Game Carts....

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Deerslayer

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So who uses one, or has used one and what do you think?

...I bought one about 5 years ago, and used it a lot in a walk in only area back home, but have yet to use it here, and probably won't if I have the ponies along. But they can be a life-saver....or at least they were with us.

Anybody else have experience with them?
DS
 

riverswild

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Jun 22, 2001
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OlyWa
About 5 yrs ago some elk hunters let me use theirs to pack out a bear for my wife..It was great. My 6 yr old son was able to take the bear out on the gravel roads with no problem.

We then started useing wheelbarrows...worked pretty darn good. But early last year the ol' lady bought me a game cart and it is great. We used it on a bear she shot last year.

I am hoping to get some use out of it this year.
 
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Deerslayer

Guest
Delw...most wilderness areas prevent using them as they are a wheeled vehicle, but pretty much every where else you can get one in they work great. The big tires have great clearance, but you need some sort of trail or road or it will be tough going, unless the forest is real open.

Riverwild....your hell on the bears man!
What state are you from?
The wheelbarrow works, but is heavier, bulkier and doesn't have the balance a game cart has. You did good spending the $100 for the real deal! ;)
DS
 

Elkhunter

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Dec 20, 2000
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Jackson, Wyoming
I have never used one. I know hunters who have used them and have heard good response about them, as long as, like DS mentioned, there is some sort of trail to use it on. Without a trail, or nice section of land, they are Heck to use.
 

riverswild

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Jun 22, 2001
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OlyWa
Deerslayer - We have a pretty good string of bears going.. We typically hunt the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state.

This year I will be hunting closer to my home town of Olympia as we just had a baby last week and I have a new job that is killing me with overtime.

You are right about the wheelbarrows...we would put a sling rope around the tire supports and one guy on each end would pull while one guy would push and steer. Worked great on even the rockiest(sp) of roads. All three of us felt like we were slacking and thus compensating would almost turn into a trot.

The one good thing with the barrow was that I could leave it stashed up there...but the cart fits fine ontop of the Ford Wagon....
 
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Deerslayer

Guest
Riverswild...I too have a passion for bears, and have taken 8 in the last few years, but this will be the first year in many I won't be hunting them....no time this year, but I have a couple of hunts planned for next year already.

Just keep loading the "wagon" down, they will all be out buying them one before it is over with! :D
DS
 

Blacktail boy

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Jan 4, 2001
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Silverdale,WA,USA
I started using my mountain bike about 10 years ago, Ive hauled a lot of mine and my dads game over the years including a couple big bears . It works great. Put the body cavity over the seat , tie the head, horns and front legs over the handle bars and tie the back legs off the to rear axle area and just push it out .it even has breaks for going down hills . The only draw back if you mind it is you have to lean the load into you getting you a little bloody sometimes but it doesnt bother me.
 
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Deerslayer

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Awsome Blacktail!.......never thought of using a mountain bike for big game hauling, although I have used my extensively for turkey hunting "Back in".
DS
 

Ithaca 37

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Mar 4, 2001
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Home of the free, Land of the brave
I've used my mountain bike for hauling out meat a few times. It works great. Especially if you do as much butchering as possible first. I've also loaded about 60 pounds of meat on my pack frame and rode the bike out. It's real easy if the trail isn't too bad and keeping your balance isn't a problem. The gun gets strapped on to the pack frame, too.
 

riverswild

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Jun 22, 2001
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OlyWa
Blacktailboy- That was my plan to a 'T', then we got the wheelbarrow so I never had to use my bike. Then my bike was stolen...bummer.

How hard is it to clean all the blood off the bike? Any rust?

I once saw my father make a pack out of a 180 lb blacktail, throw it on his back, climb onto a little Honda 80 motorcycle and take off....wobblin down the tracks...
 

Blacktail boy

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Jan 4, 2001
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Silverdale,WA,USA
Yeah it will rust, especially where I live.
I just hose it off after im done , maybe a soapy sponge. I dont ride mine in though, I push it in to where I will be doing most of my hunting and hide it in the bushes early in the season. I would rather walk a few miles then ride, (as I am at the ripe old age of 31) riding a bike on dirt roads in the dark doesnt seem that safe to me anymore.
Ive pushed out up to 300 lb bears with little effort, for me its the only way to go.
Always remember though , there is always the possibility of trashing your bike , Ive ruined one before and my current one is on its last season . you can usually get a really nice bike that may have cost $300 new for $50 at a garage sale . for this price you can afford to trash one every few years.
 

riverswild

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Jun 22, 2001
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OlyWa
Blacktail boy - I hear ya about riding bikes anymore. I am almost 33 and my rear end doesn't like the seat anymore.
I had a bike with dual suspension and it rode real well. I also use a headlamp for riding in the dark. Worked great.

You can get cheap dual suspenion bikes for about $125 now.
 

riverswild

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Jun 22, 2001
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OlyWa
Got to use mine last night....well actually my son did all the pulling...I just squeezed the trigger...

I love my cart!
 

Jim in AZ

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Jul 13, 2001
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Arizona
I use the Whitetail cart from Bass Pro Shops (I think that's the right name, it's the one with no solid axle so it's got 12" ground clearance). I use it primarily for work to haul gear into remote areas. I like the cart pretty much but I had to change the wheels. The solid wheels jarred the equipment too much. I ended up putting wheelbarrow wheels on it (it required a few minor modifications). By keeping the inflation pressure a little low, it acted like shock absorbers and worked fine. The only other drawback was that you have to make sure you've got more weight in front of the wheels than behind. Otherwise, it tries to fold itself up for storage when you take off! :(
All in all, a very rugged, easy to use cart and the price was okay (I think it's about $125). I routinely drag about 100 pounds of reasonably sensitive electronic gear around the desert with it. I can't wait to get an elk on it!
Jim in AZ
 
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