Boars, pigs in Montana?

WyoDoug

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2019
Messages
555
Location
Cheyenne, Wyoming
This would be a mistake. I have people that offered to pay me to come and shoot feral pigs that are destroying their fields. They are not native to the system so they do damage the local ecologic balance. Problem is what I was offered in terms of pay would not cover what it cost me to actually hunt the animals down or I would have.

I also seen issues with antelope in area 107 where I used to hunt in Colorado. A herd of antelope can flatten an entire field of wheat in a hurry and cost a single farmer thousands of dollars in lost yields. So can feral pigs. Pigs uproot just about everything and I have seen huge swaths of land rendered useless to grazing or other agricultural uses because of single sounder of pigs. Note that names for groups of pigs technically changes based on sex and age, but in Texas they are referred to by most trappers and farmers I have met as a sounder. Feral pigs also defecate all over everything and the only way to clean that ground up is to grade it and bring clean dirt in which is not usually feasible at all. It takes a long time to cure pig manure to make it useful as fertilizer.
 

wytex

Well-known member
Joined
May 17, 2016
Messages
1,732
Location
Wyoming
I wish Montana luck if they move in. Hopefully the lack of the kind of thick cover they thrive in down south will make them easier to find and take care of.
We've been dealing with them for 35 years or so in Texas. Hunting and trapping keeps them from taking over. Trapping is by far a better method for population control.
 

WyoDoug

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2019
Messages
555
Location
Cheyenne, Wyoming
I doubt if feral swine can survive the harsh winters. I think that's the main reason they have not spread from Texas north up to Colorado yet.
 

Gerald Martin

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 3, 2009
Messages
3,944
All part of Trump’s plan to introduce Rooshian boars to help win 2020. Collisions and collaboration! I hope Anderson Cooper keeps a close eye on this one.
 

WyoDoug

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2019
Messages
555
Location
Cheyenne, Wyoming
Please
All part of Trump’s plan to introduce Rooshian boars to help win 2020. Collisions and collaboration! I hope Anderson Cooper keeps a close eye on this one.
I for one would appreciate the disappearance of political comments. This issue has nothing to do with politics.
 

wytex

Well-known member
Joined
May 17, 2016
Messages
1,732
Location
Wyoming
Eurasian or Russian wild hogs will have no issues with the cold. Feral domestic hogs may be a bit different. They will loose ear tips and tails. The russians have denser hair . We see a marked difference in russian blood strains and feral domestic hogs on the family place. The Russian bloodlines have denser hair with grizzled tips , longer straight tails, smaller ears- not floppy, longer legs, and a longer snout. Feral domestic hogs do not have the dense hair for cold weather, at least not the ones we've dealt with.
In any case you don't want them in Montana.
 

Deano2525

New member
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
Messages
14
its tru that those hogs caused tons of damage and wreak havoc on row crops and cattle land. I’m in a state that already has a ton of hogs. They trap with permission. But for a recreational hunter that does own not farm or ranch.

It’s pig season everyday here! I know our state is all messed up. And I would not introduce hogs to a area that doesn’t have them. That being said spot. And stalk hog hunting is a blast!111260111261111262

And I say again it’s pig season everyday.
I know it’s considered a pest but I make a fantastic chili verde out of those pests.
 

RockinU

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 27, 2019
Messages
258
Location
Texas
You don't want them, no matter how good you think they taste. I don't have a clue how many hogs I've killed over the years, trapping, hunting with dogs, baiting, spot and stalk, aerial, while it's been many hundreds, I know guys who are in the thousands, and it hasn't mattered, we're still losing ground, figuratively and literally.

Some want to celebrate the year round nature of them without considering the damage they do, and the deleterious effects they have on our native wildlife, and the opportunities they are costing us with things that are supposed to be here. Give me the damn magic wand, I'll wave it.
 

NEWHunter

Active member
Joined
Jul 15, 2018
Messages
255
Location
Brookfield, WI
Eurasian or Russian wild hogs will have no issues with the cold. Feral domestic hogs may be a bit different. They will loose ear tips and tails. The russians have denser hair . We see a marked difference in russian blood strains and feral domestic hogs on the family place. The Russian bloodlines have denser hair with grizzled tips , longer straight tails, smaller ears- not floppy, longer legs, and a longer snout. Feral domestic hogs do not have the dense hair for cold weather, at least not the ones we've dealt with.
In any case you don't want them in Montana.
Notice any difference in taste between the two?
 

LCH

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2013
Messages
2,989
Location
Southern Indiana
Notice any difference in taste between the two?
I've eaten the high % Eurasian boar we have around here, and the more feral type from AL and TX. The feral pig type are fattier, especially in the front end, but I've found flavor to be similar across the board and pretty close to store-bought pork, just way leaner.
 

wytex

Well-known member
Joined
May 17, 2016
Messages
1,732
Location
Wyoming
I agree LCH, however some years the fat layer is amazing on the Eurasian ones too. I find the flavor a little more nutty where we hunt, lots of acorns and pecans.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LCH
Top