Insulation discussion

Irrelevant

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I'm getting old, so bear with me, because I've probably already shared an article on this stuff.
But I'm always cold, and always looking for better ways to stay warm, and while there is a contingent of people on here who process their love for wool, I like to be actually warm, not just miserably wet but alive.
 
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Saw a random youtube about that stuff the other day, and the guy put it head to head against down. With the same weight of insulation the down beat aerogel by quite a bit in freezer tests. Im guessing NASA would be laughed at if they stuffed "bird feathers" around their rockets to send into space.
 
Saw a random youtube about that stuff the other day, and the guy put it head to head against down. With the same weight of insulation the down beat aerogel by quite a bit in freezer tests. Im guessing NASA would be laughed at if they stuffed "bird feathers" around their rockets to send into space.
you should share it
 
I'm getting old, so bear with me, because I've probably already shared an article on this stuff.
But I'm always cold, and always looking for better ways to stay warm, and while there is a contingent of people on here who process their love for wool, I like to be actually warm, not just miserably wet but alive.
Im always cold.

Best thing for me has been a goretex outer layer (with vents), puffy vest/jacket, and a merino/base of some kind.

If im walking i either take the the puffy off (or unzip vest) and vent. If im sitting i seal it all up.

The non-windstopping "soft shells" leave a lot to be desired (hot when walking, cold when sitting) and are to 40 + degree days for me.
 
7 minutes of my life I won’t get back but the video was interesting.

Short story: if you are cold, you are cold, lol. That, and please cut NASA’s budget unless it relates to Tang 🤣
 
We just had a insulation blown in about a ft thick and its working great so far. Hopefully we will get our 3 infrared tube heaters up soon then ill take pictures.
 
I have a pair of ski gloves with the aerogel insulation. They are certainly the warmest gloves I have worn and they are still somewhat dextrous.
 
Living in interior Alaska for over 30 years, I found I got used to the cold.
I noticed the first day in camp I felt cold, but by the 14th day the same conditions were comfortable.
Back home, in the winter a week of cold snap at -40 in the winter, and then -20 felt warm!
 
One thing I am sure of is that synthetic lose considerable loft and have no where near the life of down. That said I find they level out. So a jacket that’ was originally comfortable say at 30 will loose some of it’s insulation ability and the level off.
 
One thing I am sure of is that synthetic lose considerable loft and have no where near the life of down. That said I find they level out. So a jacket that’ was originally comfortable say at 30 will loose some of it’s insulation ability and the level off.
I have an OR Refuge for everyday puffy use. When I got it (6 yrs ago), it was good for anything above ~10F, now it's not even good for 30F. There is almost no fluff. Yet, I have a slightly older Millet with PrimaLoft Gold (not the one referenced in the OP), and that has maintained it's wonderfulness for the last 10 years still with great loft. Point is, not all synthetics are the same, and you (may) get what you pay for.
 
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One thing I am sure of is that synthetic lose considerable loft and have no where near the life of down. That said I find they level out. So a jacket that’ was originally comfortable say at 30 will loose some of it’s insulation ability and the level off.
I have found this is generally true as well. Arcteryx has a version of their proprietary synthetic insulation that they pre-compact such that it doesn’t change (much). It’s obviously less lofty for the weight than an initially puffy synthetic, but more consistent.

As in nearly all outdoor gear there is no free lunch IME, and I’d wager that holds for aerogel tech as well.
 
I've had a pair of the OR Aerogel gloves since they came out in 2019, I still use them all the time, still really warm, good insulation for climbing gloves for sure, they allow some amount of dexterity but don't seem to pack out like a lot of synthetics, they do seem to trap a fair bit of moisture and get clammy though...I could see it being a less ideal insulation for sweaty areas...
 
I have found this is generally true as well. Arcteryx has a version of their proprietary synthetic insulation that they pre-compact such that it doesn’t change (much). It’s obviously less lofty for the weight than an initially puffy synthetic, but more consistent.

As in nearly all outdoor gear there is no free lunch IME, and I’d wager that holds for aerogel tech as well.



Where this has really hurt me was bags and quilts….so much so that I am considering foregoing replacing my synthetics. While I limit them to places like Alaska, BC and one or two places in the lower 48…. I am freaking not trilled about a 20 degree 400 dollar quilt that’s two years later is a heavy 40 degree quilt. Lesson learned
 
Also just a reminder that now is a good time to pick up some pretty nice puffies for 40-50% off.
 
Here is a specific question. I have a Sitka Kelvin vest. Love it. Just love it. They dont make them anymore and I was thinking about getting my teenage boys something. Sitka now makes the Aerolite vest. Any thoughts on if it as warm as the Kelvin? It is way, WAY thinner.
 
I wear long John's. Artic shield bibs. A milwaukee m12 hoodie. Then an artic shield parka. If I start to get cold at all I just unzip my parka a little, turn the hoodie on and enjoy being warm warm warm. Not very bulky either.
 
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