Caribou Gear

American Wildlife and Public Lands Legacy Act

ElkFever2

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Messages
3,845
Location
Iowa
OK, tear it to shreds...

American Wildlife and Public Lands Legacy Act

Among nations, The United States has a unique pair of national treasures: our abundant multi-use public lands, and wildlife held in the public trust. These resources face many threats, and their future is far from secure. A series of Acts throughout our country’s history has preserved our wildlife and public lands thus far: the creation of national forests, grasslands, monuments, and parks, the Lacey Act, the Wilderness Act, the Wildlife Restoration Act, and many others. A new Act is needed to address threats to public land and wildlife that have come to the forefront of public consciousness in the 21st century.

Social media has dramatically changed the way that the public interacts with wildlife and public land. Market hunting of the 19th century has been replaced by corporations incentivizing individuals kill wild animals to produce media content featuring corporate products. Interest among the public in recreating on public lands has increased dramatically in recent years. In order to better facilitate the public’s access and enjoyment of public lands and wildlife, corporate extraction of these resources needs to be reduced. To this end, the following provisions will take effect:

-All federal lands within 5 miles of a public road shall be legally accessible by foot via a marked footpath. The footpath will be along the shortest route from a public road accessible by foot.

-Survey markers shall be installed on all federal lands adjoined by a corner. All persons shall enjoy access to said lands on foot by crossing within 4 feet of the survey marker. Fenced corners shall be accessible via turnstile, steps, or similar installed mechanism.

-The annual bag limit per licensed hunter per calendar year for the following animals native to North America is as follows: 5 whitetail deer, 2 mule deer, 2 elk, 4 black bear, 3 antelope, 1 wild sheep, 1 mountain goat, 1 bison, and 1 moose. The possession limit is twice the allowable bag limit. Individual states may further restrict harvest. This provision does not apply to federally-defined subsidence hunters. This provision does not apply to animals harvested via depredation permits on private land.

-No new domestic sheep grazing permits on federal land located within historic wild sheep habitat will be approved.

-No permit or tag to kill an animal native to North America shall be auctioned, sold for more than $5,000, or granted as a gift to an individual or organization.

-No competition involved the killing of animals native to North America shall be held, organized, or sponsored if prizes, gifts, or compensation exceeding $100 in value are distributed to the participants.

-Video filming on public land for commercial purposes is prohibited.

-An excise tax of 11% shall be collected from the sale of all ski and snowboard equipment, hiking equipment, backpacking equipment, mountaineering equipment, off-road cycling equipment, and climbing equipment. These taxes will be used to fund the provisions of this Act.
 

Lilhowie83

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 19, 2020
Messages
443
Location
Southeast Idaho
OK, tear it to shreds...

American Wildlife and Public Lands Legacy Act

Among nations, The United States has a unique pair of national treasures: our abundant multi-use public lands, and wildlife held in the public trust. These resources face many threats, and their future is far from secure. A series of Acts throughout our country’s history has preserved our wildlife and public lands thus far: the creation of national forests, grasslands, monuments, and parks, the Lacey Act, the Wilderness Act, the Wildlife Restoration Act, and many others. A new Act is needed to address threats to public land and wildlife that have come to the forefront of public consciousness in the 21st century.

Social media has dramatically changed the way that the public interacts with wildlife and public land. Market hunting of the 19th century has been replaced by corporations incentivizing individuals kill wild animals to produce media content featuring corporate products. Interest among the public in recreating on public lands has increased dramatically in recent years. In order to better facilitate the public’s access and enjoyment of public lands and wildlife, corporate extraction of these resources needs to be reduced. To this end, the following provisions will take effect:

-All federal lands within 5 miles of a public road shall be legally accessible by foot via a marked footpath. The footpath will be along the shortest route from a public road accessible by foot.

-Survey markers shall be installed on all federal lands adjoined by a corner. All persons shall enjoy access to said lands on foot by crossing within 4 feet of the survey marker. Fenced corners shall be accessible via turnstile, steps, or similar installed mechanism.

-The annual bag limit per licensed hunter per calendar year for the following animals native to North America is as follows: 5 whitetail deer, 2 mule deer, 2 elk, 4 black bear, 3 antelope, 1 wild sheep, 1 mountain goat, 1 bison, and 1 moose. The possession limit is twice the allowable bag limit. Individual states may further restrict harvest. This provision does not apply to federally-defined subsidence hunters. This provision does not apply to animals harvested via depredation permits on private land.

-No new domestic sheep grazing permits on federal land located within historic wild sheep habitat will be approved.

-No permit or tag to kill an animal native to North America shall be auctioned, sold for more than $5,000, or granted as a gift to an individual or organization.

-No competition involved the killing of animals native to North America shall be held, organized, or sponsored if prizes, gifts, or compensation exceeding $100 in value are distributed to the participants.

-Video filming on public land for commercial purposes is prohibited.

-An excise tax of 11% shall be collected from the sale of all ski and snowboard equipment, hiking equipment, backpacking equipment, mountaineering equipment, off-road cycling equipment, and climbing equipment. These taxes will be used to fund the provisions of this Act.
I like everything except the limit on the auction tags. Although I am not a fan of auction tags, I think they are important for species like sheep where there is not enough in tag sales to go towards conservation of these species. There may be a better way but I don't know what it is.

I especially like your last item on the excise tax on all outdoor gear.
 

ajricketts

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 19, 2016
Messages
2,204
Location
East TN
- Except not for profit entities, video filming on public land for commercial purposes is prohibited.
 

wllm1313

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2015
Messages
14,049
Location
Boston
- Except not for profit entities, video filming on public land for commercial purposes is prohibited.
I’m definitely not going to vote to end;
Ski movies
Bike films
Kayaking
Climbing

And or go to war with the entire entertainment industry/ try to take on IG/ FB.

Hunting shows are a tiny sliver of the content that is filmed on public lands.

Personally I like watching that content, and it’s one of the only revenue streams many folks have access to that allow them to live in those areas.
 

ElkFever2

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Messages
3,845
Location
Iowa
I’m definitely not going to vote to end;
Ski movies
Bike films
Kayaking
Climbing

And or go to war with the entire entertainment industry/ try to take on IG/ FB.

Hunting shows are a tiny sliver of the content that is filmed on public lands.

Personally I like watching that content, and it’s one of the only revenue streams many folks have access to that allow them to live in those areas.
Ok so the no filming on public land for commercial purposes is totally untenable. Maybe beef up enforcement of film permits? It seems a ton of profit is being extracted from our public resources with only a few by-the-book operators like Randy actually obtaining film permits.

Any other ideas to curb “killing for content” on public land other than federal bag limits?
 

Bambistew

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 10, 2002
Messages
6,701
Location
Chugiak, AK
Multiple use lands, but make it for hunters only?

Zero percent chance of any of those things happening in my lifetime. I like some of the ideas, though. The bag limit should be 2-3 animals total, end the stupid 8 state safari raping. The fact that people shoot truckloads of game because it's legal is just greed, especially on public ground.
 

Gerald Martin

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 3, 2009
Messages
6,923
Ok so the no filming on public land for commercial purposes is totally untenable. Maybe beef up enforcement of film permits? It seems a ton of profit is being extracted from our public resources with only a few by-the-book operators like Randy actually obtaining film permits.

Any other ideas to curb “killing for content” on public land other than federal bag limits?
Enforcement and enacting laws to curb greed will always be behind the curve.

Changing behavior through changing people’s hearts and culture is always going to be more effective than trying to eliminate the tools we think are harmful.

It’s also a lot more work.
 

Jbaldwin40

Active member
Joined
Dec 10, 2021
Messages
66
I generally like most of your proposals. I am on the fence about the federal government being involved with bag limits. The ideas you have proposed are appealing to the hunting community. As you are probably aware, past attempts to pass a " Backpack tax" have been strongly opposed by large outdoor recreation companies and that was for a 5% excise tax. I think for an act to be successful, it would have to include more language to attract other outdoor recreationists.
I am also opposed to any hunting competition regardless of amount of prize money. It is just bad optics. Hunting competitions can damage our PR with the non hunting public.
 

BuzzH

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2001
Messages
13,928
Location
Laramie, WY
The season bag limit is a joke. What happens, when after going tagless for a decade you draw elk in Arizona, new Mexico and Colorado in the same year? What happens if you draw 3 states for mule deer? Or get lucky and snag 2 ram tags?

Take one away?

Yeah, not happening
 

Jbaldwin40

Active member
Joined
Dec 10, 2021
Messages
66
The season bag limit is a joke. What happens, when after going tagless for a decade you draw elk in Arizona, new Mexico and Colorado in the same year? What happens if you draw 3 states for mule deer? Or get lucky and snag 2 ram tags?

Take one away?

Yeah, not happening
Good point. That pushed me off the fence regarding federal government regulation for bag limits. Let the states set them.
 

np307

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 25, 2018
Messages
616
Location
North Carolina
-The annual bag limit per licensed hunter per calendar year for the following animals native to North America is as follows: 5 whitetail deer, 2 mule deer, 2 elk, 4 black bear, 3 antelope, 1 wild sheep, 1 mountain goat, 1 bison, and 1 moose. The possession limit is twice the allowable bag limit. Individual states may further restrict harvest. This provision does not apply to federally-defined subsidence hunters. This provision does not apply to animals harvested via depredation permits on private land.
Tell me you've know absolutely nothing about the Southeast without telling me you know absolutely nothing about the Southeast.

Our STATE bag limit on whitetails is 6. Theres a reason why it is the individual states who set bag limits, not the feds.

I have issues with other provisions but this one was too glaring not to comment on.
 

Treeshark

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
565
Location
Wisconsin
I like this, did you come up with it Elkfever?

Can’t disagree with any of it except perhaps the filming part (may need tweaking).
 

wllm1313

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2015
Messages
14,049
Location
Boston
The season bag limit is a joke. What happens, when after going tagless for a decade you draw elk in Arizona, new Mexico and Colorado in the same year? What happens if you draw 3 states for mule deer? Or get lucky and snag 2 ram tags?

Take one away?

Yeah, not happening

Perhaps if this limit existed people would plan around it and therefore the issue you described wouldn’t happen. 🤷‍♂️

Also if it’s a bag limit than you could hold the tags and hunt them?

In your example CO is pref points state so you could turn your tag back in and get all of your points back and then draw the next year.

All that said I’m not sure how much impact that rule would have, I wonder how many people are actually killing 2+ bulls on public land every year.
 

Carnage2011

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 28, 2012
Messages
1,362
Location
Whitehall, MT
Why do you guys care if someone wants to hunt multiple states? With the exception of CO, they’d have to draw the tag so why does it matter? Rather than limit those that want to hunt multiple states, maybe you should find a way to hunt multiple states yourself. If it’s a jealousy thing then that’s a personal problem. There is no biological reason to limit how many states people hunt…
 

Carnage2011

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 28, 2012
Messages
1,362
Location
Whitehall, MT
Perhaps if this limit existed people would plan around it and therefore the issue you described wouldn’t happen. 🤷‍♂️

Also if it’s a bag limit than you could hold the tags and hunt them?

In your example CO is pref points state so you could turn your tag back in and get all of your points back and then draw the next year.

All that said I’m not sure how much impact that rule would have, I wonder how many people are actually killing 2+ bulls on public land every year.
How do you plan on drawing an AZ elk tag unless you have max points? Or Utah? Or Nevada? Or any sheep tag for that matter? It’s not a matter of planning.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
100,305
Messages
1,583,912
Members
31,480
Latest member
HamBone1127
Top