Idaho $1mil elk damage paid to farmer.

375H&H

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Why? The Wyoming already pays the landowner via the landowner coupon attached to your license. Most landowners who do charge a trespass fee charge a ridiculously high one. And if it's to access public lands they are blocking access too, they should not get a dime either way.
You really think a $16 coupon covers the feed an elk eats out of a field?
 

WyoDoug

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You really think a $16 coupon covers the feed an elk eats out of a field?
I don't know about other states, but Wyoming also pays depredation damages. Key should be if it is not (I have not checked on conditions of that) that landowners should allow hunters on their property and that should be free of any trespass type fee.
 

magnum44270

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I don't know about other states, but Wyoming also pays depredation damages. Key should be if it is not (I have not checked on conditions of that) that landowners should allow hunters on their property and that should be free of any trespass type fee.

Exactly.......if elk/deer are the problem and you want to claim crop damage in the end; run your paid hunters, but also allow a minimum number of non fee hunters to control the numbers...
 

Losing_Sanity

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I don't know about other states, but Wyoming also pays depredation damages. Key should be if it is not (I have not checked on conditions of that) that landowners should allow hunters on their property and that should be free of any trespass type fee.
In a perfect world...

In the defense of some land owners, many have dealt with as much or more damage from unethical people. Others are just making more profit. I don't like to see more fees attached to an already expensive activity. God knows I can't afford to pay someone to access their land. That said, I can understand some of their reasoning. Even if we don't like it, making more profit is their right. Another thought could be; pay to hunt or pay at the grocery store. They will need to recoup losses some how.
I also don't see increasing the allotted kill ratio increased in certain areas to accommodate a farmers losses. That is not managing wildlife. Farmers and Ranchers ought to accept some responsibility for wildlife and natural influences to the cost of doing business. But again, we will pay one way or another.
 

WyoDoug

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I have walked in the landowner shoes having grown up on a farm. I understand not letting them hunt on their land due to damage or leaving gates open, but I have no sympathy personally for not letting people gain access to public land. But to stick with the topic of depradation reimbursements the two conditions on getting it should be (1) You allow hunters to hunt your property (you can restrict which ones can't) and (2) you allow hunters access to public lands that are landlocked by your deeded property. Again, if you have problems with certain hunters, call it in to the G&F or the sheriff.
 

HowaHunter

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E. Idaho
Here is what Idaho requires to file a claim: access to or through the property by hunters unless it impedes business operations. That sure should be beefed up.

q  Claimant notifies IDFG within 72 hours of discovering crop damage caused by deer, elk, pronghorn or moose.
q  Claimant notifies Wildlife Services upon discovering livestock losses by bear or lion (on private or public land) and berry losses and losses to bees, beehives, or honey (on private land only) caused by a bear.
q  Claimant provides written notice, which may be electronic, to IDFG within 10 days.
q  Owner or lessee must have allowed hunters reasonable access to the property or through the property to public lands for hunting purposes during the preceding hunting season or as a measure of response to depredation, provided such access did not negatively impact their operations.
q  Damage to fences, irrigation equipment, and other property is not eligible for compensation.
q  Claim must be in writing on a form provided by IDFG.
q  Claimant must allow on-site access for inspection/investigation of damages prior to harvest.
q  Claimant has taken all reasonable steps to prevent/minimize property loss/damage by wildlife
 

hossblur

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I only play a botanist on TV. But organic produce carries with it a huge loss potential because pesticides can't be used. If I'm sitting in a drought zone, or get hit with pests, I'm claiming loss as well. In fact I'm seeking out the most ancient grain I can find, and claiming loss, easy money.

BTW, I spent some of the recession in a food warehouse. Those "organic" veggies, they are shelved next to to GMO and pesticided ones. Often "picked" onto the same pallets. Shipped on the same tainted trucks as well. If you don't grow it at your place, it ain't organic, it just costs more
 

Horse

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Is it safe to assume that crop insurance doesn't cover wildlife damage?

Also, in South Dakota the Deer only really destroy crops in the middle of a bad winter, and more often then not they are getting into the bales the farmer has made for his cattle... How were the elk in such large numbers before he was able to harvest his crop? Or was he behind the ball on getting his crop out of the ground and took advantage of the situation?

I obviously don't have all the dirty details, but it just doesn't seem to add up... But I am also in a state with corn and beans not fancy organic ancient grains and organic potatoes...
Two types of crop insurance. One is hail only . Other covers storm damage or bug/pest damage. Deer or birds are not covered by this. I don’t know details either but maybe elk damaged the plants in the bud stage so they never produced potatoes Just a guess Also he would have had to show a damage value to be awarded this $. Guessing “organic” label helped that. In Wisconsin, if you claim deer damage you havevto open up farm for certain number of hunters per acre and a certain number of years.
Like others have mentioned, elk might just be there at night and gone at sun up. Doesn’t help you all that want access to this private property. Think many can relate to this when you look back at Montana when had the late cow hunts.
 

SD_Prairie_Goat

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Two types of crop insurance. One is hail only . Other covers storm damage or bug/pest damage. Deer or birds are not covered by this. I don’t know details either but maybe elk damaged the plants in the bud stage so they never produced potatoes Just a guess Also he would have had to show a damage value to be awarded this $. Guessing “organic” label helped that. In Wisconsin, if you claim deer damage you havevto open up farm for certain number of hunters per acre and a certain number of years.
Like others have mentioned, elk might just be there at night and gone at sun up. Doesn’t help you all that want access to this private property. Think many can relate to this when you look back at Montana when had the late cow hunts.
So I talked to my Agronomist friend about crop insurance and animal damage, he basically said there is no "animal insurance", but some people do buy guarantied yield insurance which pays out anytime your yield drops below 70% of your proven yield for a field. So in a round about way you can be covered for this issue, but who wants to pay for expensive insurance when you can have fish and game pay you out? Its interesting to say the least
 

WyoDoug

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Two types of crop insurance. One is hail only . Other covers storm damage or bug/pest damage. Deer or birds are not covered by this. I don’t know details either but maybe elk damaged the plants in the bud stage so they never produced potatoes Just a guess Also he would have had to show a damage value to be awarded this $. Guessing “organic” label helped that. In Wisconsin, if you claim deer damage you havevto open up farm for certain number of hunters per acre and a certain number of years.
Like others have mentioned, elk might just be there at night and gone at sun up. Doesn’t help you all that want access to this private property. Think many can relate to this when you look back at Montana when had the late cow hunts.
Crop Insurance also does not cover damage cause by predators, insects, rodents or similar. Not sure why, but it should be available. Right now depredation reimbursements is all that is available that I know about.
 

antelopedundee

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Ames
Crop Insurance also does not cover damage cause by predators, insects, rodents or similar. Not sure why, but it should be available. Right now depredation reimbursements is all that is available that I know about.
And a portion of the app fee goes into that fund.
 

shootbrownelk

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Wyoming
Crop Insurance also does not cover damage cause by predators, insects, rodents or similar. Not sure why, but it should be available. Right now depredation reimbursements is all that is available that I know about.
Jeeez, don't give the Federal Government any ideas there Doug. It'll become another black hole for tax dollars, like the Federal Flood Insurance rip-off.
 

westbranch

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Jeeez, don't give the Federal Government any ideas there Doug. It'll become another black hole for tax dollars, like the Federal Flood Insurance rip-off.
Already happening... Widespread crop issues and things like livestock disease are too wide of risks for private insurers to want to be involved. Private insurers only cover "narrow peril" stuff like hail for crops or more limited stuff for livestock. When the bird flu hit in 2015 any insurance company that would have had to pay out on 45 million turkeys and chickens would have went out of business.

Feds pay 60% of the premiums for multi-peril crop insurance. Farmers still have to pay in 40%, and some may never get a payout on their policy so they never see the money but they are getting the subsidies if they want to be insured.
 
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