The Good 'Ol Days

BrentD

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In the middle
Paul Harvey never lived on a gravel road, much less a dirt road and he would never know the difference. Maudlin phony as any that ever lived.
 

dirtclod Az.

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Jan 24, 2018
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1,773
What’s mainly wrong with society today is that too many Dirt Roads have been paved.


There’s not a problem in America today - crime, drugs, education, divorce, delinquency - that wouldn’t be remedied, if we just had more Dirt Roads, because Dirt Roads give character.


People that live at the end of Dirt Roads learn early on that life is a bumpy ride.


That it can jar you right down to your teeth sometimes, but it’s worth it, if at the end is home…a loving spouse, happy kids and a dog.


autumn-dirt-road1.jpg?resize=300%2C222&s We wouldn’t have near the trouble with our educational system if our kids got their exercise walking a Dirt Road with other kids, from whom they learn how to get along.


There was less crime in our streets before they were paved.


Criminals didn’t walk two dusty miles to rob or rape, if they knew they’d be welcomed by 5 barking dogs and a double barrel shotgun.


And there were no drive by shootings.


Our values were better when our roads were worse!


People did not worship their cars more than their kids, and motorists were more courteous, they didn’t tailgate by riding the bumper or the guy in front would choke you with dust & bust your windshield with rocks.


Dirt Roads taught patience.


Dirt Roads were environmentally friendly, you didn’t hop in your car for a quart of milk you walked to the barn for your milk.


For your mail, you walked to the mail box.


What if it rained and the Dirt Road got washed out? That was the best part, then you stayed home and had some family time, roasted marshmallows and popped popcorn and pony rode on Daddy’s shoulders and learned how to make prettier quilts than anybody.


At the end of Dirt Roads, you soon learned that bad words tasted like soap.


Most paved roads lead to trouble, Dirt Roads more likely lead to a fishing creek or a swimming hole.


At the end of a Dirt Road, the only time we even locked our car was in August, because if we didn’t some neighbor would fill it with too much zucchini.


At the end of a Dirt Road, there was always extra springtime income, from when city dudes would get stuck, you’d have to hitch up a team and pull them out.


Usually you got a dollar…always you got a new friend…at the end of a Dirt Road!


~by Paul Harvey~
God made dirt,Dirt don't hurt. 🔥
 

BraidenR

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Aug 17, 2018
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51
Location
Utah
These were before my time. However we still go down to the same place each year. It is now a Spike only tag. The man with the larger bull was my grandpa. I never got to hunt with him. The guy with him in the last picture is my father with spike bull.
 

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Carl 9.3x62

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Laramie, Wyoming

Gr8bawana

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Nevada
Here is a few from back in mostly the 90's. Took crappy pictures and wore a lot of cotton! Still survived.
It's amazing how deer and elk have evolved. Now days it's not possible to kill anything without wearing $1,000 worth of boots and camo made of the latest high-tech material. ;)
 

FAIR CHASE

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Montana
It's amazing how deer and elk have evolved. Now days it's not possible to kill anything without wearing $1,000 worth of boots and camo made of the latest high-tech material. ;)
Kinda like our other advancements such as electricity and indoor plumbing.
 

geetar

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Jan 28, 2019
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the land of Andy Griffith and Robert Ruark.
Keep this thread going guys! I understand the current trend towards cleaner less bloody photos and taking them in field instead of truck beds or camps but I gotta say I always enjoy the old photos back before folks had to apologize to society that something had blood leaking out of it after they poked a hole in it. The whole world has become detached from reality.
 

antlerradar

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SE Montana
I have posted this buck pic on a different thread more than a few years back. Worth putting up again. One of the biggest deer to ever come out of SE Montana. 200 inch typical frame and 192 6/8 net. Taken by a guy from Harrisburg PA in 1961. I would love to know what has happened to this buck. I found his sheds in 88 and 91. I also found the matches to the sheds in 88 and 81 but there wasn't much left of them.hollinger buck.jpegHollinger Sheds.jpg
 

Carl 9.3x62

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Jul 4, 2016
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388
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Laramie, Wyoming
I have posted this buck pic on a different thread more than a few years back. Worth putting up again. One of the biggest deer to ever come out of SE Montana. 200 inch typical frame and 192 6/8 net. Taken by a guy from Harrisburg PA in 1961. I would love to know what has happened to this buck. I found his sheds in 88 and 91. I also found the matches to the sheds in 88 and 81 but there wasn't much left of them.View attachment 120903View attachment 120904
How was it shed hunting back in the day before it became so popular? Man I wish I could go back in time.
 

antlerradar

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Oct 23, 2012
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SE Montana
How was it shed hunting back in the day before it became so popular? Man I wish I could go back in time.
It was something else. Most people looked at you as if you were from Mars if you mentioned spending the day shed hunting. I commonly found 50+ antlers a day and would leave everything but the big ones.

One time in the 80's I was shed hunting in the Arkansas River Canyon just out of Salida CO. I was parked near the river and was hiking the very steep canyon walls on the other side of the highway. I hadn't found any thing big so I was coming out of the hills empty handed. When I got back to with in sight of the truck I could see a warden parked next to me. He was looking my truck over, especially my Montana plates. When I got down to the truck he ask if I was fishing. No I replied, I was in the hills looking for shed antlers. The warden wasn't buying my story one bit. Asked for my fishing licence. Of course I didn't have one. Asked if I had a fishing pole hid in the bushes. No I replied. I had the hardest time trying convincing him that I was not interested in fishing. Not sure I ever did. He finally let me go, But I wonder how long he looked for the non existing fishing pole I had hid in the bushes. Those were the good old days of shed hunting. I wish I packed a camera back then.
 
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