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How far for a 10" steel target?

2rocky

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Couple questions....

How far away can a good hunter consistently ring a 10" steel target with a hunting rifle?

How close can you shoot one of these with a pistol (.38) safely?
 

SnowyMountaineer

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Couple questions....

How far away can a good hunter consistently ring a 10" steel target with a hunting rifle?
With relatively cheap rifles being decent now, and user friendly optics, I think 1.5 MOA off of a bipod in the field is an achievable benchmark for 90%+ of hunters in the absence of wind. Back it off a bit for noise and that's ballpark 550-600 yds on a 10" plate. For most starting from scratch, that will require a fair bit of practice, but we're talking about a "good hunter", so that seems fair.

Even though you're talking shooting, not hunting, to me a good hunter would probably be able to make that happen with their equipment if they want to IMO; even if they never shoot past 200 or 300 yds on game. And many good hunters would probably be able to do it with just a little coaching, even if they aren't that interested or don't find it useful for how they hunt.

Obviously this is purely an opinion.
 

SnowyMountaineer

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And before someone who can't hit a plate 10/10 at 550 on a windless day yells at me because they're a good hunter, I'm sure you are (likely better than me), and with a little rifle tinkering and specific practice I'd bet you could do it.
 

EastTNHunter

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For the pistol… wear eye protection.

I know, many will say to wear protection for the rifle as well
 
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noharleyyet

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Good hunters shoot accurately from field shooting positions, and get close enough to cleanly dispatch game. Marksmanship and hunting are not the same set of skills.
Probably accurate but most good hunters possess both. Doping and rest improvisation are usually in the back of my mind in the mountains.

*not implying that I'm a good hunter, far from it.
 
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PorterHouse

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A lot of factors on how far and how consistently one should be able to ring that plate with their rifle. The range I shoot at has 8” at 300 and 12” at 400 yards and I’m not having a good day if I’m not keeping my shots on those gongs at those distances.

As for pistol shooting, generally the recommendation is to stay at least 10 yards away if I remember correctly. That’s not out of concern for the plate but more so out of concern for the shooter (splash back). As others have mentioned, always wear eye protection when shooting steel at pistol distances.
 

MinnesotaHunter

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At risk of not exactly answering the question, I would offer the following points:

1. There is a difference between being a good hunter versus rifleman, but the latter skill can make the former more efficient.

2. A hunter is going to use that plate to determine their effective ranges in various positions, and help keep themselves honest. IE: I won't take a sitting shot beyond 250 because I can't keep them all on the steel beyond that.

3. The rifleman will use the plate to refine their skills (help them gauge their understanding of wind, ballistics, shooting positions, etc). I would argue setting a benchmark that you have to meet to be considered a good rifleman, is maybe something to strive for, but setting a plate at that distance and shooting until you can hit it, is not an efficient method to get there. This would be considered "outcome based training". Effectively, someone pushing you in the deep end until you learn to swim. "Performance based training", gradually increasing the challenge, and allowing yourself to master the task in incrementally harder conditions, will build a better shooter faster.
 

Farmerj

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1.5 MOA on a 10” gong is 1500ish yards.

I’m more concerned with the velocity of the bullet still having the energy and speed to perform and do it’s job.

Pretty much limits most things I shoot to 400 yards or less.

I view the plate as the target for MPBR and need to hit it from any angle. Like a 8 or 10” dodge ball.
 

MinnesotaHunter

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1.5 MOA on a 10” gong is 1500ish yards.

I’m more concerned with the velocity of the bullet still having the energy and speed to perform and do it’s job.

Pretty much limits most things I shoot to 400 yards or less.

I view the plate as the target for MPBR and need to hit it from any angle. Like a 8 or 10” dodge ball.

I think you have some numbers transposed.

If you and your rifle are shooting 1.5 MOA, you will be statistically off the 10" plate at ~667 yards.

At 1500yds, a 1.5 MOA group is ~22.5".
 

elkduds

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I like the bench for variable wringing...If I know the rifle ain't the problem the blame game is down to yours truly.
Yes, the bench is the place to sort out loads and rifle accuracy issues, one variable @ a time. To me that is on the shooting end more than the hunting end of the spectrum. I can see how people w more access to shooting ranges than hunting ground get focused on that. I have to make myself take time away from scouting and hiking to go shooting. I'd be a better shot if I practiced more.
 

JT13

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Average PA hunters? Probably around 150 yards

We give steel at least 15 yards but you always run the risk of catching a piece of lead or jacket
 

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