In other wolf news

shb

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2018
Messages
275
Gardiner naturalist and biologist Nathan Varley, who runs the Yellowstone Wolf Tracker guiding service, said skittish wolves are his biggest concern and a worst-case scenario for his business.

“Wolves that survive hunting events, they quickly learn that there’s survival value in avoiding humans,” Varley said. “And we’ve relied extensively on wolves that do not have that













Hold on, we'll get ya a whambulance.
 

rogerthat

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2015
Messages
623
Maybe he can apply for funds to cover his losses like ranchers do
Heck, not just ranchers, cares act / ppp. It’s the American way. Heck you only need to think you might have losses or a company
 

Sytes

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 25, 2009
Messages
10,168
Location
Montana
Hmmm...

“We have multiple females pregnant in at least two packs — Junction and Wapiti — that could be due to the mortality that we’ve experienced,” Smith said. “It’s broken apart the social structure, it’s messed with the hierarchy, and it’s actually produced more pups. Now this is a hypothesis, but this is what I would call an artificial stimulation of wolf reproductive capacity. By going in and killing them, you stimulate reproduction.”

So, in a nutshell, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming "80%" of wolf deaths are attributed to humans thus, wolf hunters and trappers have single handedly significantly increased the Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana wolf population - per the theorized basis in the article. ;)
 

hossblur

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 15, 2012
Messages
722
Hmmm...

“We have multiple females pregnant in at least two packs — Junction and Wapiti — that could be due to the mortality that we’ve experienced,” Smith said. “It’s broken apart the social structure, it’s messed with the hierarchy, and it’s actually produced more pups. Now this is a hypothesis, but this is what I would call an artificial stimulation of wolf reproductive capacity. By going in and killing them, you stimulate reproduction.”

So, in a nutshell, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming "80%" of wolf deaths are attributed to humans thus, wolf hunters and trappers have single handedly significantly increased the Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana wolf population - per the theorized basis in the article. ;)
Read same theory in regards to coyote expansion as well
 

FI460

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 22, 2018
Messages
740
Location
Ashland, OR
Didn’t they already document multiple females with pups within the same pack after reintroduction in the 90’s?

It was covered extensively back in the 90s. American Wolf talks about one pack that ended up at like 28 wolves. I think it may have been the Mollie's.

It happens with wolves. I don’t believe it's the same as the compensative pup increase in coyotes though.
 

MTTW

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
489
Location
Montana
I think we might have to wait and count the wolves, because pregnant females don't equal more wolves necessarily. In the study that I remember many packs still only raise one litter.
Doug Smith isn't likely to tell you that.

If it increases the wolf population then they should be all for it, but they are not all for it. Which leads me to believe what I believed before their last spin session.
 

SAJ-99

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 5, 2019
Messages
2,369
Location
E Washington
Hmmm...

“We have multiple females pregnant in at least two packs — Junction and Wapiti — that could be due to the mortality that we’ve experienced,” Smith said. “It’s broken apart the social structure, it’s messed with the hierarchy, and it’s actually produced more pups. Now this is a hypothesis, but this is what I would call an artificial stimulation of wolf reproductive capacity. By going in and killing them, you stimulate reproduction.”

So, in a nutshell, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming "80%" of wolf deaths are attributed to humans thus, wolf hunters and trappers have single handedly significantly increased the Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana wolf population - per the theorized basis in the article. ;)
Would that theory surprise you if true? I see it as unintended consequences. We have seen these types of effects often.
 

Sytes

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 25, 2009
Messages
10,168
Location
Montana
I'll take, "truth" over theory any day. Might support my belief there are 14 million woofs in Montana... if true. ;)
 

SAJ-99

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 5, 2019
Messages
2,369
Location
E Washington
I'll take, "truth" over theory any day. Might support my belief there are 14 million woofs in Montana... if true. ;)
But it is hard data..."The custom is reflected in 27 years of hard data: 85% of the time, park packs produce single litters.". The conclusion is not a robust scientific study over a two decades but it should make you curious.

These days people seem to want their "truth" more than the Truth.
 

MTTW

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
489
Location
Montana

"Turnover among primary males may occur through natural mortality or by exploitation by humans. Low exploitation rates by hunting and trapping therefore may contribute to multiple litters if alpha males are removed and other pack members remain. This change in social structure could conceivably increase reproductive output of a wolf population sufficient to offset population declines from human exploitation."
 
Top