Is it worth it to replace my 14-year-old outfit?

Poke 'Em

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I'm not one to get the latest and greatest toys just to have them. I thought about titling the thread "Should I upgrade my 14-year-old outfit," but that's really the question - how much of an "upgrade" would I really be doing? I'm currently shooting a HCA Power Extreme Pro that I got in 2001 as a HS graduation present (72 lb draw). I've lately given a little bit of thought to replacing it, but what would the tangible benefit of a new bow/outfit be?

I haven't really paid much attention to bowhunting technology the last 10 years, and marketing is just marketing, so I'm not sure how much room for improvement there really is.

Thoughts?
 

idahojoe

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If it works for you and you don't see the need to upgrade, if it still shoots your arrows where you aim it and takes down animals effectively why spend the money?
 

LopeHunter

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Is the bow a composite? Does age or cumulative number of draws increase the likelihood of a catastrophic failure? If there are risks then that might be a consideration.
 

T Bone

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Go shoot a new model. That will tell you everything you need to know.

I upgrade every 10 years and see significant differences.
 

MinnesotaHunter

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Go shoot a new model. That will tell you everything you need to know.

I upgrade every 10 years and see significant differences.

HAHA, If you are trying to talk yourself into a new bow, this is great advice. If you would just as soon not, doing this will not help your cause.

New bows are going to give you a smoother draw cycle, quieter release, and in most cases more forgiveness. Don't worry about speed, they are all plenty fast.
 

Elkwhisper

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I think you will VERY surprised to find out what you are missing.... Not a whole lot has change when it comes to centerfire rifles in the last 10 years.... but bows have come a LOOOOONG way.

Don't go shoot a new one, unless you are ready to buy one. That said, you don't necessarily need the $1000 flagship bow each manufacture pushes... there are lots of good bows you can get into at the $500-600 price point. Or better yet, find a goofball like me that trades bows every year and get a year old one for a significantly lower price.
 

Poke 'Em

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So what exactly has changed that makes today's bows so much better than a decade ago? Again, I haven't followed the changes, and I tend to ignore the marketing hype, so on the surface, I don't see huge differences, but I also haven't shot a new bow either.

What differences should I expect to find?
 

Gunner46

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I'm still shooting a beautifully laminated 1980's Darton 45-60# pounder, with a 60% letoff. Mostly set at 52#. 2018's & 100gr Thunderheads, Slower, yes, but it gets complete pass through, unless I hit bone. And I KNOW where it hits.

Why change something that works ?
 

JLS

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So what exactly has changed that makes today's bows so much better than a decade ago? Again, I haven't followed the changes, and I tend to ignore the marketing hype, so on the surface, I don't see huge differences, but I also haven't shot a new bow either.

What differences should I expect to find?

Quieter, smoother draw, faster, less hand shock, to name a few. I upgraded last year from a Mathews Q2 to a Bowtech Experience.

Is it worth it? Only you can answer that question.
 

StrutNut

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Well,

I am still shooting a 2002 Hoyt Cybertech. I have shot other new bows and mine feels just as good and really seems quieter. I have not shot any new ones for 2014 or 2015 though but I had shot next to 2014 rigs and really was surprised at how noisy they where compared to my old Hoyt. I shoot heavier arrows as I know that quiets things down a bit too. I did however upgrade all components on it. New Ripcord Code Red, New Tight Spot quiver, B-Stinger stab, Black Gold Rush site. That is where I put my money. I have a buddy that gets a new Mathews about every other year and I really dont see the need. I have still been tempted by the Hoyt Carbon but the rig I have is so accurate and quiet I really have not had a major urge to get anything. I am do for a new release though. My True Ball tornado is 15 years old. Time for a new one and keep this one as a back up.
 

mixedbag

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shoot some new ones at the bow shop,then go on archerytalks classified and find a year or 2 used one for 1/2 the price.Thats what I do when I want a newer bow.Most of those guys buy the next big thing every year or two and selloff their used ones at really good prices.A new bow seems to lose 1/3 of its value in one year
Is it worth it??heck yeah it is and you will be impressed with a newer bow.Yours is almost old enough for a museum,JK
 

GearJunky

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The new bows have changed a lot, and the new materials make a nice difference (quality and durability) as well as the usual, speed, noise, and accuracy improvements. I started out with a very old Martin bow, then after 3 seasons I jumped up to a diamond iceman flx, and then two years later, I now currently shoot a Hoyt Carbon Spider.

When I made the move from the Martin to the diamond bow, I didn't even know what I was shopping for. I got all sorts of marketing hype, but it meant nothing to me, due to my lack of experience shooting multiple bows. I was lucky, the diamond bow was great for what I really wanted. It was light in the hand, and easy to shoot... also pretty quite by most standards. After many reps of shooting, and the fact I had some spare pocket change I decided to make the jump to the carbon spider. What I would suggest is make a list of all the reason you really like your bow, and then look for one that you can improve those categories. Then go try to shoot several new bows, they will start to grow on you, and then you can start to get picky.

For some perspective... changing out from the Martin to the Diamond bow is like selling your old 1970 dodge truck and getting into a new base model truck. Going from the diamond bow to the Hoyt is like upgrading to the luxury model pickup. It just makes everything that much nicer and easier to enjoy.
 

Epfd217

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I traded in my 2001 Darton Dual cam for a 2008 PSE dual cam and the difference was amazing. I loved my Darton and it did the job, but the new bows have different materials, different string materials, better cam designs and better riser designs.

Proof of the changes are seen in the stats of the bows. The old convention was that more brace height will make a bow easier to shoot and more forgiving. When I started shooting, an 8" brace height was common. Now, 6-7 in brace height is the norm and they are still very reliable. Also, the limb designs make the bows have less hand shock and less noise. Also, My old bow was a 70lb limb bow that shot at 72lbs. My new bow (7 yrs old) shoots 20 FPS faster at 62 lbs and the draw cycle is smooth.

That means my body pulls 10 pounds less draw weight and gets significantly more power. Seems like a great trade off. My body works less hard and I hold less weight at the moment of truth. Also most of the new bows have lighter risers. You can still shoot the heavier arrows and the added power of the bow will still yield benefits.

Lots of great bows made in the last 5 yrs and they are all a little different. I think its worth a look, but thats just me. I still own a sweet recurve with wood arrows too. Plwenty of animals have been killed by both.

Yes the old adage of if it aint broken don't fix it is true, but if that were the case you wouldn't even have a compound. It don't hurt to look, but I will promise, you will like the new bows. Try a few as each manufacturer has a different approach to cams and riser designs.
 

genesis273

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Before going elk hunting last year, I asked the guy who I was going with the same question. I've shot the same Diamond Rock since '07, which usually puts 4-5+ whitetail a year in my freezer, but never anything close to the size of an elk. Knowing that I was already spending a significant amount on the hunt, I was worried about that, but didn't want to spend alot of money on a hunt, only to take a sub-par bow that wouldn't get the job done.
The guy that I was going with, who has taken a few archery elk simply asked, "can you shoot it?". When I said, "you bet I can shoot it", he said to not worry about a thing!
The tight behind the shoulder shot was complete pass-through, and he only went 100 yards!
No doubt the new bows are super nice, but I catch myself replacing the string when it needs it, and squeeze out another year.

I finally traded my 15 year old truck in for a new one about two months. Yes, there are some nice gadgets on the new one, but I'm kinda missing my old truck that drove just fine, got the same gas mileage, and was paid for. Yea, that's comparing apples to oranges, but I might ride that bow a few more years. Always pass-throughs just like the new ones, the new ones do have some sweet gadgets, but my bow is paid for and shoots just fine.
 
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Joe Hulburt

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Smoother draw, quieter, less hand shock, faster and more accurate are some of the differences between 2001 and 2015.

It's hard to imagine that a 2030 model will see the same level of improvements over today but you will see it now.

I wouldn't shoot one unless you are ready to spend some money...;)
 

Gr8bawana

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If your bow works fine and puts the arrows where you want them why waste the money? Some people seem to have the need to always buy the latest product out there, not because they need it but so they can say "look what I got" it's the newest one out there. The animal that gets an arrow through the lungs is not going to know the difference.
 

Epfd217

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Accessories tend to have evolved in much finer ways. Probably the biggest change in the last 5-8 years is the drop-away rest. Drop aways will improve your accuracy by reducing the amount of rest contact you have. They are also available in full containment designs so the arrow cannot come off the rest.

Sights have changed mostly in materials except for the development of single pin slider sights. I have one and love it. Arrows have come a long way in design and consistancy, but they have not changed in design as much except for the newer low profile vanes. They can control broadheads just as good as larger, longer vanes.

Lots of great broadhead choices.

I think there are lots of good reasons to look at the newer stuff. I think every ten years or so is perfectly reasonable to upgrade. Comparing a current bow to a 10yr old or 15 yr old setup will yield quite a few surprises.
 

michsteelguy

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What a coincidence, as I was just about to post the exact same question! My bow(Martin Rage) is even older than yours but I kinda feel the same way..... if it aint broke, dont fix it! Its in GREAT shape, so why replace? As another member said: " if it shoots straight. deer wont know the difference. There must be a point where enuff is enuff and one doesnt give in, to those marketing ploys (although I know its tempting, but common sense has to take over).....especially when work only permits a few weeks outta the year to go hunting. For me, speed is not a concern, but accuracy certainly is. I know that my bow probably weighs a ton more than todays bows, but i also figure that a heavier bow would help accuracy when the "shakes" come into play. Also, I still shoot aluminums!!!!! I have my reasons though....I .normally hunt midwest whitetails in thick brush so that has worked for me in those scenarios, but out West......I know thats a whole different ballgame!! Thats my only issue that i see. I DO plan on shooting a few new ones (Elite and G5 Prime) just to be sure of my decision, but upgrading accesssories (I believe) is a fair compromise. I'll be watching this thread to get more opinions, so thanks for posting and beating me to the punch! Best of luck whatever you choose!
 
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