lead sled or sandbags?

GlockZ

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just looking for opinions here. do you prefer using sandbags or a lead sled to zero your rifle(s)? i have used both, but prefer using the sandbag method. only because i've never seen anyone drag out a lead sled when hunting, and because when using a lead sled your not actually holding the rifle like the way one would when hunting in the field. so what is everyones opinion ? is there any advantages to using a lead sled, other than sucking up a lot of the recoil?
 

hank4elk

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Not that I spend a whole lot of time at the range,but I have been using Stoney Point Bags for 18 yrs.
 

HiMtnHntr

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As noted above, the sled is good for grouping different loads, especially in rifle/calibers that produce significant recoil. It's nice to verify right out of the gate what a particular combo is capable of. Beyond that, there's not a lot of utility for practical shooting purposes.
 

Brian in Montana

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Exactly what Mike said. I find bags more stable but somehow a little more trouble. My sandbags are the pant legs of old jeans filled with sand and sown or stapled shut. They actually work great, but sand is heavy. For testing out different loads I use a lead sled a led sled. I also take a tie down and use it to attach the front end of the sled to the shooting bench. That doesn't work on all shooting benches, but it does stable the sled, and by extension the rifle, quite well. If I'm just shooting, I prefer sandbags or a bipod, or sometimes my hunting pack stuffed with clothes. That's what I generally shoot off of in the field, a pack of a bipod.
 
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sbhooper

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I like the sled for grouping different loads.Takes my poor shooting skills out of the equation.
This. There is a bit of a learning curve, though, as you don't want to hold your rifle any differently than you would on bags. I like bags, too, but it is sure nice to be able to shoot magnums as many times as you want without getting pounded. I will always have a lead sled.
 

farbedo

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Lead sled or equivalent is my go to. I rarely take less than 3 rifles and at least one is usually a hard kicker. Sand bags work fine as well, but 60-70 rounds of .300 Win and .340 Weatherby into a range day wears me out without a sled. None of my rifles wear a brake.

Jeremy
 

mtmuley

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Can't stand the things. I tried one, shoot better without it. Not really interested in containing all the recoil within my rifles either. mtmuley
 

stillkickin

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Can't stand the things. I tried one, shoot better without it. Not really interested in containing all the recoil within my rifles either. mtmuley
My opinion also! But do recognize the multiple effect of heavy recoil on the odd chance you need to shoot a lot of rounds. I try to avoid that and practice with a similar rifle with a lighter recoiling round
 

sbhooper

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Can't stand the things. I tried one, shoot better without it. Not really interested in containing all the recoil within my rifles either. mtmuley
The recoil is not contained within the rifle, unless you bolt the rest to the bench. I have to reset the rest every time I shoot a hard-kicker. It just takes the punishment off your shoulder. I have shot thousands of rounds over mine (only ever had one) and I have had no indications that the rifles are any worse for wear.
 

mtmuley

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I'm not taking any chances. Already had a RUM crack a stock without being strapped in one of those things. No thanks. mtmuley
 

AlaskaHunter

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The recoil is not contained within the rifle, unless you bolt the rest to the bench. I have to reset the rest every time I shoot a hard-kicker. It just takes the punishment off your shoulder. I have shot thousands of rounds over mine (only ever had one) and I have had no indications that the rifles are any worse for wear.
I've never had a problem either in 25 years of shooting.
I shoot a .270 and .300 H &H, usually use the lead sled when working up a load.

Once I'm sighted in, I shoot at balloons using the same setup and field conditions I will use hunting.

--Skeeter
 

WapitiBob

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You can use a sled but I would suggest not adding any weight to it. Just use it as a two point rest on the bench. If your rifle doesn't have a bipod, I'd be using whatever I had planned for the hunt, pack, coat, etc. With a Bipod, I'd be using that and the rear bag/support I planned to hunt with.
 

noharleyyet

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I'm not taking any chances. Already had a RUM crack a stock without being strapped in one of those things. No thanks. mtmuley
I hear ya on static arrest but mitigating punishment and movement with an unweighted two point restraint platform helps me ascertain a truer accuracy diagnosis. Taking the mechanical subconscious nabob out of the equation, so to speak. My cheap lil' leadless rig is about like a muzzle break...guessing.
 

mtmuley

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I hear ya on static arrest but mitigating punishment and movement with an unweighted two point restraint platform helps me ascertain a truer accuracy diagnosis. Taking the mechanical subconscious nabob out of the equation, so to speak. My cheap lil' leadless rig is about like a muzzle break...guessing.
Itty bitty groups without help make me grin. mtmuley
 

406LIFE

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I use a lead sled at the range. My primary goal is to dial in my rifle as accurately as possible, and the sled takes as much of the human variable out of the equation as possible. If you have a flinch, it can help mitigate that.
 
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