Interesting opening morning

Fire_9

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So I had an interesting scenario play out on Saturday. I made it to the area I wanted to hunt well before daylight to make sure I would be the first one there. As the sun was coming up we made it to a ridge top about a mile from the pickup and noticed a guy walking our direction. Didn't think much of it until I noticed he was now about 100 yards below us on the hill. I whistled at him to get his attention in hopes that he wouldn't want to hunt right on top of us. He acknowledged us, put his head back down, and kept making his way up the hill. So we dropped down off the ridge away from him and started making our way up the other side. When we got to the bottom of the draw I noticed he was also in the bottom 200 yards from us but was running to make it up to the ridge before we did. This immediately started to boil my blood. By the time I made it to the top of the ridge he was already in the bottom of the next draw. I decided to head back to the truck but decided to give him a piece of my mind before I turned around. After yelling a couple colorful words his way he turned around made his way to our position. He tried to defend his actions but didn't really have a good excuse and never denied trying to get ahead of us. After a 5 min conversation said he could have the area to himself and I headed back to the truck. I know I should kept my mouth shut and went about my business but I was pretty aggravated.

I kind of consider it an unwritten rule that if someone beats me to an area I let them have it and don't try to cut them off. Has anyone been in a similar situation? Am I overreacting? I've been stewing on it all weekend...
 

JLS

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Yep, I've had it happen. You can chew someone out all you want, but the reality is that if they are dumb enough to do it in the first place, they sure as hell aren't smart enough to comprehend why you'd be upset about it.

Spend your time on what you can control.
 

deer_shooter

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Yep, I've had it happen. You can chew someone out all you want, but the reality is that if they are dumb enough to do it in the first place, they sure as hell aren't smart enough to comprehend why you'd be upset about it.

Spend your time on what you can control.

Yep, had it happen too. I agree that it is the right thing to do if you see someone else hunting, you should back our or give a wide enough berth so as not to mess up their hunt but not all abide by that.
 

genesis273

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Assuming you were hunting MT public land, I can say that being from NC and hunting public land for years in this state is extremely frustrating. We have 100x less public land with 100x more "hunters"(a little exaggeration there), but it is terrible. I use to always hope that everyone had the same ethics and mindset as I do, but that will never be the case. I shake my head and just chalk it up as "thats hunting public land".
 

Jorgy

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Oh yeah, public land hunting..........sure can be frustrating sometimes. You just have to roll with the situation.

I sure wouldn't recommend arguing with someone that you don't know, especially when you know they are armed.
 

mountainhawks

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Unfortunately not everyone shares the same ethics when it comes to hunting. Good for you to back out and give the guy his space, he obviously lacked the courtesy to appreciate it but I promise it saved you continued headache throughout the day. JLS said it best with "Spend your time on what you can control."
 

Fire_9

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Spend your time on what you can control is definitely the right attitude to have in all aspects of life. I still could have handled the situation a little better by keeping my mouth shut but I'm not very good at that. I couldn't imagine hunting somewhere that this is the norm.
 

Bambistew

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Hunting public land, is what it is. I've had run-ins with plenty of folks, but rarely has it gone south. Usually every time they went somewhere else, of if they were there first I go on about my way and wish them good luck. Matter of fact had this happen earlier this year. If I'm there first I usually suggested another spot to them. Some people don't know where to go or how to hunt a particular area. Give them an option of another place nearby that wouldn't interfere much with your hunt, go somewhere else, or just deal with it.

I had a guy try to run me off the river one time. We showed up at the parking lot about the same time as him, but he had been fishing for a while and was ready to go and took off for the river. We spent about 15 minuets getting ready and headed in. The spot we were fishing was a wilderness area, with a decent trail and access to the river for about 2 miles. It gets some traffic, but there is a lot of area to fish, and the further you go the fewer the fishermen and more plentiful the fish. My favorite area was about a mile down. When we ran into the guy he was fishing near the beginning of the trail, and told us that we could fish behind him as he moved downstream, as he was just about done with the first hole. I said we were planning on going down further and that's when he came unglued...He called me a selfish prick, or something like that, and went on how he was there first and we should deal with it. Us going past him was going to ruin his experience. He was there first so it was his to fish, and we had no right to ruin his fishing! I was quite wide eyed at his response.

I had originally planned to walk past him about a mile or more. There is 4-5 hours worth of fishing in that two miles and not having to hit the same hole for more than about 10 minuets. There was easily 2 hours of fishing or more in that first mile. When he said that it was his because he was there first, I said F-u, and said, "You know what?" "I think we'll fish right here, instead of a mile down." The look on his face was worth it as I cast right next to him. As he was preparing to leave, muttering under his breath, I yelled to my partners, lets head down about a mile or so, this spot is ruined. Haha.

Act like an azzhole and I'll treat you like one.
 
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sbhooper

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A couple years back, a buddy and I were hoofing after some elk that we had glassed on some rim rocks in treacherous, icy country on a late cow hunt. We were a ways up the slope and we noticed that two guys had started up the bottom of the canyon to our east almost running. We scratched and clawed our way up the slope and then it became evident that those two bozos thought that they could circle us and out-run us to the elk. I think that they thought there was no way that we could get to them.

Long story short, we edged our way over icy rocks to the top of a clump of rim rock. I got comfortable and killed a cow at 443 yards just as the two interlopers cracked the ridge on top. We had a good laugh and all they got was one hell of a lot of exercise!

I ran into several good people last year and had a blast hunting with them.
 

Fire_9

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Lewistown, MT
Act like an azzhole and I'll treat you like one.[/QUOTE]

That could go for both parties in this situation...

I fished the coastal rivers in Washington a lot growing up and ran into the same kind of situations. People really get bent our of shape when it comes to their hunting/fishing spots. Sometimes its justified, sometimes it's not.
 

maxx

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Come hunt WI opening rifle season on public ground. The pumpkin army is strong.

I have had it both ways good guys and bad. We typically hunt a military base close to this public ground. It isn't much better but better because they issue limited permits. When I was 18 we didn't get our permits, it was the first time.

My dad and I head off to the public ground. You can try to get away from people but it is very difficult so we typically just go earlier than anyone else and claim our ground. I was set up at 4:00 2 hours before shooting. I bet I flashed off 3-4 different guys. I ended up killing a great buck.

I have hunted that same spot for 10-11 openers since then and I have had some interesting interactions. Once had a guy set up 50 yards next to me. I whistle and he just waved back. I dropped my pants took a dump and went to another spot. Another year I had a guy set up 100 yards directly down the ridge in front of me. I could not hunt because I would have to shoot uphill or at him. I got up and walked to the other side of the ridge and killed a 6 point. I purposely dragged it past the guy that set up on me.

It is frustrating but you get used to it.
 

Jwill

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If the other person doesn't see you and change direction/location I think you should either wait on or approach them to talk over your plan so you're not tripping over each other. Ideally they go somewhere else, but if not, you should try to manage the situation so it doesn't suck for both parties. He may have been an a-hole anyway, but at least you would have taken the high road.
 

SnowyMountaineer

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I had a very strong bull scouted on a remote ridge this fall about 8-9 miles in and off trail. I timed my approach well, hitting the meadows he was in at daylight on the opener. At that moment an outfitter with two clients blew past me on horses, well aware of my presence. I held my tongue, banking on the fact that I could probably still out-hunt them.

I asked where they were going, stayed out of their way, and killed a decent 6x6. They killed nothing that day.

Here's a good reason to treat others well even when you don't feel like it: you never know when you're going to get in a pinch and need a favor. I usually hunt deer and elk solo, and usually 5-10 miles in. It pays to keep bridges intact. Most guides are tools, I just expect it and if they happen to be nice it's a bonus. Feels pretty good to stroll past their camp with a full load, I'm happy to let that do the talking.
 

Fire_9

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Jwill- That would have been the best idea. It's better to have a conversation that to get pissed when they don't read your mind. Much better for both parties.
 

elkantlers

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those two bozos thought that they could circle us and out-run us to the elk.
I got comfortable and killed a cow at 443 yards just as the two interlopers cracked the ridge on top. We had a good laugh and all they got was one hell of a lot of exercise!

Public land, public animals.

I have been in this situation and handled it totally different. I got the other hunters' attention and made contact with them. We worked together and four of us killed cow elk. I was in position on the elk and could have easily shot one and been done. The other Hunters, Including a teenager, would have never had a chance if I had done so. I am still friends with them today.

Most of the time it is better to try to work with them. There are some situations where they can be absolute jerks and then all bets are off and it is every man for them selves.
 

LopeHunter

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Heck, go to AZ and see a chair at every speck of water on public land. Most days, no one shows up but if they do then they act like their family has hunted there for 500 years. Is a mess. Would be better to have a reservation system by lottery for pods of public land that is valid for y days for a valid tag holder. First come, first served with a warm body does not even work as you might have others want to sit the same water hole or ridge top. Public land hunting can be frustrating when are close to a trailhead or road.
 

Pinecricker

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It can be frustrating, but I think its always best to try to make an effort to work with other hunters, especially if you plan on hunting that same spot again. If you're friendly, at least the guy might try to be more accommodating next time, which is not likely if you're antagonistic.

I have had a group of people move in on my primary spot in the last few years, and I was at least able to get them to stop riding their ATV's up the trail. In fact, last season I saw them trying to get another group to stay out of the area on ATV's.

There is nothing I can do to stop them from hunting there, but they have been great about working to stay out of each other's hair, and they are ethical hunters, they are protective of the spot, and they are teaching their kids the same. I'd hate for them to see a bad example and to start following it.
 
H

hnt4life

Guest
It happens! I had been in elk in the evenings in a spot I had hunted for years. One afternoon, I ran into a some fellow hunters at the local convenience store. We even chatted about his hunting pants. Turns out, he passes me on the highway and parks in the exact same spot I was going to hunt only 5 minutes in front of me. I just continued down the road and hunted a different spot. In my head I just wished them luck!

But on the other hand....

There are jackelopes that are arrogant, rude, and confrontational in similar situations. There seems to be an element of elitist, self righteous hunters who will sacrifice moral and ethical behavior towards other hunters just to have another blown chance at some elk.;)
 

Fire_9

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Lewistown, MT
I agree that most people are willing to work with you if you have a civilized conversation with them. I should have stopped him on the ridge and worked out a plan. I by no means felt like I was entitled to hunt that area without any company though. What I don't agree with is a grown man putting on his track shoes and trying to get ahead of when since he showed up late to the party. There should be a mutual respect amongst hunters especially in the wide open spaces of Montana. I love hunting public land for the added element of having to share it with everyone else but some people lose sight of what is important, myself included from time to time.
 
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