Llama Hunting - Prices 2021- Ouch

Sytes

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but renting them like everything else in hunting is increasing in price dramatically
Isn't that the American Economics theme?
Supply v demand... As a commodity gains popularity - prices rise. As that popularity confronts prices that reduce the desire and/or the initial trend has run it's course, the companies competition sets in and prices adjust.

I believe, specific to llamas, it's been a trend setter for backcountry use. Prices find that resistance line and correct... for the most part... or happy go lucky government inflates the reduced dollar value and minimum wages, etc increase... everything is relative (for the most part).

While I agree, 1 horse, 1 llama has its issue - I've personally seen it (horses/mules) many occasions. The frequency of your posts @wllm1313 is extraordinary in comparison to the vast majority - maybe even beyond ANY OTHER HUNT TALK MEMBER . 1700 posts a year. Not knocking your interest and I mostly enjoy your commentary. However, it may just be your frequency confronts many more than the average HT member and your proclamation that your getting tired of... is symptomatic of your frequency. ;) :)

Cheers. I agree. prices are out of this world. I think full fledged guided outfitters have a bit of a market as it caters towards those with the $$$ and beckons those once every X years budgeted savings type non resident hunters. Whereas llama rentals... I believe rentals find their way to eventual match w/ cost of living values.
 

wllm1313

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Isn't that the American Economics theme?
Supply v demand... As a commodity gains popularity - prices rise. As that popularity confronts prices that reduce the desire and/or the initial trend has run it's course, the companies competition sets in and prices adjust.

I believe, specific to llamas, it's been a trend setter for backcountry use. Prices find that resistance line and correct... for the most part... or happy go lucky government inflates the reduced dollar value and minimum wages, etc increase... everything is relative (for the most part).

While I agree, 1 horse, 1 llama has its issue - I've personally seen it (horses/mules) many occasions. The frequency of your posts @wllm1313 is extraordinary in comparison to the vast majority - maybe even beyond ANY OTHER HUNT TALK MEMBER . 1700 posts a year. Not knocking your interest and I mostly enjoy your commentary. However, it may just be your frequency confronts many more than the average HT member and your proclamation that your getting tired of... is symptomatic of your frequency. ;) :)

Cheers. I agree. prices are out of this world. I think full fledged guided outfitters have a bit of a market as it caters towards those with the $$$ and beckons those once every X years budgeted savings type non resident hunters. Whereas llama rentals... I believe rentals find their way to eventual match w/ cost of living values.
Totally it’s just economics, and like any business owners llama outfitters absolutely deserve to profit from their investments. They should charge exactly what the market allows.

To your second point, perhaps...though... did you see the d-baggery on snowys thread...🤦‍♂️

We, family and friends, have discussed going in on stock and sharing the cost.

I think the sweet spot for llamas is 3 per elk. Maybe if you just aren’t in shape and hunting a couple miles in you could get away with packing out 2 elk with two, but if you’re the kinda guy that drags sleds 20 miles into the bob, and you attempt those shenanigans with llamas you are going to have a llama rebellion midway through the first packout.
 

Sytes

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did you see the d-baggery on snowys thread
No... I've not. I (we) know Snowy knows his chit. I take it, from your comment) the poster(s) within this thread may be setting his/their own stray path. If so... blah! Haha! I can not keep up with reading post after post within each thread. My bad(?), if that's the case. :)
 

bbright

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Every time I think about llamas, I think of coming back from a stalk to find a lead rope, a puddle of blood and a grizzly bear with a full stomach.
They look handy, but they look like a perfect snack for nature.
“feed” one to the bears, have someone rear end you on the travel, have one get hurt packing a load...and your short $5k per llama. Same thing for horses usually too. Part of the rental agreement.

When I rented llamas, I was told they are hard or next to impossible to catch if they get free. It is a bad feeling to come back to camp and see that they pulled the center post out of the ground. Been there. Thankfully they were feeding and two were tethered together. Didn’t get too far before the combined leads got on the opposite sides of a bush.
 

Nick_CO

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Just read through this entire post, I am surprised at some of the pricing and the reactions to them. I definitely thought The Wilderness Ridge Llamas would cost more. I am a DIY Llama owner/trainer, with 6 total right now. At $100/Llama per day, the price seems extremely reasonable if hunting with them is an annual or bi-annual event like it is for most hunters. The yearly cost to own and maintain 4-6 Llamas is relatively cheap, I have to buy about 100 bales of hay every fall to get them through winter/spring until the pasture has grown in enough to release them for the summer. This costs me about $600. Vet bills are very rare. The largest cost to me has been all of the startup. Llamas, fencing materials, building materials for the loafing shed I had to build, saddles and panniers, a stock trailer, etc. All in all, the start up costs were probably around 12k, but now the annual cost is basically just hay which sounds about the same as what it would cost to take 3 Llamas hunting for a week if you were to rent them. I think that's a dang good price and agree with @Big Fin that the price for what the owner puts into training, equipment, feed, etc. is really quite low for quality pack animals.

I thought about renting mine but quickly realized that as a side endeavor it would not be worth it at the typical going rate. Also, teaching a never-ever Llama Packer seemed like a recipe for disaster to me and I couldn't stand the thought of someone losing or injuring a pack animal that my wife and I (mostly my wife) put so much effort into training. There are a lot of things that can go wrong if you're careless, and even the straps on the saddles and panniers can be overwhelming and done improperly if you've only seen it or done it once or twice. Overall, the market price still seems very low for Llama rentals and if you are one of the people that rents on a regular basis, enjoy it while it lasts.
 

wllm1313

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Just read through this entire post, I am surprised at some of the pricing and the reactions to them. I definitely thought The Wilderness Ridge Llamas would cost more. I am a DIY Llama owner/trainer, with 6 total right now. At $100/Llama per day, the price seems extremely reasonable if hunting with them is an annual or bi-annual event like it is for most hunters. The yearly cost to own and maintain 4-6 Llamas is relatively cheap, I have to buy about 100 bales of hay every fall to get them through winter/spring until the pasture has grown in enough to release them for the summer. This costs me about $600. Vet bills are very rare. The largest cost to me has been all of the startup. Llamas, fencing materials, building materials for the loafing shed I had to build, saddles and panniers, a stock trailer, etc. All in all, the start up costs were probably around 12k, but now the annual cost is basically just hay which sounds about the same as what it would cost to take 3 Llamas hunting for a week if you were to rent them. I think that's a dang good price and agree with @Big Fin that the price for what the owner puts into training, equipment, feed, etc. is really quite low for quality pack animals.

I thought about renting mine but quickly realized that as a side endeavor it would not be worth it at the typical going rate. Also, teaching a never-ever Llama Packer seemed like a recipe for disaster to me and I couldn't stand the thought of someone losing or injuring a pack animal that my wife and I (mostly my wife) put so much effort into training. There are a lot of things that can go wrong if you're careless, and even the straps on the saddles and panniers can be overwhelming and done improperly if you've only seen it or done it once or twice. Overall, the market price still seems very low for Llama rentals and if you are one of the people that rents on a regular basis, enjoy it while it lasts.
I feel like I’m the resident badnebear because I just point out reasonable problems/flaws.

A drop camp hunt with horses is gonna run you around $2000 for a week, there is some variability. That’s riding you into a camp on a horse and packing out your entire elk, you don’t walk or carry anything and don’t have to deal with the animals while your hunting.

DIY llamas now cost around the same amount ($100-150)per lama (2 llamas min for an elk) + trailer rental. You have to do all the work + carry a very heavy pack on the way out, unless you are doing 3-4 llamas per elk.

Trade off is flexibility for more physical effort. Point is you are definitely paying the same and you are doing way more work and taking on more responsibility ie care for animals + trailer.

Im not sure who comes out ahead financially the horse packer or the llama wrangler.

For both it’s a business, and owners should charge what the market will bear.

Let’s not bs about how expensive it’s getting, your looking at 2k to get an elk out with someone else’s stock, 1k for just a packout if you can find it. I’m sure these prices will continue to go up. I wouldn’t be surprised if we are looking at 3-4K by 2025.
 

Nick_CO

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A drop camp hunt with horses is gonna run you around $2000 for a week, there is some variability. That’s riding you into a camp on a horse and packing out your entire elk, you don’t walk or carry anything and don’t have to deal with the animals while your hunting.
If your saying that the cost of renting Llamas vs the amount of work YOU still have to do makes it worth the extra money for a drop camp or horse pack out, I guess I have to agree. Especially if others can help share costs. I still think the typical rate for Llamas is pretty reasonable though and gives you the freedom to go wherever you want and move camp whenever you want without relying on Outfitters. It's definitely more for the in-shape DIY types, which are far fewer than the other types.
 

TWC

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What’s the going rate on Alpacas? :LOL:

like anything in life, there are things you can afford and things you can’t. If you can’t, you can make sacrifices in other areas to afford it.
 

Sytes

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I still think the typical rate for Llamas is pretty reasonable though and gives you the freedom to go wherever you want and move camp whenever you want without relying on Outfitters. It's definitely more for the in-shape DIY types, which are far fewer than the other types.
My only real concern for the DIY aspect of rentals... In griz wilderness country, It's a challenging feat for the hunter(s) to scour the mountains of their camp setting w/o one remaining at camp for security of rented stock.
Outfitter drop camps, no concern over stock management.
I still like the rental aspect though how do you manage that @wllm1313 ? I suppose, in CO - you don't have the worries over griz (maybe in some 10-20 years I'd start to have concerns over wolves if the re-introduction continues) though with mtn lions and other predators...? I'd imagine it's not near the concern as WY, MT, ID griz country... and highlining, picketing is pretty secure(?).
 

Nick_CO

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I leave Llamas picketed frequently while out hunting, and I do worry about Mountain Lions from time to time I guess. If you were to lose a rental animal to a predator though, I would imagine you as the renter would still be on the hook for the loss?
 

3855WIN

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Just got my returning customer email from my llama outfitter for 2021

Prices are going up more than 2X.

In 2021 it will cost me more to rent Llamas for a week in CO then it did for me to do a fly in Prince of Wales bear hunt in 2019.

He's a great outfitter with awesome animals, I would recommend him 100% to anyone, and I'm glad his business is doing well.

That said, his price is now similar possibly a bit more than a drop camp... either of which are probably a bit too high for my budget.

Anyway, I think the llamas as an affordable pack-out option ship has sailed.
For a fella who uses a Corolla for a hunting truck, I can understand the price shock. 😂
 

Aussie_hunter_JD

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If you ladies want to complain about prices for hunting related gear move to Australia. I just ordered a new rifle for $1500 that retails for around $600 in the states. And that's the norm being half a world away from everywhere.

I saw someone complained about $800 for a gun dog, try to find a well bred one here for under $1,500most are $2k plus.

Got a price on a kifaru other day, to my door for $1,400, or a SG Sky 5900 only $1,100

Want to shoot Barnes bullets in your 30 cal? VORTX are only around $100 per box of 20, you can save and get projectiles in a box of 50 for about $90

Maybe you want to buy a Nissan titan? a steal at $150,000 drive away.

Want to fly domestically on a 3hr flight for a hunt like we're doing next year that's $500-1000 depending on the deal you can get.

We don't use llamas here because we have a big trophy hunting culture. Most folks don't need them when all they take from a dead deer is a set of antlers but rest assured if people did hire out llamas they'd be $500 a day!

You guys have it good from where I'm standing.
 

lastlight

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I leave Llamas picketed frequently while out hunting, and I do worry about Mountain Lions from time to time I guess. If you were to lose a rental animal to a predator though, I would imagine you as the renter would still be on the hook for the loss?

Predators don’t mess with pack Llamas. Goats I would worry about
 

ajricketts

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If you ladies want to complain about prices for hunting related gear move to Australia. I just ordered a new rifle for $1500 that retails for around $600 in the states. And that's the norm being half a world away from everywhere.

I saw someone complained about $800 for a gun dog, try to find a well bred one here for under $1,500most are $2k plus.

Got a price on a kifaru other day, to my door for $1,400, or a SG Sky 5900 only $1,100

Want to shoot Barnes bullets in your 30 cal? VORTX are only around $100 per box of 20, you can save and get projectiles in a box of 50 for about $90

Maybe you want to buy a Nissan titan? a steal at $150,000 drive away.

Want to fly domestically on a 3hr flight for a hunt like we're doing next year that's $500-1000 depending on the deal you can get.

We don't use llamas here because we have a big trophy hunting culture. Most folks don't need them when all they take from a dead deer is a set of antlers but rest assured if people did hire out llamas they'd be $500 a day!

You guys have it good from where I'm standing.
But we don't have free Healthcare so it all evens out 😉😂
 

Sytes

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Predators don’t mess with pack Llamas. Goats I would worry about
A quick google search, first three presented the following:




Was curious about black bears as well:



Since llamas live as domesticated animals, they’re protected by their owners and handlers. As a result, they don’t have to worry too much about predators. However, cougars, mountain lions, and snow leopards are natural enemies that will attack llamas if they get close enough.
 
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devon deer

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Touchè, if you don't know cricket that's how you bowl someone middle stump!
We don't have free healthcare do we @Aussie_hunter_JD we pay for it in tax!

As for cricket, can't stand the game! (mainly because most of the time we are crap at it!)

I asked Beau the question in relation to bears attacking his Llamas and he said he had never had an issue.

Cheers

Richard
 
AMK Sportsman

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