Frustrated

morgaj1

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Feb 2, 2020
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259
A buddy and I just got back from a whitetail hunt in Missouri. First, let me say, that I have never seen as many quality deer as I have on this trip. One day, I saw 89 does and 6 bucks, 3 of which were 7 or better. One of the days, I shot about a 160-165" ten point at 180 yards free handed. I hit him behind the shoulder, but a tad high. We waited 90 minutes to track him. About 70 yards from where I shot him, we jumped him up near a pond. He got up slowly and ran off, so we backed out. We came back the next morning and tracked him. About 20 yards from where we last saw him, we tracked him to the property line fence, which was only about 2 feet high. On that fence was hair and flesh, so we know he crossed there. To make a long story short, the neighboring farmer would not let us track the deer on his property, so we never recovered him. To know that he is dead there, but we couldn't recover him made me sick. I am glad I had the opportunity but wish I could have crossed the fence to find him. Just venting...
 

3855WIN

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Mississippi
That’s a tough one. Did you get your property owner involved?
Realistically, behind the shoulder but high is a dead deer. The bucks reaction sounds a lot more like a gut shot. Also a dead deer, but can take a while.
I would offer the farmer $500 for the deer head and see what he thinks about that.
 

morgaj1

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259
That’s a tough one. Did you get your property owner involved?
Realistically, behind the shoulder but high is a dead deer. The bucks reaction sounds a lot more like a gut shot. Also a dead deer, but can take a while.
I would offer the farmer $500 for the deer head and see what he thinks about that.
Yeah, the outfitter was involved and the farmer refused. When we jumped the buck up, the blood was on the shoulder. Regardless, I am confident that the deer was dead on the farmer’s property. Didn’t think of offering him $500...
 

2rocky

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Your experience is why I seldom wait before trailing a potentially poor rifle shot. Archery is different since animals need time to bleed out. My daughter hit her first buck high, dropped him in his tracks, and he was gone when we got there. Found him 200 yds down the creek at last light and finished him. I've also had one elk I had to follow up from a spine shocking hit . Those high shots don't leave hardly any blood trail and the follow up is usually a jump shoot.

Bummer you lost the buck. My condolences.
 

morgaj1

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Your experience is why I seldom wait before trailing a potentially poor rifle shot. Archery is different since animals need time to bleed out. My daughter hit her first buck high, dropped him in his tracks, and he was gone when we got there. Found him 200 yds down the creek at last light and finished him. I've also had one elk I had to follow up from a spine shocking hit . Those high shots don't leave hardly any blood trail and the follow up is usually a jump shoot.

Bummer you lost the buck. My condolences.
You’re right, just lamenting...
 

rjthehunter

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Oct 23, 2019
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Minnesota
Thankfully here in mn we can recover game from private land. I can't understand why other states don't allow that. It's awfully wasteful to not allow hunters to retrieve game. Then it makes us feel like shit for not making the perfect takedown shot. Something that has to make you feel sick.

What's the trespassing fine? Probably just a warning the first time.
 

Oak

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What's the trespassing fine? Probably just a warning the first time.
In Colorado, I can assure you that it would not just be a warning if the landowner wanted to press charges. And if you were able to recover the deer you would be charged with illegal possession of a deer ($700 and 15 points) on top of trespassing ($100 and 20 points). Add about 37% victim's compensation surcharge to those penalties as well. If you accrue 20 or more points within a 3-year period you are eligible for suspension of hunting privileges. Not trying to sound scary, just want to be sure everyone knows that in some places a warning is not likely.
 

Brian in Montana

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Ramsay, MT
Tough one. I had a similar experience years ago when I was a young man. I almost quit hunting over it. I don't think mine was as big as the one you describe though.

Hang in there brother. Deer are tough, you really never know. He might survive the wound.
 

willy

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Oct 10, 2013
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Not that this helps at all but it sounds like there is a historical negative issue between the outfitter and the neighboring landowner. That's too bad. Did you ask the outfitter if he had a prior to season/hunting discussion with the property owner regarding blood tracking onto neighboring properties? I think that is something the outfitter should have had covered/worked out prior or at least let hunters know the situation.
 

IAhawks84

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Feb 17, 2019
Messages
92
I've had that happen with archery. Here in iowa though we technically do not need permission to track the animal, but you cannot carry a weapon on private property. In my case I decided to talk to the farmer before going on his property. He was actually very grateful and said he realized I do not have to ask permission but he really appreciated it. He actually fired up his side by side and went with me to retrieve the buck. Even helped field dress him.
Top notch guy for sure.
 

ElkFever2

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Mar 4, 2019
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Iowa
Thankfully here in mn we can recover game from private land. I can't understand why other states don't allow that. It's awfully wasteful to not allow hunters to retrieve game. Then it makes us feel like shit for not making the perfect takedown shot. Something that has to make you feel sick.

What's the trespassing fine? Probably just a warning the first time.
 

Skiller

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Jan 21, 2012
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Rochert, MN NW MN, near Detroit Lakes, MN
RJ the Hunter, regarding Minnesota trespass and game retrieval, look at page 9 of the MN Hunting & Trapping Regulations. Legally posted land cannot be entered to retrieve game without getting permission. There is an exception for a person on foot to enter land that is not posted to retrieve a wounded wild animal that was lawfully shot, but may not remain on the land after being told to leave. Trespassing on posted land in any state is generally a serious deal. Minnesota has weak trespass penalties. I can assure hunters that the western states are a lot tougher on trespass. In the heavily forested parts of MN the State has allowed people to enter private land if not posted to retrieve hit game. This is mostly because in our heavy woods, it is hard to see signs and many people do not post. If the land is posted, different ball game. Get permission, preferably ahead of time.

I agree that the original poster's outfitter may not have had a good relationship with the neighbor who refused permission. I have a nice hunting property here in NW MN with fence sitting neighbors on a couple sides. We average a couple crippled deer (rifle season) each year from our neighbors. The neighbors are nice folks but pretty clueless on hunting ethics, marksmanship, etc. I contact them each year, wish them luck, and tell them to call me if they need to trail a deer onto my land, which is where most of them live anyway. I can usually assist them and get them their deer. Or, I find it and call them. I don't want 2 day a year hunters doing inadvertent deer drives while my family and I hunt our land.

I've been following this site for many years and never posted yet. I'm now 71 years old and have hunted deer for 61 seasons. I've done a LOT of hunting in Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, and several trips to Ontario, Saskatchewan, and a couple DIY trips to Alaska. I never had the courage or stupidity to trespass on someone else's land. Knowing the neighbors to the land you hunt is best and if not, you need to be a diplomat to get their OK to enter their land, in almost any case. I have turned in poachers and later heard that I was a real SOB. Then, they learned that I worked at having good land to hunt. If you ask to hunt you have a chance. If you don't ask, you are shit out of luck.

You can't blame land owners for posting land when a segment of our hunting brothers don't behave ethically as most Hunt Talkers try to do. Sorry for the long winded post. Should have introduded myself years ago. Lots of hunts in many parts of Montana over the years. Not climbing the mountains as well as way back, but still interested! Onward!! Dave.
 

westbranch

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Sep 11, 2017
Messages
613
Location
ID Panhandle
Thankfully here in mn we can recover game from private land. I can't understand why other states don't allow that. It's awfully wasteful to not allow hunters to retrieve game. Then it makes us feel like shit for not making the perfect takedown shot. Something that has to make you feel sick.

What's the trespassing fine? Probably just a warning the first time.

Looks like Skiller covered it. In MN that is only if the land is not posted. I know people in MN that have had a hard time getting trepassers charged. Doing it because you would only get a warning is a crappy move. Should always call/talk to the landowner first.
 

Katfishcharlie

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Sep 26, 2016
Messages
27
A buddy and I just got back from a whitetail hunt in Missouri. First, let me say, that I have never seen as many quality deer as I have on this trip. One day, I saw 89 does and 6 bucks, 3 of which were 7 or better. One of the days, I shot about a 160-165" ten point at 180 yards free handed. I hit him behind the shoulder, but a tad high. We waited 90 minutes to track him. About 70 yards from where I shot him, we jumped him up near a pond. He got up slowly and ran off, so we backed out. We came back the next morning and tracked him. About 20 yards from where we last saw him, we tracked him to the property line fence, which was only about 2 feet high. On that fence was hair and flesh, so we know he crossed there. To make a long story short, the neighboring farmer would not let us track the deer on his property, so we never recovered him. To know that he is dead there, but we couldn't recover him made me sick. I am glad I had the opportunity but wish I could have crossed the fence to find him. Just venting...
It happens. I was hunting with a friend once who did the same thing. It looked like he made a good shot, but the deer got up on our approach and took off. We tracked him till he crossed the property line and the same thing. Entry denied. Very frustrating. But what can you do?
 
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