Rifle for Alaska

Cogreeny

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Sep 23, 2016
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Lyons, CO
My only qualm about the SPS is the trigger... it’s just terrible IMHO.
It is a crap trigger all remingtons I buy get that xmark crap jerked out and replaced with some flavor of aftermarket trigger. Except the 700 police ltr’s I have they have the 40x triggers much like the old style walker triggers I like them.
 

Brian in Montana

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Jan 20, 2017
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Ramsay, MT
My only qualm about the SPS is the trigger... it’s just terrible IMHO.
I've had a number of Remingtons and can't think of one I didn't like, but about the x-mark pro or whatever they're calling it, I agree. I took mine apart on my 7-08 and made some adjustments, but what I did voided the warranty. Its not that bad now, its set just under 3lbs, breaks more or less consistent, but at some point I do I tend to replace it.
 

Randi

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Aug 4, 2019
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Anschutz

I dont believe Bamabistew is back from his hunt yet. you might pm him as he has been hunting Alaska longer than I

Every so often, on an Alaska forum or in/on a different venue we are asked for our opinion of the do everything Alaska caliber.

And every time it comes back close to the following

Excluding a dedicated coastal brown bear hunt ( and many say this when they cast their opinion )

300wm almost always ends up on top with 25/30 percent
338 is always a close second
30-06 is always a close third

these three almost always makes up the top 80%, the only other one that gets over 10% of the vote is the 375 H & H. The other 10% is all over the map. The 45/70 usually gets a good percentage of the votes for a Dedicated Coastal Brown Bear hunt.
 

wllm1313

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Aurora, CO
Anschutz

I dont believe Bamabistew is back from his hunt yet. you might pm him as he has been hunting Alaska longer than I

Every so often, on an Alaska forum or in/on a different venue we are asked for our opinion of the do everything Alaska caliber.

And every time it comes back close to the following

Excluding a dedicated coastal brown bear hunt ( and many say this when they cast their opinion )

300wm almost always ends up on top with 25/30 percent
338 is always a close second
30-06 is always a close third

these three almost always makes up the top 80%, the only other one that gets over 10% of the vote is the 375 H & H. The other 10% is all over the map. The 45/70 usually gets a good percentage of the votes for a Dedicated Coastal Brown Bear hunt.
Exactly.

Within those three your selection then becomes a factor of recoil tolerance and/or desired rifle weight.
 

Mtnhuntr

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Sep 26, 2017
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775
Anschutz

I dont believe Bamabistew is back from his hunt yet. you might pm him as he has been hunting Alaska longer than I

Every so often, on an Alaska forum or in/on a different venue we are asked for our opinion of the do everything Alaska caliber.

And every time it comes back close to the following

Excluding a dedicated coastal brown bear hunt ( and many say this when they cast their opinion )

300wm almost always ends up on top with 25/30 percent
338 is always a close second
30-06 is always a close third

these three almost always makes up the top 80%, the only other one that gets over 10% of the vote is the 375 H & H. The other 10% is all over the map. The 45/70 usually gets a good percentage of the votes for a Dedicated Coastal Brown Bear hunt.
wisdom there. The following article is geared towards bear rifles but if you wanted a do-it-all gun these might be worth considering:

 

VikingsGuy

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Aug 2, 2017
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Twin Cities
wisdom there. The following article is geared towards bear rifles but if you wanted a do-it-all gun these might be worth considering:

A wonderful quote from this article that could be used in so many cartridge discussions on HT:

"You’re probably a lot better off with an ’06 that doesn’t cause you to wet yourself than with a .495 Thunderf**ker that does."
 

memtb

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Dec 25, 2000
Messages
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Winchester,Wy, USA
wisdom there. The following article is geared towards bear rifles but if you wanted a do-it-all gun these might be worth considering:


Mtnhunter, We all know that there is “nearly zero” chances of encountering an aggressive bear when deer hunting in Alaska!:unsure: So, being prepared for something that absolutely “will not” happen, is paranoia. Compound that with, a deer shot with a decent bear stopping cartridge, will be totally destroyed and no meat salvageable! ;) memtb
 

BuzzH

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Jan 9, 2001
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Laramie, WY
I would hunt Alaska the rest of my life with a 7-08 and never bat an eye...including grizzly and brown bear.

Shot placement and good bullets...cover lots of bases.
 

Mtnhuntr

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Sep 26, 2017
Messages
775
A wonderful quote from this article that could be used in so many cartridge discussions on HT:

"You’re probably a lot better off with an ’06 that doesn’t cause you to wet yourself than with a .495 Thunderf**ker that does."
Bingo. I personally carry a 9mm for self defense cause I know I can be accurate with it.
 

Mtnhuntr

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Mtnhunter, We all know that there is “nearly zero” chances of encountering an aggressive bear when deer hunting in Alaska!:unsure: So, being prepared for something that absolutely “will not” happen, is paranoia. Compound that with, a deer shot with a decent bear stopping cartridge, will be totally destroyed and no meat salvageable! ;) memtb
well, not the point of the article but yeah, nobody disagrees with that.
 

Panda Bear

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Apr 23, 2019
Messages
153
Anschutz

I dont believe Bamabistew is back from his hunt yet. you might pm him as he has been hunting Alaska longer than I

Every so often, on an Alaska forum or in/on a different venue we are asked for our opinion of the do everything Alaska caliber.

And every time it comes back close to the following

Excluding a dedicated coastal brown bear hunt ( and many say this when they cast their opinion )

300wm almost always ends up on top with 25/30 percent
338 is always a close second
30-06 is always a close third

these three almost always makes up the top 80%, the only other one that gets over 10% of the vote is the 375 H & H. The other 10% is all over the map. The 45/70 usually gets a good percentage of the votes for a Dedicated Coastal Brown Bear hunt.
This makes sense.

I am not in Alaska but we have the same animals. I personally prefer the 348 and 275 H & H, however my first rifle was a 30-06 and it hunted everything for several years.

Anyway you ask about the the 300 , 338, 9.3 x 62 and 375 and the short answer would be any of them will work for you in Alaska. The long answer is the 300 with a 180 gr Partition or A Frame is probably your best one rifle choice. It will reach out a bit further and hit hard when it gets there and do so with less recoil than the other three. The 300 is perfect in my opinion for Caribou, Deer, Sheep, Goat, Black Bear, Grizzly, Wolf and Elk ( do they have elk in Alaska ? ) With a properly placed shot and a premium bullet you will be fine with Moose, Bison and Muskox ( however if you buy two rifles, any of the other there mentioned would be a better choice in my opinion when hunting those three ) The 300 WM with a premium bullet will also ruin a Brown Bears day, but I would prefer more when crawling through coastal alders in search of one of those big guys. Maybe a 300 WM and a 375 H & H would be a nice combo. I did not mention the walrus or Polar because unless you are an Inuit, you will not be able to hunt them in Alaska.

Good luck on your move, and enjoy your new rifle, . Also I try to go over and volunteer at one of the check points during the Iditarod each year. You might want to watch the "Start" of the race one year after you get up there. Great fun
 

Dave N

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Also I try to go over and volunteer at one of the check points during the Iditarod each year. You might want to watch the "Start" of the race one year after you get up there. Great fun
Yes it is. Went there in 2014. Did the ceremonial start in Anchorage, the restart in Willow, and sat on a lake on the trail watching the mushers go by. Awesome! Our cabin is right down the road from Linwood Fiedler's place. We can hear his dogs at feeding time!
 

Panda Bear

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Good for you Dave. It is a lot of fun. If the opportunity presents itself try to go up to Nome for the finish . They party hearty !!! Lot of fun.

Anschultz---apologizes a bit off track. BUT, when you get up there----------- Anchorage, Willow, Nome--try to make one or all three, you will enjoy it
 

Carl 9.3x62

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Laramie, Wyoming
Of course I will recommend the 9.3x62, haha. But I have never been to Alaska so don't put too much stock in my answer. It kills elk plenty easy if your bullet is in the right spot, just like any other caliber. Ammo is impossible to find in stores, but easy enough to order online. Recoil isn't actually too bad, and I am someone who is recoil shy. I would definitely get a rifle in stainless steel though.
 

Bambistew

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Dec 10, 2002
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Chugiak, AK
These type of threads are always funny... There is really no right or wrong answer, its all personal preference, and each hunt can dictate what the best option could be after all the mental gymnastics.

Why have only one rifle? Insanity...

Get one that's light, shoots well, SS, and has a short-ish barrel. Long barrels on rifles suck in the bush.
 

wllm1313

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Dec 9, 2015
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Aurora, CO
These type of threads are always funny... There is really no right or wrong answer, its all personal preference, and each hunt can dictate what the best option could be after all the mental gymnastics.

Why have only one rifle? Insanity...

Get one that's light, shoots well, SS, and has a short-ish barrel. Long barrels on rifles suck in the bush.
The amount of thinking guys do about rifles and calibers in comparison towards how important they are in determining a hunts success is kinda hilarious.

As someone who started from scratch and therefore recently got slapped in the face with the massive learning curve I would put your brain power towards the following.

1.What do I do after I've killed a huge critter, especially if I'm solo
2. How does that meat get home
3. Boots
4. Rain gear/pack/tent
5. Optics
 

Panda Bear

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Apr 23, 2019
Messages
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These type of threads are always funny... There is really no right or wrong answer, its all personal preference, and each hunt can dictate what the best option could be after all the mental gymnastics.

Why have only one rifle? Insanity...

Get one that's light, shoots well, SS, and has a short-ish barrel. Long barrels on rifles suck in the bush.

I was asked to reply to this thread and since I was asked I tried to do so in as through manner as possible out of respect for the person who ask me and to the gentleman who originally asked the question.

However as one who hunts with two calibers no one else uses, I do agree with the post above by Bambistew. And if we are talking rifles and not calibers, as I thought when I read the op's question--Bambistew is again correct--short barrel, SS, light,

Bambistews point about more than one rifle is also a good point----. Unless you can only afford one rifle, then the caliber and choice thereof could be important. And if you have never hunted Alaska, then some guidance toward which two rifles/calibers you should buy, might be helpful.

As I understand it your thinking of buying a rifle to use in Alaska. A rifle you do not now own and was curious as to what caliber would let you hunt Caribou and Moose specifically. And I would still say, from the list of calibers you ask us to choice from, my first choice in that case would be a 300 WM and for the reasons I stated in my first post. Two rifles would see me buying a 300WM and a 375 H & H ( from your list ) Yes, you have a 45/70 which will certainly work when fishing ( for protection ) or even when hunting the Browns along the coast. But if your buying two new rifles to hunt Alaska, those two would serve you well sir. One last point. The 9.3 x 62 is a nice caliber but ammo is not found everywhere. And in closing the 338 is also nice caliber, although we do not have one my husband does have a 340 Weatherby , and if recoil doesn't bother you, it will knock down anything out there and at long distances.
 
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