E-bike Access?

Do you support allowing e-bikes (electric motor assisted) into non-motorized areas?

  • Yes

    Votes: 32 14.2%
  • No

    Votes: 189 84.0%
  • Unsure

    Votes: 4 1.8%

  • Total voters
    225
I know there are several ATV trails that are closed until July 15th for ATV traffic. I've also seen specific high use trails that are seasonally closed to horses until the fall.
 
It's just one more simple dispute over access. Technological innovation leads to ATVs and mountain bikes, and now E bikes. The user groups with the most power win. Usually power is number of participants and the time and inclination to advocate. Mountain bikes were extremely successful. There are a lot of ATV users but they weren't willing to organise and advocate policially. E bikes will get access to most NF. There are too many and the machines cost a lot of money, the industry will push.

The funny part will be when they close places to hunt for being too dangerous with the number of bikes around.

Personally, I view them all pretty much the same. Some dude on a guided hunt and an outfitter in a permanent camp in Wilderness (horses) has ruined my 10 mile pack in more than mountain bikes, mountain bikes are all over in the places I day hunt, full of illegal trails that are now established for decades, if I see E bikes they are welcome to it. I've learned to put up with all types of user groups, those user groups can learn to put up with E bikes.
 
Just saw where quiet kat is making a bike now where you can switch between no assist and classes 1-3, you know so that you can comply with local rules. Of course no one would ever cheat with that type of system or lie about what mode they were using…
 
It's just one more simple dispute over access. Technological innovation leads to ATVs and mountain bikes, and now E bikes. The user groups with the most power win. Usually power is number of participants and the time and inclination to advocate. Mountain bikes were extremely successful. There are a lot of ATV users but they weren't willing to organise and advocate policially. E bikes will get access to most NF. There are too many and the machines cost a lot of money, the industry will push.

The funny part will be when they close places to hunt for being too dangerous with the number of bikes around.

Personally, I view them all pretty much the same. Some dude on a guided hunt and an outfitter in a permanent camp in Wilderness (horses) has ruined my 10 mile pack in more than mountain bikes, mountain bikes are all over in the places I day hunt, full of illegal trails that are now established for decades, if I see E bikes they are welcome to it. I've learned to put up with all types of user groups, those user groups can learn to put up with E bikes.
Hard to be the only group out there willing to follow the regs, but I can't' cheat just because everyone else is. 61 years old and those welts on my butt from 50 years ago still heat up when I'm tempted to.

The flip side being that a motorized trespass citation isn't worth the paper it's written on in terms of consequences. The abusers don't give a damn, and why should they? The regs don't have any teeth.

ATVers seem pretty damned organized in my neighborhood, organized enough to get the NF to say, "You can't go around the gates, but we will spend a fortune of the taxpayers' money to build you a OHV trail system which will give you even better access and impact the animals even more.
 
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Gettin pretty sick of pullin up to a trailhead and EVERY SINGLE truck has an eBike in the back. And out of state plates to boot. Fun though to watch em try.
I have our local Forest Service LEO'S cell number. If I see an E-bike where it doesn't belong I am snapping a picture and making a phone call. mtmuley
 
My state in trying to promote e bike use offered an eleven hundred dollar instant rebate at the point of purchase. You had to apply, there were income guidelines of 80% of median by county but when you live amongst billionaires it's easy, also there was a lottery. Largest company in the US had store in the big city, and another discount of $700 on their most popular bike which they immediately removed four days later but I'd already bought. I paid a couple hundred plus the tax for a bike with large fat tires.

I'll follow the rules while hunting because the fish cops have too much to do already, the rest of the time just because it's part of the deal, live in a society follow the rules, sure do wish the mtn bikers felt the same, illegal trails all over, and the FS uses them too on their own mtn bikes on days off.

Eventually they'll be all over. They allow you to cover a lot more ground than a regular bike without being a motor vehicle. The pressure to allow them will be too much.
 
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Only thing worse than e-bikes in the backcountry where they aren’t supposed to be is broken e bike trailers left strewn out across the backcountry. That pack out sucked. But maybe I’ll sell it when I get the replacement parts. Anyone interested?
 
Elk be all like “that jackass couldn’t possibly be a hunter.” It’s like a tractor blind for flatland whitetail.
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Class 2 ebike with the limiter removed.

Thanks, that's my model. I seldom go at 20 anyway, bike paths, it would be nice though when I'm forced to go on roads. Mtn biking paths I'm often hardly moving as they put them over all kinds of dips and bumps. I'm intent on using it on all those 4wd roads that I never want to take my truck on. I'll give the reprograming a try. Ultimately you are sacrificing distance the faster you go and the less you use the pedals.
 
I'm a bit late to the debate. Let's play devils advocate. Had ebikes never been named ebikes and just pedal assist would the debate be the same? Their potential impact on wilderness access, and how a simple name change might alter the debate.

Pedal-Assist Bikes Bridging the Gap Between Tradition and Technology

Pedal-assist bikes, often referred to as e-bikes, have revolutionized outdoor recreation. These two-wheeled wonders combine human pedaling power with electric assistance, allowing riders to cover more ground, conquer challenging terrain, and experience the great outdoors in new ways. But what if we called them “pedal-assist bikes” instead of “e-bikes”? Would the conversation around their use in backcountry areas change?

The Wilderness Access Conundrum

E-Bikes vs. Traditional Mountain Bikes

  1. Trail Experience:
    • E-Bikes: Pedal-assist bikes enhance the trail experience by making uphill climbs more manageable. Riders can explore farther and tackle longer routes without exhausting themselves.
    • Traditional Mountain Bikes: These rely solely on human power. Riders face physical challenges but enjoy a purist’s connection.
  2. Environmental Impact:
    • E-Bikes: Their electric assistance produce minimal noise and emissions. E-bikes cause less trail erosion than traditional motorized vehicles like ATVs or dirt bikes.
    • Traditional Mountain Bikes: While eco-friendly, they still contribute to trail wear and tear.
  3. Inclusivity:
    • E-Bikes: Pedal-assist technology opens doors for people of varying fitness levels, ages, and abilities. Seniors, those recovering from injuries, and people with disabilities can explore wilderness areas.
    • Traditional Mountain Bikes: Accessibility depends on physical fitness and stamina.

E-Bikes vs. Horses

  1. Noise and Disruption:
    • E-Bikes: e-bikes minimize disturbance to wildlife and other trail users.
    • Horses: Equally quiet but leave behind waste.
    • Helicopters/Airplanes: Noisy and disruptive during rescues or drop off areas.
  2. Trail Impact:
    • E-Bikes: Lighter than horses, e-bikes cause less trail damage.
    • Horses: Hooves can erode trails, especially in wet conditions.
    • Helicopters/Airplanes: Minimal trail impact but require landing zones.
  3. Safety and Speed:
    • E-Bikes: Controlled speeds reduce accidents. E-bike riders can navigate technical sections more efficiently.
    • Horses: Steady but slower.
    • Helicopters: Fastest, but limited to emergencies or money.

The Name Game

  • E-Bikes: The term “e-bike” carries futuristic connotations, sparking debates about technology invading pristine wilderness.
  • Pedal-Assist Bikes: A name change emphasizes their human-powered foundation. It aligns better with traditional biking and reduces the fear of technological disruption.

Conclusion

As we ponder the future of wilderness access, let’s remember that technology evolves. Just as compound bows replaced longbows and black powder gave way to modern firearms, pedal-assist bikes represent progress. Perhaps the debate isn’t about the name but about finding harmony between tradition, innovation, and responsible stewardship of our wild places.

So, whether you’re riding an e-bike, a traditional mountain bike, or hunting with a bow, let’s cherish the outdoors and advocate for its preservation—no matter the name we give our wheels or weapons. At some point the hair splitting has got to stop. Just my thoughts.
 
I'm a bit late to the debate. Let's play devils advocate. Had ebikes never been named ebikes and just pedal assist would the debate be the same? Their potential impact on wilderness access, and how a simple name change might alter the debate.

Pedal-Assist Bikes Bridging the Gap Between Tradition and Technology

Pedal-assist bikes, often referred to as e-bikes, have revolutionized outdoor recreation. These two-wheeled wonders combine human pedaling power with electric assistance, allowing riders to cover more ground, conquer challenging terrain, and experience the great outdoors in new ways. But what if we called them “pedal-assist bikes” instead of “e-bikes”? Would the conversation around their use in backcountry areas change?

The Wilderness Access Conundrum

E-Bikes vs. Traditional Mountain Bikes

  1. Trail Experience:
    • E-Bikes: Pedal-assist bikes enhance the trail experience by making uphill climbs more manageable. Riders can explore farther and tackle longer routes without exhausting themselves.
    • Traditional Mountain Bikes: These rely solely on human power. Riders face physical challenges but enjoy a purist’s connection.
  2. Environmental Impact:
    • E-Bikes: Their electric assistance produce minimal noise and emissions. E-bikes cause less trail erosion than traditional motorized vehicles like ATVs or dirt bikes.
    • Traditional Mountain Bikes: While eco-friendly, they still contribute to trail wear and tear.
  3. Inclusivity:
    • E-Bikes: Pedal-assist technology opens doors for people of varying fitness levels, ages, and abilities. Seniors, those recovering from injuries, and people with disabilities can explore wilderness areas.
    • Traditional Mountain Bikes: Accessibility depends on physical fitness and stamina.

E-Bikes vs. Horses

  1. Noise and Disruption:
    • E-Bikes: e-bikes minimize disturbance to wildlife and other trail users.
    • Horses: Equally quiet but leave behind waste.
    • Helicopters/Airplanes: Noisy and disruptive during rescues or drop off areas.
  2. Trail Impact:
    • E-Bikes: Lighter than horses, e-bikes cause less trail damage.
    • Horses: Hooves can erode trails, especially in wet conditions.
    • Helicopters/Airplanes: Minimal trail impact but require landing zones.
  3. Safety and Speed:
    • E-Bikes: Controlled speeds reduce accidents. E-bike riders can navigate technical sections more efficiently.
    • Horses: Steady but slower.
    • Helicopters: Fastest, but limited to emergencies or money.

The Name Game

  • E-Bikes: The term “e-bike” carries futuristic connotations, sparking debates about technology invading pristine wilderness.
  • Pedal-Assist Bikes: A name change emphasizes their human-powered foundation. It aligns better with traditional biking and reduces the fear of technological disruption.

Conclusion

As we ponder the future of wilderness access, let’s remember that technology evolves. Just as compound bows replaced longbows and black powder gave way to modern firearms, pedal-assist bikes represent progress. Perhaps the debate isn’t about the name but about finding harmony between tradition, innovation, and responsible stewardship of our wild places.

So, whether you’re riding an e-bike, a traditional mountain bike, or hunting with a bow, let’s cherish the outdoors and advocate for its preservation—no matter the name we give our wheels or weapons. At some point the hair splitting has got to stop. Just my thoughts.
Which eBike company do you have a business relationship with?
 

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