Nevada non-resident 2021

Zim

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Ramabanana, Why not make personal attacks on the many others here dissing Nevada’s draw value? It’s time for you to post your NV trophy photos from decades before squared points changed the game for newbies. And act like nothing has changed. 😂 Everybody is waiting!
 

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Jdp010

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Nevada is perhaps the worst investment a traveling NR hunter can make.

Even many of those who already started would probably drop out if they truly understood how bad it is. But newbie NRs definitely shouldn't start - even if they are only 12 years old.
 
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jabber

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I started applying in 2008 in Nevada, in 2012 I drew deer with 3 points, but turned it back in as I couldn't hunt it. In 2013 drew bull elk with 4 points, and in 2016 I drew elk again with 2 points. Don't let the people scare you out of applying in Nevada. It is guaranteed that you won't draw if you don't apply.
 

lawtonbj

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I started applying in 2008 in Nevada, in 2012 I drew deer with 3 points, but turned it back in as I couldn't hunt it. In 2013 drew bull elk with 4 points, and in 2016 I drew elk again with 2 points. Don't let the people scare you out of applying in Nevada. It is guaranteed that you won't draw if you don't apply.
Is it possible to buy a Nonresident Nevada hunting license late in the draw application cycle and apply for that year and apply early for the draw the following year with the same license? Trying to see if the $160 could potentially be used for 2 draw cycles. Obviously would have to buy the license if tag was drawn.
 

ImBillT

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No, I understand probabilities and statistics. And I understand how the system works

"Bonus points are squared by species category to determine how many random numbers from 1 to 99 million will be drawn from the random number generator. The lowest of the random numbers for each species category will be assigned as the “draw” number for that species category application. For example, if an applicant has 10 bonus points for antlered elk, you square 10 to get 100 and add 1 (applicant with zero bonus points is assigned 1 random number) for a total of 101 random numbers with the lowest being the draw number assigned to the antlered elk application. Those applying as a "party hunt" will have their bonus points averaged (total points of all hunters in the party, divided by the number of hunters) and rounded to the closest whole number. All applications for all species categories are sorted in ascending order and tags are awarded to applications with the lowest draw numbers."

Just for the heck of it I used a random number generator a couple of years ago just to see if I squared points and drew that number of random numbers, how low of a number might I draw. Wouldn't you know the lowest number I drew was still a high 6 digit number doing the exercise multiple times. What did I learn from that? Nothing that I didn't already know from playing a slot machine in a casino. I could spend years playing a machine and drop millions in the slot and win nothing only to watch a guy walk up behind me and drop a dollar in the slot and win millions. At the same time I could watch someone play for years and drop millions in the slot and win nothing and I could be the guy that drops a dollar in the slot and win the millions. I could also drop a dollar in the slot and loose my dollar. Random is Random.

I could choose not to apply for a tag and be guaranteed to never draw a tag. I could choose to apply for a tag and have the chance to draw said tag the first time or continue to apply for tags increasing the number of chances I have to draw said tag by increasing the number of chances I have to have a lower random number assigned to my application.

Like I said, I will continue to apply each year as I do enjoy the opportunity and have drawn tags in the past in fact last year I drew a tag with zero points. Random is random right?

I was only making the observation that the median of the successful draw applicants seemed to be located in the low to midpoint of the population and did not demonstrate the often perceived more points better chances theory for the one period that I looked at. As for my BIL my comment, refer back to the slot machine comment.
More points IS a better CHANCE. It isn’t just perceived. It is real. There were a few other comments in your post that I’m not going to address that do not quite jive with how probability and statistics work.

The take away on NV should be, the odds are low, no matter how many points you have. If you want to hunt apply elsewhere. If you’re already applying elsewhere and going hunting, and you’d like a chance at NV, then by all means apply there. You may get lucky.

There are some archery deer tags with decent odds if that’s your thing.
 
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ImBillT

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If you don't like the rules, don't play the game.
I don’t play the point game in NV.

Your suggestion is flawed though. It is usually acceptable to play the game(by the rules) and lobby for better rules simultaneously.

In the long term, your odds/dollar are better by playing the NV point game. I don’t remember how many years you hade to be in to get ahead. It was quite a NV. No one should apply in NV for anything other than archery deer with the EXPECTATION of drawing someday. They should go in knowing that they may never draw, and that if they do draw, it will most likely be many years down the road. If they have the money to spend that way, then by all means more power to them.

There is nothing wrong with giving people correct information about NV’s draw odds over time so that they can make an informed decision, yet anytime that I do, you chime in with worthless statements such as the one that I quoted.
 
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ImBillT

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As a Nevada resident I understand everyone's frustration with the draw system. There just aren't that many animals compared to other states due to our lack of water. We sure do grow some big critters though.

Hell, it took me three points to draw a spike bull elk tag last year.
My only frustration with the SYSTEM in NV is the squaring of points. Most of the rest of their system is fairly good. That said, their tag numbers are such that per dollar spent, the odds are terrible. I budget $2k/yr total for applications, tags and fuel, and what’s left over goes toward updating equipment. I accept that there are a few tags that are essentially OIL that would put me over budget, and that my NM app causes me to temporarily go over budget while I wait for my refund. When it’s all said and done, for my personal goals and budget, NV is too costly for something that has a better chance of never happening that it does of happening. I can hunt muledeer elsewhere and be very happy, so once that’s out, there isn’t much left for me in NV that has good draw odds. It’s not that I’m frustrated at the state, it just doesn’t make sense for me to apply there until my hunting budget increases substantially.
 

ImBillT

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Nevada is perhaps the worst investment a traveling NR hunter can make.

Even many of those who already started would probably drop out if they truly understood how bad it is. But newbie NRs definitely shouldn't start - even if they are only 12 years old.
It’s one of the lowest values in terms of cost to apply compared to the probability that you will draw a tag, BUT if you have the money to burn(I do not) and are applying everywhere else that you want to hunt, then you should absolutely apply, and you should absolutely pay for the points. If you apply for 20yrs without paying to get your point, you get 20 chances at the tag. If you pay the money and apply for twenty years you get 2471 chances at the tag. If anyone thinks that 2471 chances isn’t better than 20...they don’t understand.
 
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Big Fin

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Nevada is perhaps the worst investment a traveling NR hunter can make.
I can see where that would be the case for some, maybe many.

Yet, with my preferred manner of hunting mule deer being archery in August, Nevada is a no-brainer for me. If I was not so attached to that August hunting, I might have a different perspective. But as it is, Nevada is the easiest non-resident archery tag to draw if you are willing to put a very low-demand unit as your 5th choice. I do that and even if I draw my last choice I am still hunting better mule deer quality than what I can find in my home state.

I often get asked what are the lowest value states, relative to cost. I look at the number and quality of antelope in Nevada, along with some reasonable odds for mule deer, and it causes me to rank it a higher value than Utah, even if I didn't have a bug for archery mule deer.

With the huge fee increases and non-refundable costs, Idaho Big 3 has been sliding down my "value" list faster than any state. No longer a value to me, relative to the draw odds, so, I will send Oak more money for raffle tags and thank Idaho for the opportunity to buy NR licenses for two decades. Nothing against Idaho. Just me adjusting my value proposition to reflect my priorities, while others who have different interests and value propositions might find Idaho to still be a great value.

I make that comment to show that each state has its places where it shines and where it fails, depending on what gets you excited. If you like rifle mule deer, Colorado is a no-brainer. If you like pronghorn, Wyoming is a no-brainer. It all depends on what is your most desired species/weapon. To others who don't have a passion for rifle mule deer or antelope, Colorado and Wyoming might be considered lower value.

To ridicule someone because they like/dislike the value a state offers for their personal hunting interests is a rather strange position, in my mind. We each allocate our scarce dollars according to what is most appealing to us. This entire "value" discussion is as much of a personal situation as is rifle/ammo/cartridge choices.

Carry on ......
 

TheGrayRider

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253
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Indiana

The Silver State pays off in time. I love Nevada (and Utah). 10 points on application this year. I am blessed. Apply, apply, apply!Time to get in better shape!​

Mar 23, 2021​

Dear “TheGrayRider:”

Thank you for applying for the 2021 NR Guided Draw. Here are your results:


NR Restricted Antlered Mule Deer Hunt Application Result: Successful
061, 062, 064, 066 - 068
Mule Deer
Non-Resident
Any Legal Weapon
Antlered
October 21, 2021 - November 05, 2021
 

wtrfwlhunter

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Mar 11, 2013
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The Silver State pays off in time. I love Nevada (and Utah). 10 points on application this year. I am blessed. Apply, apply, apply!Time to get in better shape!​

Mar 23, 2021​

Dear “TheGrayRider:”

Thank you for applying for the 2021 NR Guided Draw. Here are your results:


NR Restricted Antlered Mule Deer Hunt Application Result: Successful
061, 062, 064, 066 - 068
Mule Deer
Non-Resident
Any Legal Weapon
Antlered
October 21, 2021 - November 05, 2021
Nice man. Have fun
 

eshunt

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Sierra
I can see where that would be the case for some, maybe many.

Yet, with my preferred manner of hunting mule deer being archery in August, Nevada is a no-brainer for me. If I was not so attached to that August hunting, I might have a different perspective. But as it is, Nevada is the easiest non-resident archery tag to draw if you are willing to put a very low-demand unit as your 5th choice. I do that and even if I draw my last choice I am still hunting better mule deer quality than what I can find in my home state.
Shhhhhh! Don't tell them that. Lol.

I'm an NR and live a stones throw from the NV border and hunt upland and fish NV every year. So if I am buying a license already, might as well throw my hat in the ring for what NV has to offer. I have been lucky enough to be on a number of elk and deer hunts in NV. They may be difficult to draw with long odds but the hunts are usually uncrowded and a ton of fun.
 

Gr8bawana

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Nevada
and lobby for better rules simultaneously.
That's why non-residents should have ZERO say in any states' wildlife game plan.
The system does work for many people including non-residents.
It’s not that I’m frustrated at the state, it just doesn’t make sense for me to apply there until my hunting budget increases substantially.
So just because it doesn't make sense for YOU to apply, why should others who can afford to apply not get into the game now?

Here are a couple of stats from 2020 - non-resident with 5 preference points or less.

Bull elk rifle-25 people with 5 preference points or less were successful in drawing.
Antelope buck rifle - 68 people also with 5 preference points or less were successful in drawing a tag.

Yes all non-residents have very long odds over-all but this shows there is a chance or you could just not apply and have ZERO chance.
 

jabber

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Messages
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Texas
Is it possible to buy a Nonresident Nevada hunting license late in the draw application cycle and apply for that year and apply early for the draw the following year with the same license? Trying to see if the $160 could potentially be used for 2 draw cycles. Obviously would have to buy the license if tag was drawn.
No
 

Wallydeuce

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Feb 24, 2021
Messages
157
Location
NV
I can see where that would be the case for some, maybe many.

Yet, with my preferred manner of hunting mule deer being archery in August, Nevada is a no-brainer for me. If I was not so attached to that August hunting, I might have a different perspective. But as it is, Nevada is the easiest non-resident archery tag to draw if you are willing to put a very low-demand unit as your 5th choice. I do that and even if I draw my last choice I am still hunting better mule deer quality than what I can find in my home state.

I often get asked what are the lowest value states, relative to cost. I look at the number and quality of antelope in Nevada, along with some reasonable odds for mule deer, and it causes me to rank it a higher value than Utah, even if I didn't have a bug for archery mule deer.

With the huge fee increases and non-refundable costs, Idaho Big 3 has been sliding down my "value" list faster than any state. No longer a value to me, relative to the draw odds, so, I will send Oak more money for raffle tags and thank Idaho for the opportunity to buy NR licenses for two decades. Nothing against Idaho. Just me adjusting my value proposition to reflect my priorities, while others who have different interests and value propositions might find Idaho to still be a great value.

I make that comment to show that each state has its places where it shines and where it fails, depending on what gets you excited. If you like rifle mule deer, Colorado is a no-brainer. If you like pronghorn, Wyoming is a no-brainer. It all depends on what is your most desired species/weapon. To others who don't have a passion for rifle mule deer or antelope, Colorado and Wyoming might be considered lower value.

To ridicule someone because they like/dislike the value a state offers for their personal hunting interests is a rather strange position, in my mind. We each allocate our scarce dollars according to what is most appealing to us. This entire "value" discussion is as much of a personal situation as is rifle/ammo/cartridge choices.

Carry on ......
Nevada is a bonus point system so it can happen. My former hunting partner took 17 points for a prime unit that I drew with 4 points 10 years later (2020) for archery bull. Gohunt listed my odds at 4.2 %(Resident).
So there is a luck component to it.

It was a typical late August thru mid September Nevada hunt. Hot. Daytime temps in the high 80's to lower 90's. Dry. Last measurable moisture was in May. Hot, dry and miserable.

And I had the time of my life.
 

ImBillT

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That's why non-residents should have ZERO say in any states' wildlife game plan.
The system does work for many people including non-residents.

So just because it doesn't make sense for YOU to apply, why should others who can afford to apply not get into the game now?

Here are a couple of stats from 2020 - non-resident with 5 preference points or less.

Bull elk rifle-25 people with 5 preference points or less were successful in drawing.
Antelope buck rifle - 68 people also with 5 preference points or less were successful in drawing a tag.

Yes all non-residents have very long odds over-all but this shows there is a chance or you could just not apply and have ZERO chance.
1) As long as non-residents pay to hunt, they’ll have some degree of influence on the people making decisions about how the system works...official or not.

2) Find the post where I told someone who could afford to apply all over that they should not apply in NV. You won’t. I only encourage people to stay out of NV until they are already applying places that they can count on being able to hunt. I encourage them to enter the system(if they choose to do so) understanding that(for most tags) there is a very high chance that they will never draw. You’re apparent lack of intelligence must be impeding your ability to comprehend simple language.

3) You’re PAINFULLY inept at understanding probability and statistics. Pointing out that people drew with 5pts or less is at best worthless, and at worst harmful. If people couldn’t draw with low points, it would be a preference point system. I’m not going to waste my time right now calculating the probability over a twenty year span. I did it a few years ago, and at the time, for the hunts I was looking at, I would have had a 50-60% chance of drawing ONE rifle elk tag. For some people that’s well worth it. For me, it’s not. I’ve said that repeatedly. You never manage to comprehend that, so I have to say it again. There were a couple of rifle elk tags that were a little easier to draw, but not wildly so. As a NR who can’t spend a lot of time scouting, would be out $1200 for the tag on top of how ever many licenses I had to pay for before drawing, and(as residents alike) would be prevented from applying for the next SEVEN seasons, I’m not interested in applying for the absolute easiest to draw tag(I do that very thing in other states every year). It’s easier to draw than all the rest for a reason, and I’m not willing to risk all of the above for the absolute easiest to draw tag. One or two tags above that yes. The easiest...no.

NV is not the only state with elk, or mule deer, or sheep, or goats, or anything else they have a hunting season for. They aren’t the only state with B&C class animals either. If applying in NV is keeping someone from being able to apply in WY, MT, ID, CO, AZ, or NM, they are making a very poor gamble. If someone is already applying in states, and going hunting and they want to hunt in NV, then they should apply, and they should apply with the understanding that there is a good chance they’ll never draw a tag there. If they’re ok with that, then by all means they should apply. I’ve said it REPEATEDLY. Your head seems to be somewhere too dark to read it EVERY TIME I TYPE IT.

NV does have some deer tags with decent odds. If deer is your thing, and especially if you live close to NV and/or like archery hunting, then it completely changes the equation and makes NV a more worthwhile place to apply. I’ve said that before too, but you never seem to comprehend it. I’m happy enough hunting deer in my home state, and three nearby states. NV doesn’t offer me anything on the deer front that I care to chase after.

I think NV does have some of the better NR sheep odds...still poor. So if you’re a sheep chaser, it should probably be high on your list of states. Then again, if you’re a sheep chaser, you’re probably applying almost everywhere already.

Some years I throw NV $14(when I don’t have a tag or the tag isn’t very good). Odds/$ it’s better to spend the extra money and pick up the points, BUT that would throw a wrench in my hunting budget, and it would do so with very little probability of a payoff.
 
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ImBillT

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Nevada is a bonus point system so it can happen. My former hunting partner took 17 points for a prime unit that I drew with 4 points 10 years later (2020) for archery bull. Gohunt listed my odds at 4.2 %(Resident).
So there is a luck component to it.

It was a typical late August thru mid September Nevada hunt. Hot. Daytime temps in the high 80's to lower 90's. Dry. Last measurable moisture was in May. Hot, dry and miserable.

And I had the time of my life.
I don’t think anyone said that it COULDN’T happen. They’ve all said that you should not EXPECT it to happen. For most hunts in NV, a NR can apply their whole life, and have a fair chance that they never draw.
 
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