Hunting Advice from a 'pro' (not me)

ThunderNocked

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 3, 2020
Messages
517
Location
North Pole, Alaska
FIRST - I'm not the pro I spoke of in the header.
So I was talking to a fairly well trained long range shooter the other day who is a family member and he gave me some pointers that I've been looking for but didn't know what or how to ask.
When shooting - look at the vegetation:
Grass blowing but no tree movement is less than 5mph.
Tree tops starting to sway is 5mph.
Tree tops steadily moving around with more movement in the trees is 8mph.
Trees moving is 10+.

These are obviously In Field 'guide' and not hard and fast rules. Looking at Alaska we don't always have these indicators - thinking specifically about a winter Caribou hunt where there was no trees and all the snow was hard crusted. What other great in the field pointers have you guys gotten to help yourselves out?

At the time of this we were shooting at a gun range in Oregon when I was visiting this summer - range was 5200+ feet elevation, it was 102 degrees and he was estimating an 5mph wind with gusts to 8. I had asked him how he was estimating so we sat and discussed several ideas like this. Thought I's share and see if anybody else had anything like this!
 
Last edited:

Dan O

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2014
Messages
937
Location
Seeley Lake, Mt
While shooting BPCR silhouette mirage is a great option if conditions are right. Clouds will make it tuff to see. If you can see it you can tell wind direction and changes as they develop.
The conditions closer to you will have the most effect at distance so don't ignore them. I agree watch the vegetation both near and about half way to your target. These conditions will have the most effect on your bullet. The best way to learn is to spent time practicing in the wind and learning your rifle.
 

ThunderNocked

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 3, 2020
Messages
517
Location
North Pole, Alaska
@Dan O Good! Thanks for that too. In a barren landscape I like high ridges in Alaska in March I was thinking about the animals hair too -the long hairs on their necks could give some indicators as well.
 

Dan O

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2014
Messages
937
Location
Seeley Lake, Mt
@Dan O Good! Thanks for that too. In a barren landscape I like high ridges in Alaska in March I was thinking about the animals hair too -the long hairs on their necks could give some indicators as well.
I agree any thing that reacts to wind is a good indicator of the conditions at that location. The trick is to see what is happening between you and your target. That is where the most effect will occur to your bullet or arrow. At longer distances a complete 180 degree change in wind is not uncommon. Then toss in the angle of the wind is a whole other thing to figure out. It's one heck of a learning curve. I still have not figured it out LOL
 

MTLabrador

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2020
Messages
2,620
I agree any thing that reacts to wind is a good indicator of the conditions at that location. The trick is to see what is happening between you and your target. That is where the most effect will occur to your bullet or arrow. At longer distances a complete 180 degree change in wind is not uncommon. Then toss in the angle of the wind is a whole other thing to figure out. It's one heck of a learning curve. I still have not figured it out LOL
That’s what trips me up and why I get nervous about taking longer shots in the mountains, especially across a canyon. I decided not to pull the trigger on a really nice bear at a little under 500 this spring. 5ish mph wind at me, dead calm at the bear, and trees shaking in between.
 

ThunderNocked

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 3, 2020
Messages
517
Location
North Pole, Alaska
Wind direction I was advised to add on my sheet distance/MOA adjustment/90* Wind drift at 10 MPH.
Then if it is straight to or away from you 0 correction, straight across (90*) full correction.
so 45* is half correction and if in between either quarter or three quarter.

Obviously need to spend time at the range testing this stuff out. I love my rifle and have been trying to shoot quite a bit more. I need to find some good longer range areas - some guys here shoot across the river because nobody lives over there and some of it is in the military's life fire area so not much out there to worry about.

What other tips people have? And not just about wind but gauging distance or anything that is good to help process information and give you the advantage.

I'm a terrible judge of distance so I carry a Rangefinder and I carry 'smoke' for wind direction. But this is all knowledge that with some testing and practice can all help.

@Doublecluck - Kestrel is an option for sure. I'm not planning to shoot far enough to really need one but it isn't a bad idea. It would be good information to confirm what you are seeing farther out there as you look for the wind changes etc.
 

mtmuley

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2009
Messages
8,990
Location
montana
That’s what trips me up and why I get nervous about taking longer shots in the mountains, especially across a canyon. I decided not to pull the trigger on a really nice bear at a little under 500 this spring. 5ish mph wind at me, dead calm at the bear, and trees shaking in between.
I think reading the wind is an inexact science at best. mtmuley
 

Dan O

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2014
Messages
937
Location
Seeley Lake, Mt
In silhouette I shoot a Shiloh Sharps 45-70 model 74. I primarily use a MVA period scope in 6 power. I shoot a Creedmoor style 535 grain bullet. The MV is 1225 FPS.

This rifle and load I use in silhouette, The steel animals are at the following distances. Chickens 200 meters shot offhand, Pigs 300 meters shot off cross sticks, Turkeys 380 meters off cross sticks and Rams at 500 meters.

I've shot BPTR "Creedmoor" also with this same set up. The ranges are 800 yards, 900 yards & 1000 yards.

The effects of wind will drive you crazy trying to read it and catch the changes, One thing dealing with the heavy slow bullet, head wind with cause you to shoot higher because it causes lift after hitting a berm.

I think the faster loads most hunting rifle use are not effected nearly as much as the old and slow is. I don't know if there is much change with head or tail winds. I've not tested this I'm sure there are some on this site that may have that answer.
 

ThunderNocked

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 3, 2020
Messages
517
Location
North Pole, Alaska
Yeah shooting 280 Ackley Improved currently factory Nosler 140 Gr AccuBonds at 3100 FPS. It’s a slick round. But need to shoot in conditions to replicate and see affects.
 

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
97,597
Messages
1,489,777
Members
30,740
Latest member
DadBodHero
Top