Shooting Sticks or Bi-pod?

tzone

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Since I've been hunting other areas the last few years besides MN and WI my shot opportunities have been more than the 50-75 yards offered there. Last year the area in the SD, Black Hills was offering shots to about the 300 mark. I practiced a bit with a single, Primos Trigger Stick. It was the singe stick. My son and I both shot off of it and agreed, neither of us liked it.

I used a Bog-pod tripod a bit last year on one of the spots. I ended up shooting my buck at 60 yds off hand. lol But...the bog pod was MUCH more stable than the trigger stick. I would have no issues out to 300 with it. Probably further.

What do you guys like?
 

Ajax2744

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I can pretty quickly loop my trekking pole straps together and make shooting sticks. I do hunt with a guy that uses on of the primos walking/shooting sticks that he likes a lot.
 

tzone

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I can pretty quickly loop my trekking pole straps together and make shooting sticks. I do hunt with a guy that uses on of the primos walking/shooting sticks that he likes a lot.
I like the concept, not the pole. I think the bi-pod version would be a lot better.
 

VAspeedgoat

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I like shooting sticks. Small light and I never know they're there if I don't want them. I typically keep mine in a small loop on my packs waist belt. I also like them to prop on when I'm glassing for long periods. I find them almost as quick and easy to deploy as a bipod or trigger stick without them being so cumbersome.

Like has already been mentioned, I will just use hiking sticks if I have them.
 

NEWHunter

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Brookfield, WI
I agree with your monopod assessment, I’m not a huge fan, but they are better than nothing.

I started using a bipod here in WI about 10 years ago. Took a buck at at 330 yards from a standing position and that was really pushing it. I take it with me pretty much all the time as it doubles as a walking stick/trekking pole. And it’s ready to go almost immediately, which has been a difference maker for me in the past. The only reason I haven’t seriously considered moving up to a tripod is the cost.

The bipod was extremely handy antelope hunting last year as well. As I mentioned, it doubled as a trekking pole, and I took another standing shot off of it to take my buck at 225. Wouldn’t have taken or made the shot without it - prone and sitting were not options.

About five years ago I added a Caldwell Field Pod to my gear list as well. Anytime I will be stand hunting (in WI) it comes with me and especially if I have a youth or disabled hunter along. The things are an amazing value. I wouldn’t hesitate to shoot 400 yards off of it. Also it’s a great way to keep the gun at the ready, keep movement to a minimum, and keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction (especially helpful with kids in the blind). I’ve used it for turkey, deer, and bears with rifles, shotguns, and crossbow. I’m going to bring it antelope hunting this year too - just in case and for my Dad who is disabled.

How was you hunt in the Black Hills? I have two points and I’m debating applying this year.
 
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Ajax2744

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I like the concept, not the pole. I think the bi-pod version would be a lot better.
I agree. He tends to like it but it's not for me. I like two points of contact on the ground. Makes it a little more stable. Which is why I use my trekking poles as a bipod.
 

Walkathon

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I'm not a fan of the mono pod either. My choice is bipod, then bog pod (tri-pod) or prone on a backpack works if you're view isn't obstructed. Depends on the terrain.
 

BucksnDucks

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This gets talked about frequently and really depends on the type of hunting you are doing, terrain, cover, shot distance, etc.. What I have found as far as stability is the more points of contacted to the earth the more stable.
Mono pod is generally better than nothing (1 contact)
Bipod sticks are better than mono pod (2 contact)
Bipod sticks with a mono pod equals tri pod, better (3 contact)
Attached bipod with prone shooter give or take better than tripod
Attached bipod with rear support hard to beat ( 3 contact and prone shooter)
Prone off a pack is excellent choice but carries more variables and less ability to adjust height
Recently I've had success off tripod (QD scope and replace with shooting rest) and using shooting sticks supported with a trekking pole with shooting rest attached.
 

tzone

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How was you hunt in the Black Hills? I have two points and I’m debating applying this year.
I loved the hunt. It was a bucket list item for me. There is a good chance I’ll be able to go this year in west river.

Coming from hunting northern WI and MN the deer sightings were crazy compared to what I’m used to. And I ended up getting a nice 4x4.
 

HiMtnHntr

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Wyoming
In open country, nothing much beats a bipod. Sometimes you can't use it, but dang, when you can, it's the cat's pajamas. I carry a pair of shooting sticks in the truck and use them from time to time in areas that don't allow for a prone shot, but they aren't as steady as the bipod.
 

hank4elk

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I have used a walking stick with yoke,hiking poles, shooting sticks & a tripod.
Never liked the weight of bi-pod on my rifle,but they are handy at times.
I still carry my shooting sticks some days, but more likely to have my tripod with me now. I can shoot pretty well a long ways off it sitting. It usually gets me up out of the grass that can be a problem prone. It makes glassing a breeze
 

cahunter805

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I run a swivel Harris bipod. If you’re going to be using a bipod get a swivel for sure. Much easier to get setup especially on uneven terrain.
 

Yellowstoner

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I have an attached bipod as well as tri-pod shooting sticks (the primos jim shockey ones). It's far too heavy for what I like to carry around, though it does double as a scope/bino tripod which is okay. It rarely comes along with me - if you decide to go that route PM me and I'd give you a smoking deal on them.
 

std7mag

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central pa
The area where i hunt ranges from thick woods (25 yards) to open woods (100-200 yards) to the open gas lines (1,500 yards).

In the woods i typically shoot standing and use a tree. I practice at the range using one of the uprights for the roof. Accurate enough to 300 yards.

Along the gas lines, depending on how tall the grass is i'll either use me pack in the prone (grass short) or use a small fold up seat with the pack on it. Plop my butt on the ground and have an improvised bench rest. (Perfect placement on deer just over 400 yards).

I prefer not to be lugging around the added weight of a bipod when i don't have to.
Ounces equal pounds the further from the truck you go.
 
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