What aren’t low recoil cartridges more popular?

mummel

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I learned today that Remington has discontinued all their caliber lines except for the 30-30.

Hornady makes a couple, but I could only find a single SKU for the .308.

What aren’t these low recoil ammo options not selling well? To me they seem like a no-brainer, giving you the option to scale lower for deer, and use larger grains for elk.

What am I missing? Thanks.
 

Boomerusaf

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Why are you so concerned about the recoil? You emphasized the importance of it but didn't explain why.

There are many ways to mitigate recoil. Wear a heavy shirt and/or use a recoil pad to name the easiest. I can count on one hand where I noticed recoil after shooting at an animal. Usually, you're adrenaline is pumping and you wouldn't feel a kick from a mule.
 

Marshian

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I assume the low recoil doesn’t sell as well because it would require resighting in your scope. A lot of people get a load they are happy with and don’t want to change anything once they are set up. And then buy a smaller, less recoiling rifle in a different caliber if they want to shoot for pleasure or other reasons.
 

wllm1313

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I assume the low recoil doesn’t sell as well because it would require resighting in your scope. A lot of people get a load they are happy with and don’t want to change anything once they are set up. And then buy a smaller, less recoiling rifle in a different caliber if they want to shoot for pleasure or other reasons.
Adding on to this, if your going to scale down you can always go to a lighter bullet instead of a reduced powder charge.

I’m a reloading novice, but I’ve found my rifle shoots like crap if it’s not loaded to the max, I guessing there is a sweet spot for most calibers and manufacturers only want to load the most accurate load for each caliber + bullet weight and type.
 

Carl 9.3x62

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I've only shot the reduced recoil loads from hornady in my 270. Didn't really notice much of a change in felt recoil, but they weren't as accurate as the superformance rounds.
 

Greyman

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I use reduced recoil rounds in my 7mag. I prefer The Hornady Custom Lite. The ballistics end up being identical to a 7mm-08. All I need for deer, hogs, and antelope. I reserve the full power rounds for nilgai and elk sized critters. Less recoil, less muzzle blast, doesn't burn out my barrel as fast, and makes nice cloverleafs in my rifle at 100 yards.
I saw that Hornady is discontinuing that ammo so I stocked up. Academy still has some online.
 

mummel

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Why are you so concerned about the recoil? You emphasized the importance of it but didn't explain why.

There are many ways to mitigate recoil. Wear a heavy shirt and/or use a recoil pad to name the easiest. I can count on one hand where I noticed recoil after shooting at an animal. Usually, you're adrenaline is pumping and you wouldn't feel a kick from a mule.
Injury suffered as a kid. Needed to be glued up after the recoil of a scope. Still have a nasty scar to show for it. Haven’t shot since.

But that was decades ago. I’m sure it’s not a big deal now. However, currently more of a philosophical thing for me (ie don’t bring a cannon to a knife fight).
 

mummel

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I assume the low recoil doesn’t sell as well because it would require resighting in your scope. A lot of people get a load they are happy with and don’t want to change anything once they are set up. And then buy a smaller, less recoiling rifle in a different caliber if they want to shoot for pleasure or other reasons.
Remington claims no resighting necessary and guarantees the same performance up to 200 yards. How many guys really shoot more than 200 say for deer hunting.

It makes sense to me that these low recoil cartridges should have a strong position in the marketplace, but most companies are discontinuing the lines. I’m left wondering why.
 

mummel

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I use reduced recoil rounds in my 7mag. I prefer The Hornady Custom Lite. The ballistics end up being identical to a 7mm-08. All I need for deer, hogs, and antelope. I reserve the full power rounds for nilgai and elk sized critters. Less recoil, less muzzle blast, doesn't burn out my barrel as fast, and makes nice cloverleafs in my rifle at 100 yards.
I saw that Hornady is discontinuing that ammo so I stocked up. Academy still has some online.
Exactly this. Makes so much sense. But again, Hornady discontinued the lines?
 

Boomerusaf

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Injury suffered as a kid. Needed to be glued up after the recoil of a scope. Still have a nasty scar to show for it. Haven’t shot since.

But that was decades ago. I’m sure it’s not a big deal now. However, currently more of a philosophical thing for me (ie don’t bring a cannon to a knife fight).
Getting "scoped" is a technique issue more than it is a recoil issue. I dare to say more than 50% of hunters on here have been scoped before. That's a solvable issue! Hold that stock as tight to your shoulder as possible and it will never happen.

When I killed my first deer, my Dad walked up to me concerned because I had blood running down my face from the scope getting me. 15 years later and a Lot of shooting, it has never happened since.
 

VikingsGuy

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Getting comfortable with shooting centerfire rifles in general, and getting proper fit of stock and eye relief on scope takes care of recoil concerns for the vast majority of hunters for .308 and below. If you go over .308 then you are chasing power/velocity, so typically looking for hot loads more than slow loads. As a result it is a beginners/kids market which apparently doesn't warrant the product line.

I have said on your other threads -- focus on learning to properly mount and shoot a decent fitting naturally low recoil rifle (.223 or .243) and then work your way up. If you are really skitish do a bunch of dry firing to get a little comfort pulling the trigger. Shortcuts like low recoil ammo or braking a 7mm08 will not serve you well over time in my opinion.
 

1_pointer

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Adding on to this, if your going to scale down you can always go to a lighter bullet instead of a reduced powder charge.

I’m a reloading novice, but I’ve found my rifle shoots like crap if it’s not loaded to the max, I guessing there is a sweet spot for most calibers and manufacturers only want to load the most accurate load for each caliber + bullet weight and type.
A tidbit I've learned from an outdoor writer is that the powder charge weight has a large influence on recoil as well. I know in my 338 the 72gr H4350 load kicks a lot more than the 65gr R15 load with all the other components being the same and I'm giving up, at most, 100fps...

To the OP, getting scoped is easily mitigated by stock fit and proper mounting of a scope with plenty of eye relief.
 

Greyman

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Exactly this. Makes so much sense. But again, Hornady discontinued the lines?
Yes, unfortunately. I really like the idea of hunting with one rifle that I know like the back of my hand. Another advantage is less meat damage.
I guess there's a small segment of the population that enjoys being kicked in the nuts by redheaded women. Not really my cup of tea and neither is having the snot kicked out of me during a day at the range. EVERYONE shoots better with reduced recoil and muzzle blast, I don't care what they might tell you.
 

mummel

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Yes, unfortunately. I really like the idea of hunting with one rifle that I know like the back of my hand. Another advantage is less meat damage.
I guess there's a small segment of the population that enjoys being kicked in the nuts by redheaded women. Not really my cup of tea and neither is having the snot kicked out of me during a day at the range. EVERYONE shoots better with reduced recoil and muzzle blast, I don't care what they might tell you.
Meat damage is an excellent point too. You can scale your grains dependent on what you're harvesting.
 

rmauch20

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For Pete sake man! You seem to be super worried about recoil. As others have recommended go get a 223 bolt gun and try to shoot a barrel out of it.

After you master that move up to a .243, 6.5 Creedmoor, 6.5 PRC, or 7mm-08 and go hunt.
 

wllm1313

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To the OP, getting scoped is easily mitigated by stock fit and proper mounting of a scope with plenty of eye relief.
Yep... although sometimes it's unavoidable in real hunting situations. If you've hunted long enough in the mountains you've taken a shot were going into in you knew it was gonna sting.
 
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