Crow treaty rights, thoughts?

EdP

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The SCOTUS has ruled so like Jwill said, time to renegotiate the treaty. What does the government provide to the tribes that is not covered by treaty? That is all available as negotiating leverage. If there is nothing then offer something else the tribe needs and wants and find a solution.
 

SoCalHuntr

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American land is American land... it’s all occupied they made a bad decision. But that’s just my opinion
 

BuzzH

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I don't think Wyoming or the Government have much, if any leverage to be negotiating much of anything with the Crow. Rule 1 of negotiations, don't bluff, easy way to get yourself in a jam.
 

VikingsGuy

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I don't think Wyoming or the Government have much, if any leverage to be negotiating much of anything with the Crow. Rule 1 of negotiations, don't bluff, easy way to get yourself in a jam.
The fed has all the leverage in the world. They can statutorily do just about anything they want with the Indian situation. They could take away funding, they could take away the rights to run casinos, etc. There is zero interest/will power to act, but that is a choice not a limitation.
 

BuzzH

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Right, because lawmakers and the .gov have broken so many treaties lately...political suicide if they take that path and they know it.

They don't have chit for leverage and they know that too. IF they thought leverage existed, they would have already done the things you mention.

Wyoming better get used to the Crows hunting the areas defined in the treaty...or they'll lose in court again. Wyoming would have to be a pretty slow learning bunch to make another run at prosecuting a Crow Tribal member when they just got it handed to them by the USSC.

BTW, I told you so on the case Wyoming just lost.
 

Greenhorn

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Hopefully most are too busy smoking meth and huffing to spend much time poaching wildlife.
 

ClearCreek

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Hopefully most are too busy smoking meth and huffing to spend much time poaching wildlife.
Oh, there are plenty, they have been killing deer and elk and cutting the heads off and leaving the rest to spoil for many years.

ClearCreek
 

Big Fin

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Let's try to keep the discussion on the legal options and not descend into random population-wide disparagements. Some indians do bad things, some whites do bad things, most of both groups do good.
Excellent advice, if this thread is to stay open.
 

sdkhunter

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I’ve been up in that general area like many have and it can be fairly rugged with limited road options... couldn’t WY put up a few barriers or fences in a couple of key areas and limit motorized travel in certain areas during key periods. that may at least make it hard to access from the MT side... Long as it’s not on the reservation I wouldn’t see why they couldn’t?
 

BWALKER77

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I’ve been up in that general area like many have and it can be fairly rugged with limited road options... couldn’t WY put up a few barriers or fences in a couple of key areas and limit motorized travel in certain areas during key periods. that may at least make it hard to access from the MT side... Long as it’s not on the reservation I wouldn’t see why they couldn’t?
Everyone and their brother has horses on the rez.
 

shoots-straight

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Actually I find very few using horses here. The confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes have treaty rights in Western Montana that are similar to what's be awarded to the Crow.

They usually stay away from road less, or closed roads and prefer easy access to get their game out. They usually hunt right before archery here and prefer road hunting. At least thats what I have seen.
 

BWALKER77

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Actually I find very few using horses here. The confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes have treaty rights in Western Montana that are similar to what's be awarded to the Crow.

They usually stay away from road less, or closed roads and prefer easy access to get their game out. They usually hunt right before archery here and prefer road hunting. At least thats what I have seen.
What's that have to do with the Crows?
 

antlerradar

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Right, because lawmakers and the .gov have broken so many treaties lately...political suicide if they take that path and they know it.

They don't have chit for leverage and they know that too. IF they thought leverage existed, they would have already done the things you mention.

Wyoming better get used to the Crows hunting the areas defined in the treaty...or they'll lose in court again. Wyoming would have to be a pretty slow learning bunch to make another run at prosecuting a Crow Tribal member when they just got it handed to them by the USSC.

BTW, I told you so on the case Wyoming just lost.
Three years ago I would have agreed with you on the political suicide. Now I am not so sure on that one.
 

Sytes

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They are Native American Indians. They have had the same rights that the Crow have. I have observed how they hunt. Take it as my .02cents worth on what to expect. We were talking about roadless lands getting hit hunting wise by the Crow.
To add...


Even prior to the Herrera decision, Montana had honored treaty right hunters on public federal lands, specifically the Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes.
“Court cases defined that for us a long time ago,” said Tom McDonald, the Fish, Wildlife, Recreation & Conservation Office division manager for the confederated tribes.
For male wildlife species like deer and elk, tribal hunters can shoot a bull or buck any time of the year without even purchasing a tag, he explained. For restricted species like moose or bighorn sheep, there are tag drawings for tribal members and bighorns are hunted only on the reservation. Seasons for female wildlife species run from Sept. 1 to Jan. 31, McDonald said.
I believe there is still managed hope for the "conservation" aspect left open by the Supreme Court, as presented in MT's actions related to Sheep / moose, etc. Wyoming still has opportunities. Nothing is final until the Supreme Court sings on each note addressed and "State Wildlife Conservation" is an open tune yet to sing.
 

OverlordBear

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I think we should start digging up old treaties and pay lawyers to implement those too. How much stuff does our country want coming back up from the 1800s? How many treaties do the crows want to be governed under if we are going to reopen the 1800s law books. So one with more money than me is going to consider this at some point if they haven’t already.
 
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