Proper Meat Care for Antelope

cgarner

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Aug 23, 2016
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597
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CA
Kill it, cool it in whichever manner blows your skirt up, eat it and enjoy.
 

hillstone

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Mar 1, 2016
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I seen Randy stress this in his videos yet I see hunters carrying a freshly harvested antelope around in the backs of their pickups. Antelope that has been resting has a high internal body temperature of 101.84 degrees Farenheight. That temperature rises when they are running. Antelope have the ability to raise and lower temperature by raising and lowering the hairs on their bodies. So those temperatures are very damaging to the meat on a carcass being carried in a pickup bed.

Antelope really should be quartered and/or deboned and the meat put in coolers full of ice. You really want to cool antelope immediately. Get the hide off as fast as possible, quarter it out and get it cooled. I use large cookers full of soda bottles that I filled full of water and froze. Place the ice on top of the meat with the drain plug open. Those of you who wondered why your antelope tastes so strong, this is usually why.

The other reason antelope tastes strong is when they are running, a hormone called epinephrine, commonly known as Adrenalin is secreted into antelope blood and helps to increase blood flow and oxygen retention. This is why antelope can run for such long distances. I prefer to shoot a rested antelope. I will never shoot an antelope that has been run hard. Just my preference. I like to ambush antelope in their bed. Some call that not sporty. I call that smart hunting because the meat is relatively cooler and not so much Adrenalin is secreted into the blood.

But most critical thing beginning and novice antelope hunters overlook is cooling the meat as quickly as possible by removing the skin and getting the meat into coolers with ice as quickly as possible. Do that and you have little to no gamey taste as long as you also remove the glands and fat when you do the butchering.
Great info here Doug. Thanks for sharing this information.
 

Slick307

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May 18, 2019
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A little off topic. Can someone explain why in Texas on every hunt i have been on there and all of them on TV they leave the guts in bring it to the barn then take the guts out and then take the guts back to the field?
I have killed a lot of antelope and have always taken good care of them and never had a problem with meat. Get out guts, Frozen juggs and then in the cool. (Pretty handy to have a walk in cooler)
 

NEWHunter

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Jul 15, 2018
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Brookfield, WI
A little off topic. Can someone explain why in Texas on every hunt i have been on there and all of them on TV they leave the guts in bring it to the barn then take the guts out and then take the guts back to the field?
I have killed a lot of antelope and have always taken good care of them and never had a problem with meat. Get out guts, Frozen juggs and then in the cool. (Pretty handy to have a walk in cooler)
Probably because it’s a lot of big private land holdings down there and lots of folks have barns. Easier to drag a smallish whitetail a hundred yards and hang it up and gut it/process it than trying to do it around all the cactus, etc. Glad to hear they’re not throwing the guts in the garbage.
 

thusby

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Apr 2, 2019
Messages
161
A little off topic. Can someone explain why in Texas on every hunt i have been on there and all of them on TV they leave the guts in bring it to the barn then take the guts out and then take the guts back to the field?
I have killed a lot of antelope and have always taken good care of them and never had a problem with meat. Get out guts, Frozen juggs and then in the cool. (Pretty handy to have a walk in cooler)
Same thing in Mississippi at the hunting camps. All I can figure is that they are such small deer that they want them to weigh over a hundred pounds when they get them on the scale.
 

Big Bore

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Dec 25, 2018
Messages
68
Location
Texas
A little off topic. Can someone explain why in Texas on every hunt i have been on there and all of them on TV they leave the guts in bring it to the barn then take the guts out and then take the guts back to the field?
I have killed a lot of antelope and have always taken good care of them and never had a problem with meat. Get out guts, Frozen juggs and then in the cool. (Pretty handy to have a walk in cooler)
Many land owners here have designated gut piles and can be for a variety of reasons (predator control, management surveys, etc), but ultimately the reasons don't matter. 97% of Texas is privately owned, so if you want to hunt here and don't already own your own land, you are most likely leasing from someone who does. And since it's their land, it's their rules that trump all else. In my opinion it's also a lot easier to gut a deer while it's hanging vs. on the ground.
 
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