How far in do you backpack??

trophy_killer

New member
Joined
Jan 13, 2002
Messages
1,906
Location
Salmon, ID
When you guys backpack hunt how far in do you usually go?? I have heard some guys say 2-3 miles and others say 5-7 miles in is how far you have to go to get away from the hunters. Also, about how long does it take you to hike into your area. Lastly, how heavy are your packs for a week long hunt?? Thanks!!
 

Wyodeerhunter

Banned
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Messages
2,151
I would say about 20....feet that is. Thats how far it is acrossed the hotel room, usually takes about 10 secs, unless feet are muddy and you have to remove your boots. I bring a few coolers, they stay nice and cold in the hotel room, but heres a little backpacking tip for you: Don't leave your beer in your hotel room, the housekeepers will steal it!
 

T Bone

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 8, 2001
Messages
4,771
Location
West Slope, CO
TK,
Most of my backpack hunts for deer and elk are only 1-3 miles. I choose places that are vertical and void of roads, atv or pack trails. That one to 3 miles seem to thin out 99% of other hunters. I do most of my homework on maps, then go in on foot and preseason scout.
 

Jack O'Conner

New member
Joined
Jan 11, 2003
Messages
131
Location
Black Hawk, SD
Rarely more than 7 miles. I use a wheelbarrow with solid tire (no tube to leak)instead of a backpack.

Back in the 1970's I often rented a burro to haul my stuff. Tried lama a couple times but burro is easier to work with.
Jack
 

dgibson

New member
Joined
Aug 22, 2001
Messages
1,671
Location
Henderson, KY
From my experiences pushing a wheelbarrow full of dirt over semi-rough FLAT ground, I can't imagine what 7 miles of mountain terrain would be like.
If you do that, you're one heckuva patient man!
 

Jack O'Conner

New member
Joined
Jan 11, 2003
Messages
131
Location
Black Hawk, SD
I won't bore you with long mathematical explanations. But the diameter of the tire relates to the amount of difficulty going over things like downed limbs. The length of the handles directly relates to the amount of strength required to lift the weight and to direct its path.

The modern wheelbarrow is a combination of the lever and the wheel: two great engineering marvels.

Most of my elk huntin' in the past 10 years has been in the Bear Lodge Mts. of NE Wyoming. Typically, we cross several meadows and follow a certain creek bank to get to our campsite. No cliffs to climb.

Oh, did I mention that our backpacks are lashed to the skeleton frame? We carry our loaded rifles on slings. Sure beats carrying 50 lbs on your back. Another thing-ever try to drag a dead elk? Our device works!
Jack
 

AZ402

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Messages
4,392
Location
Cottonwood,Arizona
I once packed Greenhorn for 7 miles on my back. He had a certain livestock animal on his back, along with 50lbs of water-based lubricant. It was by far the most gratifying hike to date...........
 

Greenhorn

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 19, 2000
Messages
7,082
Stan.. the sheep was actually on your back.. and I was on the sheep. But with all that lube, I can see how you might not be able to tell us apart.
 

AZ402

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Messages
4,392
Location
Cottonwood,Arizona
Wow, thats weird, that sheep was HUGE if you know what I mean


<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ 03-10-2003 21:57: Message edited by: AZ402 ]</font>
 

KC

New member
Joined
Jun 3, 2002
Messages
328
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
TK:

I'm with T-Bone. I only go a few miles but it's through rough country that keeps most others out. When I want to go further, I make arrangements with a local rancher to hawl out my game on horses. In the summer I commonly hike 6 to 8 miles on backpack trips.

I try to keep my pack to less than 35 pounds. Though with food for a week that's hard to do.


Greenhorn:

Anything with a wheel is prohibited in wilderness areas. I guess you probably know that so you must not be hunting in a wilderness area. I wouldn't use a wheelbarrow to hawl out game. Because a wheelbarrow has the wheel forward and therefore you can't centyer the load over the wheels. That being the case, your arms are still holding a lot of weight and after a long time that could be really difficult. I think I would use a two-wheeled cart with the wheels centered under the weight.

KC
 

Moosie

Grand poopa
Joined
Dec 9, 2000
Messages
17,526
Location
Boise, Idaho
KC, it wasn't Greeny that used the Wheelbarrow


For Deer this year we're going to do a 7 mile trip in, I made it last year on a solo trip, maybe you remember the Story without the food and Water
.... Anyways, We're going to do better justice to that trip this year.. I'll let ya know how it goes... Usually it's only a 3 mile trip in (Or so)...
 
Top