for muzzleloader relative to shotgun season. I'd be interested to know if you hear that you can use muzzleloader during shotgun season.
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wllm1313

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@mummel also do you have your LTC for a shotgun?

You don’t need an LTC to own and hunt with a muzzy, you can purchase components out of state and transport into MA legally.

Seems to be lots of confusion about this, here is the 2020 hunting regs, this was also confirmed by the Mass Firearms Bureau.
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Longbow14

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if I were to live in MA again id buy a savage 220, that said where I lived on cape most of the shotgunning was with buckshot (I think)
a pump action Mossberg with the spare slug barrel is a good utilitarian option. probably not as accurate as the dedicated slug options mentioned but for an extra hundred or two you can hunt ducks or bucks.
 

Addicting

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I don’t know much about muzzleloaders. Never even handled one.

Do they make any that use cartridges or that you can load like a normal rifle. I saw a YouTube vid with a model that accepted cartridges vs pouring powder.

MZs just seem so complicated vs a shotgun, but it’s probably because of inexperience. How do you unload the MZ at the end of the day if you didn’t fire your shot?

also, someone asked about hunting conditions. This is northeast tree stand hunting, deep woods, thick brush, maybe 60 yards max shots.

It’s quite simple in its basic form. Not as simple as a shotgun but after your first range day with a muzzleloader it is.

To keep it simple buy pellets and a muzzleloader sabot bullet package. Regular shotgun 209 primers and your in business.

Don’t bring a charged Muzzleloader in from the cold. Once I load mine it stays in the truck or barn until it is shot. Condensation from hot cold transition will ruin the charge and you won’t know it until you go to shoot and it doesn’t go off or worse a hang fire. Keep it cold and dry and there isn’t any problems.

Pellets and black powder are very corrosive. Spring for a stainless barrel. Cleaning is very important after it has been charged. Disassemble and use boiling soapy water and a brush, dry and oil. Cleaners don’t do a good enough job and it will be corroded when you get it out again.

BH209 solves most all of those corrosion problems. Buy the proper breach plug and use standard 209 primers. Weighing it by weight verses volume makes it a extremely accurate rifle. Once you made the switch you will never go back to black powder or pellets. Beats it hands down.

Never use Muzzleloader 209 primers. They are weaker primers and are meant for pellets in dry conditions. Regular 209 shotgun primers is all you need and they are cheaper.
 

RobG

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I have a 12 gauge Ithaca Deerslayer. It is good enough at 50 yards with Winchester sabots. It's horrible with Hornaday sabots (like 16" groups) so it is very dependent on ammo.

It kicks like a MF. When sighting it in I support the butt end of the stock with my left hand. It kicks so hard the grip cap smashes into my left hand when I do that. Once it drew blood. (Now I wear a heavy leather glove on my left hand when I sight in.)
 

mummel

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Guys thanks for all the help. I really didn’t like the idea of a muzzleloader although I know it’s the smarter & more cost effective choice.

However, this guys video inspired me.

This looks very doable IMO. I think it’s my unfamiliarity with muzzleloaders that’s put me off them (never even held one), but this design looks manageable.

Questions:

1) What the most user friendly design out there for a muzzle loader. I didn’t know about these break action in line models. These look pretty neat. What is the go-to user friendly design out there?

2) Once loaded, how do I safely store the muzzleloader so that it doesn’t take on moisture WITHOUT firing the shot after every hunt? Do you remove the primer and without the primer the muzzleloader cannot fire? Or the pin (for safety reasons). And how do you avoid moisture while the muzzleloader sits in your truck or basement until the next hunt etc?

Thanks.

UPDATE: Woooahhh what’s the Firestick all about. Just came across this:

 
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1_pointer

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I'd gladly take a slug gun over a ML, just for the convenience and ease of cleaning. Buy one you'll use for other things; small game, birds, etc. Then get a cantilevered slug barrel. Having the scope attached to the barrel lends it to having a better chance of still being sighted in after swapping barrels.
 

Wallow

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I've owned a bunch of slug gun set ups through the years and have the Savage 220 currently. It's the best of the bunch and I much prefer the 20 gauge over the 12's I've had. I plan to buy another one next year - this time the SS laminated version.
 

wllm1313

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Guys thanks for all the help. I really didn’t like the idea of a muzzleloader although I know it’s the smarter & more cost effective choice.

However, this guys video inspired me.

This looks very doable IMO. I think it’s my unfamiliarity with muzzleloaders that’s put me off them (never even held one), but this design looks manageable.

Questions:

1) What the most user friendly design out there for a muzzle loader. I didn’t know about these break action in line models. These look pretty neat. What is the go-to user friendly design out there?

2) Once loaded, how do I safely store the muzzleloader so that it doesn’t take on moisture WITHOUT firing the shot after every hunt? Do you remove the primer and without the primer the muzzleloader cannot fire? Or the pin (for safety reasons). And how do you avoid moisture while the muzzleloader sits in your truck or basement until the next hunt etc?

Thanks.

UPDATE: Woooahhh what’s the Firestick all about. Just came across this:

1. Basically a muzzy where the breach plug is easily removable, I have a knight you have to use channel locks to remove the plug. It’s annoying but not a deal breaker. The other ease thing is which powder you use, real black powder is a mess, huge clean up every time you shoot, 209 is apparently better I haven’t had enough experience yet to know, I gather some stuff is basically smokeless and really clean... though not legal in the west?

2. It’s easy to remove the cap just do that. Compared to rifles I think muzzies are extremely safe. My knight has two safeties, a tradition trigger safety and then a secondary safety on the firing mechanism.

As far as moisture I just put a piece of tape over the barrel, if I’m hiking in rain or snow I use a rifle cover.

Unless you have the budget to buy 2 guns seems like a no brainer to get a muzzy and then be able to hunt the full 4 weeks of gun season. Also I think $500 gets you a lot more accuracy that it does with a shotgun. Just my 2 cents.
 

Slam

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Questions:

1) What the most user friendly design out there for a muzzle loader. I didn’t know about these break action in line models. These look pretty neat. What is the go-to user friendly design out there? Inline with easy removal of the breech plug. Do your research.

2) Once loaded, how do I safely store the muzzleloader so that it doesn’t take on moisture WITHOUT firing the shot after every hunt? Do you remove the primer and without the primer the muzzleloader cannot fire? Or the pin (for safety reasons). And how do you avoid moisture while the muzzleloader sits in your truck or basement until the next hunt etc? Yes on removing the primer. Moisture, aside from the obvious of not allowing the muzzle to face up in rain the biggest culprit is condensation. If its cold outside you don't want to be taking the rifle in and out of warm and cold environments.
 

David5155

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Oct 11, 2020
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I would definitely say you get more bang for your buck with a muzzy. You can get in to one of the cva wolf's kits for under 300. My wife shoots a cva kit like that she got 16 years ago and it's a tack driver, still using original cheap scope that came on it. You'll probably spend a little more figuring out What load to use for a muzzy over a slug gun but once you get them dialed in the great. Nothing better that the excitement of waiting that smoke to clear after the shot to.
 

mummel

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Jun 4, 2019
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Great info guys thank you.

What about the Nitrofire + Firestick. Anymore info on that setup. Looks EXTREMELY easy to use.
 

David5155

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Looks like it could be a sweet set up but from how I understand it loads like a single shot shot gun so I would check you states regs if you want to use it for both firearmsan and MZ season I believe hear for MZ season the gun must load from the muzzle of the barrel or end of barrel.
 

Lrhxr9

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Hartsburg, Missouri
I purchased a browning gold with the cantilevered rifled barrel. So far i have 100% been unimpressed with how the 2 different slugs have shot and with their performance on deer. It is hands down 100 yds and in. My muzzy on the other hand shoots great and cleans fairly easily. My in laws have had great luck accuracy wise with the winchester partition gold slugs in their rem 1100s. I think it is even more imperative that you find the right ammo for a slug gun than it is with a rifle. The two slugs ive shot out of my gold are the remington accutips and winchester deer season copper impacts.
 

EKYHunter

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Dec 13, 2020
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Get a Savage 220 and never look back. I got one 2 years ago and it shoots better than a lot of rifles. Slug guns are my favorite firearm for deer hunting even though I own several rifles. Shoot whatever Ammo the owners manual recommends (not the same for each gun) and you will be pleased. Cure that sticky bolt by ordering and installing the Savage Tactial Bolt from MidwayUSA. I’d have no issue shooting a deer at 200 yards with mine. The new ones even have the Accustock. Here’s a KY buck I killed with my 220 using 3” Accutips. Oh, there’s no need for a 12 gauge with these 20’s available. 5CFC82AF-C1F9-40C4-81F1-2996088AE2FC.jpeg
 

mplane72

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Iowa
If you're not going to hunt muzzy season buy a shot gun. If you're not going to be hunting in deer drives buy the savage. If you're going to get a pump or auto loader and think you'll ever use it for birds, especially waterfowl, buy a 12 ga. If it's going to be a dedicated slug gun I'd go 20ga. If you want a scope get a cantilevered barrel.

Only really good reason to get a muzzy is to hunt muzzy season. Unless you're going to really get into it a shotgun is just a better choice.

From what I hear about Mass I doubt they'll be allowing straight walls like a lot of other shotgun states are.
 

utah400elk

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Sterling, VA
I have a 20 gauge savage bolt action (don’t remember the model number) and it’s a tack driver.

I also just got a Benelli M2 with rifled barrel. Wanted an M2 for all types of hinting and thought the rifled barrel will be nice
 

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