camcorder for beginners

skimerhorn

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Joined
Oct 9, 2012
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697
Location
Ashland Va
I'd like to start trying to video my hunts. Can anyone recommend a camcorder that will fit a tripod and zoom that won't break the bank and easy to use?
 

Joe Hulburt

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Joined
Feb 23, 2012
Messages
1,230
Location
Oregon Coast
I have gotten the same inspiration lately. I guess hunting just isn't frustrating enough for me anymore. :D

Just ordered a Panasonic HC V550 from Amazon. IT seems like a pretty amazing little camera for the DIY film maker. 50X optical zoom and 90X intelligent zoom and it looks like the picture at 90X is pretty dang good. The little sucker is only $329 too! I remember the first video cam we bought being well over $1000 and it is sitting in the closet antiquated.

Check out this video test....
https://youtu.be/PDYVDVfXMa0

With a little luck I will be posting my first bear hunt video in the next couple weeks....
 

TimeOnTarget

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Joined
Feb 13, 2015
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1,303
Location
SD
That is a nice looking little cam Joe,

Although some of the videos i just watched on it, It sure looks like there is more than 90x worth of zoom there???
 

Dan O

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Oct 28, 2014
Messages
1,056
Location
Seeley Lake, Mt
I've been looking at the inexpensive models of canon and sony. It's confusing about the options available and low light use. The fact most do not have a view finder anymore adds to the questions. I'm curious what do most of the shows on tv use in the small handy cams?
 

Cornell2012

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Jun 8, 2009
Messages
605
Location
Portland, OR
Tips:
Optical zoom is way more important than digital zoom. You will want a lot of reach if you are trying to record critters more than 20 yards away.

If you are zoomed in on something (and even frequently if you are not), use a tripod. It may not look so bad when you are in the field or watching it on the screen, but when you take it home and look at it on a bigger screen, you'll regret it.

Besides that, have fun. Don't let trying to record a hunt ruin the fun of it. The point is to remember the good memories and not get in the way of actually making good memories.
 

WIbiggame

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Joined
Jan 5, 2013
Messages
612
Location
Wisconsin
I would recommend getting a DSLR camera. If you are looking at going the handy cam route ($600-$900) you can get a good DSLR for that price and have AWESOME video and can take GREAT pictures as well. There is a couple downsides to DSLR cameras that is the zoom is manual (on a dial) where as a handy cam you have a rocker. Also sound quality on the DSLR is a little lacking (for TV production use) but if you are just looking at saving your own memories for personal use the sound will not be an issue.

I also agree with Cornell 100% optical zoom is the only thing to really look at when looking at zoom capabilities digital zoom makes for a very grainy looking picture. Also a tripod or monopod are a MUST.
 

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