This is what's wrong with hunting.

wllm1313

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Aurora, CO
How does salvage work with wounded or dead game on your property? As a landowner can you salvage other peoples animals without a tag, are you required to either let them get it or let it rot?

Could the landowner allow them to get the meat, but could the land owner keep the head?

I realize there is probably a ton of variation state by state, but I'm curious if anyone has any first hand knowledge.
 

WyoDoug

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Apr 8, 2019
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Cheyenne, Wyoming
After having a chance to view the video, this guy is not an ethical hunter.

1) He should not of let the arrow go so close to a property boundary.
2) He did not have a good kill shoot to start with with the quartering on that I saw.
3) He should of never bothered to retrieve the antlers and gloat over them the way he did at the end. That is NOT good hunting skills.

Overall, this guy displayed poor hunting ethics period.
 

DouglasR

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Jan 9, 2019
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Lots of bad decisions in that video. NOTHING to be proud of. Idaho should have nailed them for Wanton Waste. As a landowner that borders a state hunting area I’m torn. I don’t want to see an animal go to waste, but I also don’t want to reward some jackass for hunting a well marked property line where they should know there is a chance of not recovering an animal they shoot.
For the sake of debate and because I need to make some post’s in order to lose the dreaded “new member” title next to my name:
What would you guys consider an appropriate distance to hunt from a property line? Would you consider it inappropriate to hunt the field edge in the attached photo without permission from all 3 landowners?
I was in a similar situation to this guy last fall. I made a bad shot on a buck about an hour before sunset with rain moving in that wasn’t in the forecast earlier in the day. Made the decision to go out to the car and wait a couple hrs before going back in to look for him. I prob would’ve left him overnight, but with rain on its way I decided I’d better give it a shot. As I approached my stand I’m fairly certain I saw the reflective eyes of a limping deer, illuminated by my headlamp, headed east into the private ag field in the photo. After that I went to the spot where I’d shot the deer and followed the trail approximately 100 yds to the northern property line. The next day I obtained permission from the landowner and got back on the trail hoping for the best. I was able to follow the trail about another 100 yds in a circle until it dried up. I never recovered the deer. I didn’t get quite as teary eyed as they do on some of the YT shows but I felt pretty damn bad. It was Nov. 3rd, prob the only day I can remember exactly where I was last year.
So back to my original question:
How close is too close? I was sitting about 30 yards from the property line, which I’ll admit is pretty close. However, the deer ran 100 yds further into the public before crossing back to private. The entire piece of public is only like 450 yds across.
Let’s say you owned the public ground and the guy that owned the field would not give you permission to trail deer onto his land? Would you not hunt the edge of your own property?
Also, as a millennial, I feel kinda bad for this guy. While I prob wouldn’t have shared the footage myself, he obviously put a lot of time into this and now he’s getting roasted on a forum that was created by a guy that quite possibly inspired him to film himself in the 1st place.
Those earring are kinda sus tho 😏
 

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BuzzH

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Jan 9, 2001
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Laramie, WY
For the sake of debate and because I need to make some post’s in order to lose the dreaded “new member” title next to my name:
What would you guys consider an appropriate distance to hunt from a property line? Would you consider it inappropriate to hunt the field edge in the attached photo without permission from all 3 landowners?
I was in a similar situation to this guy last fall. I made a bad shot on a buck about an hour before sunset with rain moving in that wasn’t in the forecast earlier in the day. Made the decision to go out to the car and wait a couple hrs before going back in to look for him. I prob would’ve left him overnight, but with rain on its way I decided I’d better give it a shot. As I approached my stand I’m fairly certain I saw the reflective eyes of a limping deer, illuminated by my headlamp, headed east into the private ag field in the photo. After that I went to the spot where I’d shot the deer and followed the trail approximately 100 yds to the northern property line. The next day I obtained permission from the landowner and got back on the trail hoping for the best. I was able to follow the trail about another 100 yds in a circle until it dried up. I never recovered the deer. I didn’t get quite as teary eyed as they do on some of the YT shows but I felt pretty damn bad. It was Nov. 3rd, prob the only day I can remember exactly where I was last year.
So back to my original question:
How close is too close? I was sitting about 30 yards from the property line, which I’ll admit is pretty close. However, the deer ran 100 yds further into the public before crossing back to private. The entire piece of public is only like 450 yds across.
Let’s say you owned the public ground and the guy that owned the field would not give you permission to trail deer onto his land? Would you not hunt the edge of your own property?
Also, as a millennial, I feel kinda bad for this guy. While I prob wouldn’t have shared the footage myself, he obviously put a lot of time into this and now he’s getting roasted on a forum that was created by a guy that quite possibly inspired him to film himself in the 1st place.
Those earring are kinda sus tho 😏
Good question regarding how close to hunt next to a boundary.

I think it depends on what you're hunting, and what weapon you're hunting with. Probably depends on the adjacent landowner as well. Elk with an arrow, things can go to chit in a hurry. Pretty much assured you aren't going to anchor the animal on the spot with an arrow.

Deer are a lot easier to kill with an arrow, many places in the mid-west and east you hunt smaller properties. Likely going to be a lot of understanding in places like that by all involved that animals that are hit are going to often times make it onto someone else's property. The West is different, lots of uptight landowners.

Rifle hunting, I'd shoot one leaning on the wire of a property boundary if it was something I really wanted. But would probably only do so if I had a great rest and was sure I could put a bullet through the CNS and drop the animal on the spot. With an arrow? Probably not going to get very close to the boundary unless I had permission before hand from the adjacent landowner to pursue a hit animal.
 

WyoDoug

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Apr 8, 2019
Messages
887
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Cheyenne, Wyoming
For the sake of debate and because I need to make some post’s in order to lose the dreaded “new member” title next to my name:
What would you guys consider an appropriate distance to hunt from a property line? Would you consider it inappropriate to hunt the field edge in the attached photo without permission from all 3 landowners?
I was in a similar situation to this guy last fall. I made a bad shot on a buck about an hour before sunset with rain moving in that wasn’t in the forecast earlier in the day. Made the decision to go out to the car and wait a couple hrs before going back in to look for him. I prob would’ve left him overnight, but with rain on its way I decided I’d better give it a shot. As I approached my stand I’m fairly certain I saw the reflective eyes of a limping deer, illuminated by my headlamp, headed east into the private ag field in the photo. After that I went to the spot where I’d shot the deer and followed the trail approximately 100 yds to the northern property line. The next day I obtained permission from the landowner and got back on the trail hoping for the best. I was able to follow the trail about another 100 yds in a circle until it dried up. I never recovered the deer. I didn’t get quite as teary eyed as they do on some of the YT shows but I felt pretty damn bad. It was Nov. 3rd, prob the only day I can remember exactly where I was last year.
So back to my original question:
How close is too close? I was sitting about 30 yards from the property line, which I’ll admit is pretty close. However, the deer ran 100 yds further into the public before crossing back to private. The entire piece of public is only like 450 yds across.
Let’s say you owned the public ground and the guy that owned the field would not give you permission to trail deer onto his land? Would you not hunt the edge of your own property?
Also, as a millennial, I feel kinda bad for this guy. While I prob wouldn’t have shared the footage myself, he obviously put a lot of time into this and now he’s getting roasted on a forum that was created by a guy that quite possibly inspired him to film himself in the 1st place.
Those earring are kinda sus tho 😏
It's know your shot and know your limits. If a deer, elk, or other big game is within 100 yards of a property boundary and I was hunting archery, I would probably let it go. For rifle I would go as close as 50 yards IF I had confidence in a killing shot. There is no one rule that can apply to everyone. If there is a herd, which direction is it going because the bull or buck is likely to go in the direction that the herd went after the shot. If there are natural or man made barriers between the property line and the animal, I might take the shot. Severely wounded animals are not likely to jump fences or run far uphill. So I would judge on that.

That being said, all hunters are human and make mistakes. If you wound an animal but can't retrieve it, report it to the game and fish. For me, my hunting is done at that point and I sign off on the tag so it can't be used again. I also would not take the antlers from an animal I wounded and wasted.
 

Pelican

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Apr 24, 2018
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Fruita, Colorado
How close is too close? I was sitting about 30 yards from the property line, which I’ll admit is pretty close. However, the deer ran 100 yds further into the public before crossing back to private. The entire piece of public is only like 450 yds across.
Let’s say you owned the public ground and the guy that owned the field would not give you permission to trail deer onto his land? Would you not hunt the edge of your own property?
Also, as a millennial, I feel kinda bad for this guy. While I prob wouldn’t have shared the footage myself, he obviously put a lot of time into this and now he’s getting roasted on a forum that was created by a guy that quite possibly inspired him to film himself in the 1st place.
Those earring are kinda sus tho 😏
I wouldn’t hunt 30 yards from property I didn’t have permission to access with archery equipment. Of all the animals I’ve shot or seen others shoot with a bow, most go considerably farther than that even when hit in the right spot. Animals tend to continue in the same direction after the shot, so an animal coming off of inaccessible land is different from one traveling towards inaccessible land. If I had to pick a distance, it would be 125-150 yards at a minimum, and I would not shoot unless the animal was moving away from the inaccessible property. I’m fortunate to have a lot of public land where I can avoid this situation.
 

Cornell2012

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Jun 8, 2009
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Portland, OR
  • For starter's, the video cover is cringeworthy
  • At the end he thanks IDFG for helping him claim his largest bull yet :sick:
  • Wouldn't hunt borders with a bow.
  • How much of a fraud would you feel like looking at the mount? Because you know he bought a cape and had it shoulder mounted, I'd bet my retirement.
The video work is...not great. I was hoping someone figured out how to use autofocus before the end of the video. I was sorely disappointed.
Both shots were as light was fading (look at all the noise on the video - it was probably much darker than it appeared to be).
I would have felt physically ill had this been me. This is not a trophy.
The first shot was just not good. I'm not sure where the hunter was, but the elk was basically looking straight at the camera when they shot.
I get that things happen, and that there is even more variance in archery than with rifle, but this is not a hunt that should have been made into a video. They could have at least focused more on the attempted recovery, but as it is it seems like they were just lobbing arrows at antlers and not really worrying about repercussions.

The other question I have - these are the two shots that made it on video. How many happened that didn't?
 

WyoDoug

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Apr 8, 2019
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887
Location
Cheyenne, Wyoming
The other question I have - these are the two shots that made it on video. How many happened that didn't?
Gut feeling myself, is there was more shots made than what is shown. This guy should of never posed with the antlers as if it were a trophy the way he did.
 

ClearCreek

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Jul 13, 2017
Messages
233
I don't understand how they were denied permission to retrieve the bull, but later granted permission once they were good and sure the meat was spoiled. Why didn't they call F&G to retrieve it while it was salvageable?
Madtom:
Calling the G&F (or whatever your Dept. is called) does not guarantee you access to private land where your wounded animal died.

In Wyoming if your wounded animal crosses onto private land and the land owner denies you permission to retrieve that animal, calling the local game warden will do you no good if the land owner still says "NO".

ClearCreek
 

WyoDoug

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Cheyenne, Wyoming
Madtom:
Calling the G&F (or whatever your Dept. is called) does not guarantee you access to private land where your wounded animal died.

In Wyoming if your wounded animal crosses onto private land and the land owner denies you permission to retrieve that animal, calling the local game warden will do you no good if the land owner still says "NO".

ClearCreek
The law still requires to to report a wounded animal and there is a toll free number for that in the pamphlet they mail out.
 

madtom

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Feb 2, 2017
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WY
Madtom:
Calling the G&F (or whatever your Dept. is called) does not guarantee you access to private land where your wounded animal died.

In Wyoming if your wounded animal crosses onto private land and the land owner denies you permission to retrieve that animal, calling the local game warden will do you no good if the land owner still says "NO".

ClearCreek
Not sure if you watched the video, but the jokers say they were denied access by the landowner when the bull was alive and wounded. Then four days later they were granted access while escorted by Idaho F&G. My question was why didn’t they pursue being escorted sooner when the meat could have been salvaged.
 

FLS

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Joined
Jan 10, 2019
Messages
194
For the sake of debate and because I need to make some post’s in order to lose the dreaded “new member” title next to my name:
What would you guys consider an appropriate distance to hunt from a property line? Would you consider it inappropriate to hunt the field edge in the attached photo without permission from all 3 landowners?
I was in a similar situation to this guy last fall. I made a bad shot on a buck about an hour before sunset with rain moving in that wasn’t in the forecast earlier in the day. Made the decision to go out to the car and wait a couple hrs before going back in to look for him. I prob would’ve left him overnight, but with rain on its way I decided I’d better give it a shot. As I approached my stand I’m fairly certain I saw the reflective eyes of a limping deer, illuminated by my headlamp, headed east into the private ag field in the photo. After that I went to the spot where I’d shot the deer and followed the trail approximately 100 yds to the northern property line. The next day I obtained permission from the landowner and got back on the trail hoping for the best. I was able to follow the trail about another 100 yds in a circle until it dried up. I never recovered the deer. I didn’t get quite as teary eyed as they do on some of the YT shows but I felt pretty damn bad. It was Nov. 3rd, prob the only day I can remember exactly where I was last year.
So back to my original question:
How close is too close? I was sitting about 30 yards from the property line, which I’ll admit is pretty close. However, the deer ran 100 yds further into the public before crossing back to private. The entire piece of public is only like 450 yds across.
Let’s say you owned the public ground and the guy that owned the field would not give you permission to trail deer onto his land? Would you not hunt the edge of your own property?
Also, as a millennial, I feel kinda bad for this guy. While I prob wouldn’t have shared the footage myself, he obviously put a lot of time into this and now he’s getting roasted on a forum that was created by a guy that quite possibly inspired him to film himself in the 1st place.
Those earring are kinda sus tho 😏
IMO you shouldn’t have been archery hunting there if you hadn’t contacted the adjoining landowners. A well hit deer can cover a lot of ground and their likely headed for cover, not an open field. If I’m looking at your pictures correctly there was a poor chance of you recovering a deer on the property you were hunting.
An no I wouldn’t hunt someone’s property line that wouldn’t give permission to go on it. If the deer were feeding in the field, I would try an get as close to their bedding as possible and intercept them as far from the field / property line as possible.
 
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