Unforgettable books..

onpoint

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Feb 12, 2011
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Gallatin Valley, MT
Books? You guys are dating yourselves. Growing up in a canoe and wanting to be a "forest ranger", early /mid 70's reading for me.....
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And a fascination with the Rockies and the old fur trade
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Bambistew

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Dec 10, 2002
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Chugiak, AK
As a kid I read these few times...

Fundamentals of Bowhunting, Dwight Schuh
Bugling for Elk, Dwight Schuh
Journal of a Mountain Man, James Clyman
Undaunted Courage, Stephen Ambrose
Death in the Long Grass, Peter Capstick
 

BigHornRam

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Nov 15, 2004
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6,526
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"Land of Giant Rams"
I read "The Big Sky" many times over growing up. Dad had this one laying around the house that sparked some interest.

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And when I became more focused, I bought this book.

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CampRipleyLF

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Nov 20, 2013
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Minnesota
onpoint and I have the same taste in books.... all on my top 10. Love Sigurd Olson's work. I'd swear you have some Midwest ties
 

Aussie_hunter_JD

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Australia
Try jim Corbett he was my childhood hero along with Roosevelt and remains today. One of the great hunting conservationists and a great writer. He lived in India during the British Raj and aside from being an incredible naturalist he solo hunted man eating leopards and tigers on foot.

Man eating leopard of Rudrapryag and Maneaters of kumaon are classics but i thoroughly recommend Jungle Lore too if you can find it. Took me 10 years to find a 1st edition of that, ended up finding one of the other side of the world never letting it go now! I've also got the fortunate tiger which is good and just got My India.

Another great hunting book is No more the tusker by George Rushby. Ivory hunter, poacher, game warden in Africa. Also talks about his hunt for the njombe maneating lions. A pride that killed over 1,500 people during a 10 year stretch. Never gained the fame of the tsavo lions.

Or for an aussie classic (with one of the best book names around, Hell West and Crooked by Tom Cole. Was a drover, crocodile and buffalo hunter. He's a real life less bs version of what crocodile dundee was hoping to be.
 

Nameless Range

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Jun 6, 2013
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Western Montana
Young Men and Fire is the greatest nonfiction book ever written in my opinion.

Lochsa Story by Bud Moore, 40 Years a Forester by Elers Koch, and Montana Adventure by Frank Bird Linderman are all books I pretty much read on an annual basis.

I’ve not read the 2 in the OP but am interested.
 

Gary

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Jul 4, 2009
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"Dangerous River" by George Patterson - exploring and trapping the NW Territories after WWI.
Aussie JD is on target with Corbett - one of the BEST wildlife writers ever.
Jack O'Conner was always a good read. The same can be said for anything by Russel Annabel. As a kid, I also read lots of books by Farley Mowat - good adventure stories for teenage readers set in the far north.
 

Europe

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Dec 26, 2018
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454
Try jim Corbett he was my childhood hero along with Roosevelt and remains today. One of the great hunting conservationists and a great writer. He lived in India during the British Raj and aside from being an incredible naturalist he solo hunted man eating leopards and tigers on foot.

Man eating leopard of Rudrapryag and Maneaters of kumaon are classics but i thoroughly recommend Jungle Lore too if you can find it. Took me 10 years to find a 1st edition of that, ended up finding one of the other side of the world never letting it go now! I've also got the fortunate tiger which is good and just got My India.

OMG---I have crossed paths with very few people that have even heard of Corbett or his writings. I agree with you and loved his books and thanks to my father I was able to read them at a very young age. Enjoyed many Africa books--Hemingway, Bell, Ruark , Roosevelt,, Capstick, etc--but a book that was written from letters to his wife about hunting Alaska in the 1940's to 1980's was also a good read. " Trail of the Eagle" Not to be confused with the WWII book of the same name. My daughter read The Wahoo Bobcat by Lippincot, at least ten times, and even use dit for book reports when she was young (-;
 

coleslaw

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Jun 13, 2018
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Wisconsin
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I think these are somewhere in my dad's basement still. Found them when I was about 9 or 10 and I probably looked through them every week until I was about 15 or 16 and had a car to take me hunting whenever. I need to go and dig these back up and make them into coffee table books.
 

FAIR CHASE

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Jul 13, 2010
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Montana
'Where the Red Fern Grows"

First great book I read at about 10-12 yo and I can clearly recall the effect that story had on me and crying my eyes out.
Gave that same book (my Mom gave it to me) to my son when he was 10 yo. And yep, made him cry as well.
 

blueridge

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Jan 10, 2019
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Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
'Where the Red Fern Grows"

First great book I read at about 10-12 yo and I can clearly recall the effect that story had on me and crying my eyes out.
Gave that same book (my Mom gave it to me) to my son when he was 10 yo. And yep, made him cry as well.
Me too. Bawled like a baby.

In addition, for me it was "My Side of the Mountain", and the Sackett series of Louis L'amour books, especially "To the Far Blue Mountains".
 

Boomerusaf

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Jul 14, 2018
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Driftless Region
Two of my go-tos are Night of the Grizzlies
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and Robert's Ridge
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they both are nonfiction based on stories of survival. They are pretty good reads.
 
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