Yeti

Help me pick a new pack

300_WSM

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Sep 21, 2021
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Barneys is unbeatable for moose packing. Have one we reserve for just that.

Went with a Kuiu Pro LT5500 this year though, and I know there are a lot who hate on it, but I fell in love with it. Way more adjustable and comfortable than a Mystery Ranch Metcalf that I had. Packed a full sheep 5 miles back to base, and then half a caribou 6 miles back to camp. Wasn't as comfy as full pack frame like a barneys, but it was very doable. I use the 5500 from day pack up to 4 day spike outs.
 

Bsquad

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Sep 22, 2021
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Being new to packs, I ended up with a Gregory 65L stout. It was hard to pass up at $48 gander outdoors going out of business price. From what I gathered, the pricier packs have tons more padding? What did the new pack do the Gregory didn't? Curious because I don't know what I don't know.
 

wllm

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Dec 9, 2015
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Being new to packs, I ended up with a Gregory 65L stout. It was hard to pass up at $48 gander outdoors going out of business price. From what I gathered, the pricier packs have tons more padding? What did the new pack do the Gregory didn't? Curious because I don't know what I don't know.
Meatshelf + weight capacity

You will be fine for a bit but you will have to put meat in your pack so you will need to do an extra load every time you shoot something. Also you will need to be careful when you put your pack on, the pack is meat to carry 50lb max not 150 so the stitching everywhere won't be as robust and might fail if you put too much strain on it.

When you load it up heavy (over 50lbs) don't try to hoist it onto your back, put it on on the ground and stand up.
 

Bsquad

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Sep 22, 2021
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47
Meatshelf + weight capacity

You will be fine for a bit but you will have to put meat in your pack so you will need to do an extra load every time you shoot something. Also you will need to be careful when you put your pack on, the pack is meat to carry 50lb max not 150 so the stitching everywhere won't be as robust and might fail if you put too much strain on it.

When you load it up heavy (over 50lbs) don't try to hoist it onto your back, put it on on the ground and stand up.
Good info. Thank you. So, you're saying that lifetime warranty will probably be used hah.
 

wllm

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Good info. Thank you. So, you're saying that lifetime warranty will probably be used hah.
Not necessarily... just

My buddy has packed out 2 caribou and a goat in his hyperlite (~100lb loads each time) and that pack as a similar weight capacity. Just be careful with the straps.

I'd also take a gregory over a eberlestock any day of the week for backpack hunting.
 
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Bsquad

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Sep 22, 2021
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Not necessarily... just

My buddy has packed out 2 caribou and a goat in his hyperlite (~100lb loads each time) and that pack as a similar weight capacity. Just be careful with the straps.

I'd also take a gregory over a eberlestock any day of the week for backpack hunting.
That's kind of what I was thinking too. Not familiar with that brand, I'm familiar with Stone glacier, MR, Kifaru, ect. They look $350+, low end of the high end packs?
 

wllm

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That's kind of what I was thinking too. Not familiar with that brand, I'm familiar with Stone glacier, MR, Kifaru, ect. They look $350+, low end of the high end packs?
Hyperlite is an awesome ultralite backpacking/packrafting company.

Eberlestock just sucks.
 

Beau_G

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Apr 6, 2020
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Bakersfield, CA
Being new to packs, I ended up with a Gregory 65L stout. It was hard to pass up at $48 gander outdoors going out of business price. From what I gathered, the pricier packs have tons more padding? What did the new pack do the Gregory didn't? Curious because I don't know what I don't know.
The Gregory pack will work just fine, especially if it fits you well. I was using a Gregory Stout 75L pack that I scored on a closeout deal. It was a little too big and I always battled it sliding down on my hips and putting too much weight on my shoulders. I suffered through the pain for years on many backpack trips and even packed out a few elk with it.

I now have the ability to purchase something that's designed for my needs. The Stone Glacier has a much more form-fitting design and higher quality waist belt and shoulder straps. It hugs your back better and has a lot more rigidity than my old Gregory pack. It also has more compression straps and the ability to really tighten things up. Heavy loads feel much more secure in the SG. My Gregory pack always felt a little "saggy" with any real weight in it. Plus, the load shelf is a major selling point for a hunting pack as the cu. inches get sparse when you are packing out an elk, deer, or pig by yourself.

The SG pack was a major improvement for me, but if you are just starting out the extra $550 you would spend on a SG may not be worth it. If you have a laundry list of essential gear to purchase, I would recommend sticking with the Gregory for now (assuming it fits you OK) and spend the extra money on gear that'll improve your odds of getting an animal (e.g. optics). You can always upgrade you pack down the road.
 

Beau_G

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I meant to post this a while back too, but never got around to it...

The ability to cinch this pack down is pretty impressive! Here's my pack loaded for a 2-day backcountry hunt: a light jacket, 2 days of food, 4L of water, jet boil, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, spotting scope, tripod, small thermarest for glassing, game bags, kill kit (knives, saw, etc.), and a handful of other knick-knacks (head lamp, toiletries, first aid, etc.). I think this weighed around 45-ish lbs, if I remember correctly. The compactness really surprised me!
20210813_104517.jpg
 

YoungGun

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Feb 7, 2014
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Bozeman
I meant to post this a while back too, but never got around to it...

The ability to cinch this pack down is pretty impressive! Here's my pack loaded for a 2-day backcountry hunt: a light jacket, 2 days of food, 4L of water, jet boil, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, spotting scope, tripod, small thermarest for glassing, game bags, kill kit (knives, saw, etc.), and a handful of other knick-knacks (head lamp, toiletries, first aid, etc.). I think this weighed around 45-ish lbs, if I remember correctly. The compactness really surprised me!
View attachment 195379
The Stone Glacier certainly compact down very well and carry their weight well. Congrats on the new pack.
 

Bsquad

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Sep 22, 2021
Messages
47
The Gregory pack will work just fine, especially if it fits you well. I was using a Gregory Stout 75L pack that I scored on a closeout deal. It was a little too big and I always battled it sliding down on my hips and putting too much weight on my shoulders. I suffered through the pain for years on many backpack trips and even packed out a few elk with it.

I now have the ability to purchase something that's designed for my needs. The Stone Glacier has a much more form-fitting design and higher quality waist belt and shoulder straps. It hugs your back better and has a lot more rigidity than my old Gregory pack. It also has more compression straps and the ability to really tighten things up. Heavy loads feel much more secure in the SG. My Gregory pack always felt a little "saggy" with any real weight in it. Plus, the load shelf is a major selling point for a hunting pack as the cu. inches get sparse when you are packing out an elk, deer, or pig by yourself.

The SG pack was a major improvement for me, but if you are just starting out the extra $550 you would spend on a SG may not be worth it. If you have a laundry list of essential gear to purchase, I would recommend sticking with the Gregory for now (assuming it fits you OK) and spend the extra money on gear that'll improve your odds of getting an animal (e.g. optics). You can always upgrade you pack down the road.
So, I used to wonder why guys spend $4-5-600 on a pack or random do-dads. A couple camping trips and caribou hunting, I now see why. $59 Simmons spotting scope... almost useless eye relief and worse tripod. Sometimes the cheapest solution ends up being th most expensive. The 65 I have does fit OK and 35-45lbs is about it's limit.
I've hunted deer and turkey, nothing where I'm having to pack in/out though...so some learning is happening.
Thanks for the input.
 

lbaldrid

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Jan 16, 2018
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Location
Nebraska
So, I used to wonder why guys spend $4-5-600 on a pack or random do-dads. A couple camping trips and caribou hunting, I now see why. $59 Simmons spotting scope... almost useless eye relief and worse tripod. Sometimes the cheapest solution ends up being th most expensive. The 65 I have does fit OK and 35-45lbs is about it's limit.
I've hunted deer and turkey, nothing where I'm having to pack in/out though...so some learning is happening.
Thanks for the input.
I used to have a cheap frame pack from Cabelas that worked fine when I was younger and broke. I opted this year to splurge on an Initial Ascent pack. I understand most of the people on this thread have already made their decision/purchase, but I would highly recommend looking into the IA packs. Used the IA4K pack system for my NM Gila elk hunt this year and it performed flawlessly. Incredibly comfortable and comes with a meat pannier that allowed for the carrying of a 1/4 and the head. My buddy has the same pack and he had a 1/4 and the backstraps and tenderloins in his pack. It is also compatible with their other bag systems for shorter/longer hunts. The IA4K was perfect for a 6 day hunt that also doubles as a great day pack spike hunting from camp. Made in Idaho by a couple of guys. Their customer service is second to none.

 

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Bsquad

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Joined
Sep 22, 2021
Messages
47
I used to have a cheap frame pack from Cabelas that worked fine when I was younger and broke. I opted this year to splurge on an Initial Ascent pack. I understand most of the people on this thread have already made their decision/purchase, but I would highly recommend looking into the IA packs. Used the IA4K pack system for my NM Gila elk hunt this year and it performed flawlessly. Incredibly comfortable and comes with a meat pannier that allowed for the carrying of a 1/4 and the head. My buddy has the same pack and he had a 1/4 and the backstraps and tenderloins in his pack. It is also compatible with their other bag systems for shorter/longer hunts. The IA4K was perfect for a 6 day hunt that also doubles as a great day pack spike hunting from camp. Made in Idaho by a couple of guys. Their customer service is second to none.

That does look like a really useful pack, holy crap storage for days. The price isn't terrible, vs some of the bigger brands.
 

lbaldrid

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Jan 16, 2018
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Location
Nebraska
That does look like a really useful pack, holy crap storage for days. The price isn't terrible, vs some of the bigger brands.
The carbon frame makes it really light weight. Bad preparation on my part but 4 days before my hunt, I tried on my buddy's pack and was blown away at the comfort compared to mine. I called them and spoke with one of the co-founders directly and he had one shipped to me that afternoon. Hand written note in the box with it and texted back and forth with him after the hunt to thank him. Awesome guys.
 

yakimanoob

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Joined
Oct 10, 2021
Messages
59
Here's the deal - ya gotta try them on, preferably with a load.

...

Try
Them
On!

I didn't read the whole thread. Just adding my vote for trying them on.

Personally, I use a Mystery Ranch Terraframe 50, and I giggle every time I think about how they don't advertise it as a "hunting" pack.
 

Steve16

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Nov 6, 2021
Messages
15
I have two stone glacier packs, evo and avail and am happy with them.

Looking on info on how tomake
Evo lid a fanny pack.
 

Cdmor89

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Nov 11, 2021
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I have a great backpack for all day hunts (Cabela's SHE), but would like to find a fanny pack. I am small 5'4/97lbs and all I find are ones that are too big, or the smaller ones I find are not a quiet material. Open to youth sizes, my pants are for youth.
 

TimeOnTarget

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Feb 13, 2015
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1,294
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SD
I used to have a cheap frame pack from Cabelas that worked fine when I was younger and broke. I opted this year to splurge on an Initial Ascent pack. I understand most of the people on this thread have already made their decision/purchase, but I would highly recommend looking into the IA packs. Used the IA4K pack system for my NM Gila elk hunt this year and it performed flawlessly. Incredibly comfortable and comes with a meat pannier that allowed for the carrying of a 1/4 and the head. My buddy has the same pack and he had a 1/4 and the backstraps and tenderloins in his pack. It is also compatible with their other bag systems for shorter/longer hunts. The IA4K was perfect for a 6 day hunt that also doubles as a great day pack spike hunting from camp. Made in Idaho by a couple of guys. Their customer service is second to none.

I really liked the look of this pack until I saw how short the frame is.

EDIT: Just realized that says torso length, Not frame length.
 
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