Sleeping Bag for hot tent question

matechakeric

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If one is hot tenting in late October/November out west, what sleeping bag rating is best?

I have heard that the best rule of thumb is to get a sleeping system rated for 20 degrees colder than the anticipated nighttime lows. That said, if you are going to be in a hot, wouldn't a 0 degree sleeping bag be way overkill?

or is it better safe than sorry just in case sh*t hits the fan and the stove doesn't purr out that nice warmth to have a great bag just in case?
 

matechakeric

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Hot tents aren't generally running the stove all night. Same bag as regular tent.
good call. thanks for your help. i guess if you keep some large rocks nearby the stove, they may help retain some of the warmth through the night in the tent once the fire goes out
 

The_Jim

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When I hot tent I usually put the fire out before I go to sleep. Otherwise you’ll fall asleep with your bag partially open and wake up cold.

I use a 20 degree bag and use my puffy layers inside and a sea to summit reactor liner to get more temperature out of it. Your pad is also going to be a key component in staying warm. The neoair xtherm. It’s worked for me and I’m a guy that is cold all the time.
 

matechakeric

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When I hot tent I usually put the fire out before I go to sleep. Otherwise you’ll fall asleep with your bag partially open and wake up cold.

I use a 20 degree bag and use my puffy layers inside and a sea to summit reactor liner to get more temperature out of it. Your pad is also going to be a key component in staying warm. The neoair xtherm. It’s worked for me and I’m a guy that is cold all the time.
is it worth even having a hot tent if backpack hunting for only a couple hours max per day of stove use?
 

Redman

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is it worth even having a hot tent if backpack hunting for only a couple hours max per day of stove use?
Yes! A warm tent even for a little bit does something to rejuvenate you. Have you ever put on frozen boots in the morning?
 

matechakeric

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It will dry your clothes and boots plus warm you. Why be cold and miserable when you don't have to?
simply because we will be backpack hunting and hauling around a stove/pipe could be cumbersome on top of the rest of the gear. you do make a good point though
 

Beignet

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is it worth even having a hot tent if backpack hunting for only a couple hours max per day of stove use?
I’m in the minority amongst some of my hunting buddies in that I don’t love them. Usually hunting from first to last light, then I make a mountain house meal and hit the sack. I’ll sleep either in the canopied bed of my truck, or in a light but durable three season tent if I’m backpack hunting. Hot tents take a bit of effort to put up and take down, gotta cut a bunch of firewood, and then you’re cold again by the time you wake up.

However, my opinion can be changed about sleeping in one, usually around late November if/when things get especially cold.
 

kwyeewyk

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is it worth even having a hot tent if backpack hunting for only a couple hours max per day of stove use?
Really depends on how cold/wet the weather ends up being, if you're above 20 at night, no precip, I'd probably skip, if it's single digits or under, windy, or wet forecast it is nice to have the option. If you're moving camp each day/carrying all your stuff around I'd need a little more motivation to want to mess with it, more of a spike camp option than bivy style, although some people do haul them around.
 

The_Jim

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is it worth even having a hot tent if backpack hunting for only a couple hours max per day of stove use?
In September maybe not so much. You spend so many hours awake hunting that your need sleep more than a fire.

Late season is a deferent story though. Cold and wet weather are the obvious reasons but you also tend to spend a lot more time in the tent in those later hunts within so much less daylight.

Most nights it’s not necessary, but you’ll eventually end up getting wet and cold and be REALLY glad you brought it.
 

nrpate05

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I'd bring two so when you melt one on the stove you have a backup...And the stoves are good for getting you to bed but they go out fairly quickly and it'll get cold inside.
 

SFC B

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ALWAYS have a bag combo rated to the coldest temperature possible that time of year. You can always vent open a bag but being light on insulation plain sucks. Even where I live in the Springs I have experienced 50f to -20f in a 24 hour period......I sleep in a wall tent with a stove and bring my -30 rated bag every hunt.
 

BearFoot

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Our bags are rated for comfort with out stove. The stove is sweet, icing on the hot cake. It is easier to cool off in fall season. Stoves help keep things dry.
 

Redman

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simply because we will be backpack hunting and hauling around a stove/pipe could be cumbersome on top of the rest of the gear. you do make a good point though
The Seek Outside stove pipe rolls down small as a Nalgene bottle and depending on size of the stove you get it I about the size of a foam seat pad.
 

pre6422hornet

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simply because we will be backpack hunting and hauling around a stove/pipe could be cumbersome on top of the rest of the gear. you do make a good point though
I run a Lite Outdoors stove. The stove pipe rolls up to the size of a pop can. Hot tent and stove for me weighs less than a 3 person tent. And it has more room. My partner and I ran his 3 person REI tent and it was lets just say pretty snug for the two of us. My setup is almost 10"x10", uses a trekking pole for middle support and there is more than enough room for each of us on each side of the stove.

Going to sleep in a warm tent and then waking up, getting the tent hot and getting dressed in warmth does wonders for you.
 

Ghillieman

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If one is hot tenting in late October/November out west, what sleeping bag rating is best?

I have heard that the best rule of thumb is to get a sleeping system rated for 20 degrees colder than the anticipated nighttime lows. That said, if you are going to be in a hot, wouldn't a 0 degree sleeping bag be way overkill?

or is it better safe than sorry just in case sh*t hits the fan and the stove doesn't purr out that nice warmth to have a great bag just in case?
Heres my thoughts on this subject 15 degree bag. Too hot open er up. Bring a bivi bag. Adds warmth keeps a down bag dry and clean. If ya want to err on the side of caution..bring a merino bag liner..more warmth also keeps your bag clean between the 3 your in good shape pretty much with or without a stove and yer down bag stays dry. My 2 cents
 

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