Pop Up Blinds

Jorgy

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Joined
May 13, 2013
Messages
570
Location
Land-O-Cheese
So, I've never used a pop up blind, or a portable blind (whatever they are called) I've been watching a really nice buck come out in a field that is split between public and private and there is nowhere on the public side to conceal myself.

So, if I were to buy a pop up blind, does it have to sit out for deer to get used to it, or does it "work" right away?
 

10Dogs

Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2015
Messages
148
Jorgy,
I have hunted a Double Bull Matrix for many years with varied success on whitetails.
The owners of Double Bull at the time I bought mine produced a video named Enter the Matrix.
They gave a lot of tips about brushing in and staging blind against a backdrop.
They discussed a rule of 50/100, if you have 100 yds visibility they say you can be in the open.
At 50 yards you need to brush in completely. I usually pop mine up under a holly tree and I will pile deadfall or in NJ cornstalks on top and on the sides leaving the windows (screens) to shoot through.
To me the most important concern is 200 square inches of Blaze fabric or paint visible on all sides. Check local laws for your requirements, however if they don`t require anything I would still go big on the Blaze Orange. The deer do not care and ethical sportsmen will give you space to hunt provided they see you. 10Dogs
 

Muskeez

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Joined
Aug 21, 2012
Messages
1,690
Location
NW Iowa
I have shot several whitetails from such blinds, but they have been on private land where I can leave them up several weeks before use. I also go to extremes to brush them in with the exact same vegetation as is in the area. I try to give them a "soft" look by not just having vegetation plastered to the side of it, but also sticking out from it. I go inside and cut away as much room as I need to shoot out of the windows, and no more. They will look at the hole and you will swear they are looking into your soul sometimes. I do not use the mesh screens, just because I don't trust them and my near 50 year old eyeballs can't see through them very well. I have shot deer as close as 10' in a picked cornfield with a blind covered in stalks. It's quite a rush, and yes it works, but don't be surprised if a certain deer changes his routine upon a new piece of furniture showing up in his living room. But you might as well try it, you have nothing to loose. Good luck and let us know how it works.

ps. If heavy rains or snows may become an issue be sure you have a pole holding the center of the roof tightly up when you are not there. I have had several of them collapse from weight after having a lot of brush up there already. Also get the dirt under your feet as smooth and quiet as possible.
 

gregt9146

Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2015
Messages
192
Blinds

I have shot several Whitetail deer from ground blinds, but like was stated previously I set mine up early before season to get them use to it. I have never brushed it in but I try to set it up along the edge of the trees about 25 yards off the trail. Also I lay a piece of carpet on the ground inside the blind to keep the noise down, and that works really well.
 
Joined
Oct 7, 2014
Messages
572
The biggest key to me is tucking a blind in under or into a tree and then making sure 2 windows on opposite panels never stay open.

I've used every blind from hoop style Ameristeps to double bulls. I really love the double bulls but they are not light. Generally speaking double bull blinds have a way of walking off even on private property.

Make sure the blind is big enough to draw a bow inside, I had one 60x60 that I had to stick my elbow out the window of to draw.

I like to shoot kneeling from the blinds because a chair requires a lot of adjustment. Mostly I just like them when its raining.
 

Olelkhtr

New member
Joined
Sep 6, 2015
Messages
3
Location
Maryland
Never used ground blinds in CO, but in the East for whitetails ...the better you brush them and the longer they sit out ahead of time...the better they work. A "nice" buck may be a bit skittish for a few days but that depends on whether the does are dragging him past. Wear dark clothes in the blind, sit still, and watch the wind.
 

10Dogs

Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2015
Messages
148
+1 what Olelkhtr said...

When I remember to do so and I am trying to set up on a scrape.
I wear a black silk mask (think Ninja) with black shirt or fleece.
Black gloves.....this was all learned from Double Bull promo video.
Also as stated above, keep the back of blind closed due to sky lining front to back.
 

Don K

Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
463
Location
Northern Illinois
Another tip if your putting it up for a long time. I use wooden doll rods for the stakes to hold the blind down. This way when I want to move it or take it down and if the ground is frozen or iced over I can just snap off the wooden stakes (kick them to break them off) and remove the blind.
 

StrutNut

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Joined
Jun 21, 2011
Messages
567
Location
Blaine, MN
Ok so I am going to be the exception? I seldom have the opportunity to leave them up as I know they will be taken as I hunt public ground as well as some private but near public enough that things seem to walk away if you know what I mean. I really think if possible leaving them out is the way to go but having said that I have shot several after just putting up the blind. In one hunt I was able to drive to the location, pop up blind, put gear in blind. I went to park just to watch 2 trophy bucks walk right past it before I could get there. I have a cheap blind that I spray painted white with black stripes for hunting in snow. My other is a Double Bull. The Double Bull are awesome. I stick to the same rule as above. Keep the back windows shut, wear black and stay in the back of the blind. If I am in the sun I keep the mesh up, in the shade I often have it down. Get a great adjustable legged chair or stool. The best spots are not often on level ground. Also, in cold weather, dont worry about using a heater. For whatever reason the glow from the heater also doesnt seem to spook them. I had my son out for his first black powder hunt and set the blind up in the snow and had the heater cranked up so he would stay warm. Had a 140 class at 60 yards that just looked at us and kept browsing. unfortunately my son missed. I have seen deer look at the blind and just not care. The worst situation is when they are in tight and suddenly notice it. Thats when they are the most jumpy. I am actually really thinking of ditching the tree stands to hunt more on the ground. Being eye to eye with them is a lot of fun.
 
Joined
Oct 7, 2014
Messages
572
Ok so I am going to be the exception? I seldom have the opportunity to leave them up as I know they will be taken as I hunt public ground as well as some private but near public enough that things seem to walk away if you know what I mean.

I don't have the option of leaving mine up even overnight per the public land regulations where I hunt. Last year I put up my ground blind and my buddy had a 3.5 Y/O buck come within 35 yards of the blind 2 days in a row in 2 different spots. He was a little spooky, but was in range both days, my friend just couldn't get it done. He had does within 5 yards both days, none of them seemed to care.

Same area 2 years prior during the late muzzleloader season my friend and I put the blind up in the middle of a field and he shot a doe at 80 yards. These are deer that get hunted hard and she started to realize something was wrong right before he took the shot.

I've always felt the prevailing mentality was that stands are best left up a long time (weeks, months, years) or only put at the time of use. I feel like there are proponents of both view points as better or worse.

This is one of those things where some people have a lot more luxury than others depending on the situation and you have to play the hand you are dealt. Keeping windows closed and having a background are the most important things to use. Figuring how to shoot from a blind is also something you should practice.
 

1_pointer

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 20, 2000
Messages
18,123
Location
Indiana
Well, I put mine out on Sunday for the youth season the last weekend of the month. With some rain soon, the food should grow, and with some luck my son will have a deer very used to the blind by then!
 

Rocky176

Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2013
Messages
329
I have used pop up blinds here in Pa and on elk hunts in Colorado with good success. Give it a try.
 

maxx

Active member
Joined
Jul 31, 2015
Messages
717
The biggest key to me is tucking a blind in under or into a tree and then making sure 2 windows on opposite panels never stay open.

I've used every blind from hoop style Ameristeps to double bulls. I really love the double bulls but they are not light. Generally speaking double bull blinds have a way of walking off even on private property.

Make sure the blind is big enough to draw a bow inside, I had one 60x60 that I had to stick my elbow out the window of to draw.

I like to shoot kneeling from the blinds because a chair requires a lot of adjustment. Mostly I just like them when its raining.

This I have had pretty good luck tucking them under a tree that is hanging down. When I do this I can do minimal brushing in.

If you could leave it out I think you could get away without much brushing but they will avoid it for a while until they get used to it.
 
AMK Sportsman

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