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Beginner-Roosevelt Elk Hunting

RugerHawg413

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Good Morning,
I recently put a post up on the "Big Three" section about wanting some info on drawing a tag and hunting Mountain Goats. And thank you to everyone that provided stories and info to that post, it was much appreciated! Like I said that post, that I have been on some big game hunts, but the two I really want to go on now are: Mountain Goats and/or Roosevelt Elk. I have hunted and killed a Rocky Mountain Elk before and that was a great hunt and hope to do it again someday when I can get another tag for one. But, Roosevelt Elk are something that I have always wanted to hunt as well. I love the type of forest they live in and just how massive animals they are. Seems like a great adventure and very fun hunt. So, that leads me to ask about drawing a tag for one of them. Which state is best for a non-resident, as I live in Arkansas.? And in that state which area is the best to hunt in? And if you know of any good outfitters in that state, that would be greatly appreciated?!


Please let me know what your thoughts regarding the questions above and your thoughts on Roosevelt elk hunting in general for a beginner. And anyone who has gone Roosevelt Elk hunting and knows what it is like to try to draw for a tag year in and year out. I would love to hear your stories and see your pictures from your hunt if you don’t mind sharing. Any wisdom that you have learned from your hunt that may help me avoid some beginner's mistakes, it would be greatly appreciated! All info, input, and wisdom are appreciated! Thank you!!
 
Washington is OTC for elk (you can try to draw special permits that give a better hunt too but extremely low odds). You would choose Western Washington for your elk tag. You would also choose modern firearm, archery or muzzleloader. Tough hunting, but I know some guys who usually get one or two out of their camp most years. Oregon is another option, but not familiar whether you have to draw there.
 
Washington is OTC for elk (you can try to draw special permits that give a better hunt too but extremely low odds). You would choose Western Washington for your elk tag. You would also choose modern firearm, archery or muzzleloader. Tough hunting, but I know some guys who usually get one or two out of their camp most years. Oregon is another option, but not familiar whether you have to draw there.
Understood, thank you for the info!
 
Good info from kwyeewyk.
I might add; You will most likely need a private timberland permit to hunt in most areas for Roosevelt elk in Washington. There is some N.F. land on the Olympic Peninsula but a lot of that area is special permit draw. Best bet - look at SW area of state specifically the Willapa Hill area. One private timberlands permit in that area is called Skidemore. A lot of Roosevelts are taken in the Mt St Helens area too. Weyerhaeuser land, and the permits go quick in the spring.
Another area to consider with out a private land permit is the Lewis river area. I have killed Roosevelts in all of these areas. None of this information is too secret, in Washington you will have company.
Good Luck.
 
Good info from kwyeewyk.
I might add; You will most likely need a private timberland permit to hunt in most areas for Roosevelt elk in Washington. There is some N.F. land on the Olympic Peninsula but a lot of that area is special permit draw. Best bet - look at SW area of state specifically the Willapa Hill area. One private timberlands permit in that area is called Skidemore. A lot of Roosevelts are taken in the Mt St Helens area too. Weyerhaeuser land, and the permits go quick in the spring.
Another area to consider with out a private land permit is the Lewis river area. I have killed Roosevelts in all of these areas. None of this information is too secret, in Washington you will have company.
Good Luck.
Understood! Thank you for the info!
 
Oregon has OTC roosevelt elk opportunities. Competition from other hunters is always high, but most don't leave the roads. Hiking old skid roads, ridgelines, big timber that is open, are all ways to find success. Its rarely spot and stalk, if you enjoy still hunting it can be a fun hunt.
 
Oregon has OTC roosevelt elk opportunities. Competition from other hunters is always high, but most don't leave the roads. Hiking old skid roads, ridgelines, big timber that is open, are all ways to find success. Its rarely spot and stalk, if you enjoy still hunting it can be a fun hunt.
Understood, thank you for the info!
 
If you want a true Roosevelt I would stick west of I-5 on the Olympic peninsula or the coastal area of Oregon. They take on the look of Rocky Mountain elk pretty quick the closer you get to the cascades. Even the wdfw regs state that technically the cascade crest is the dividing line but anything east of i5 is more likely a cross. There is a lot of land on the coast but like mentioned mainly timber land which all went to permits years ago now. I hunted that area back when it was all open and there are a lot of elk but it is thick. Never hunted Oregon coast but some beautiful area. I would venture to say the same is true with timber permits. There are some outfitters that hold permits in some of these areas which would greatly help you.
 
If you want a true Roosevelt I would stick west of I-5 on the Olympic peninsula or the coastal area of Oregon. They take on the look of Rocky Mountain elk pretty quick the closer you get to the cascades. Even the wdfw regs state that technically the cascade crest is the dividing line but anything east of i5 is more likely a cross. There is a lot of land on the coast but like mentioned mainly timber land which all went to permits years ago now. I hunted that area back when it was all open and there are a lot of elk but it is thick. Never hunted Oregon coast but some beautiful area. I would venture to say the same is true with timber permits. There are some outfitters that hold permits in some of these areas which would greatly help you.
Understood. Thank you for info, that is very helpful!!
 
In Oregon all archery tags are OTC and the season is a month long in September. For rifle season most of the area is OTC but you have to choose one of three hunts, two on the coast and one in the cascades. The first coastal hunt is four days long and the second is a week long. If you want to hunt the Cascades, then there is just one week long season. All rifle hunts are in November.
 
In Oregon all archery tags are OTC and the season is a month long in September. For rifle season most of the area is OTC but you have to choose one of three hunts, two on the coast and one in the cascades. The first coastal hunt is four days long and the second is a week long. If you want to hunt the Cascades, then there is just one week long season. All rifle hunts are in November.
Thank you for the info!! That is very helpful!!
 
I’ve spent a day or 2 in the Roosevelt Kingdom in the North Oregon Coast , November is wet nasty month, hunting can be in the upper 20’s into the low 50’s , some logging properties are walkin , some open there gates during rifle elk and allow drive in , Weyerhaeuser is permit only , the drive in permits are almost impossible to get anymore but walkin permits are still easy to get and you can access some good dirt that way

Rosie’s like to feed the clearcuts and hide in the thick reprod and heavy timber, they don’t migrate, you find an area they like they’ll always be around

IMG_7916.jpegIMG_7906.jpegIMG_7639.jpegIMG_7459.jpegIMG_7391.jpegIMG_7378.jpegIMG_7295.jpegIMG_6925.jpegIMG_6822.jpegIMG_6658.jpegIMG_6469.jpegIMG_5919.jpegIMG_5693.jpegIMG_4465.jpegIMG_4121.jpegIMG_0525.jpegIMG_3287.jpegIMG_2819.jpegIMG_2611.jpeg
 
I’ve spent a day or 2 in the Roosevelt Kingdom in the North Oregon Coast , November is wet nasty month, hunting can be in the upper 20’s into the low 50’s , some logging properties are walkin , some open there gates during rifle elk and allow drive in , Weyerhaeuser is permit only , the drive in permits are almost impossible to get anymore but walkin permits are still easy to get and you can access some good dirt that way

Rosie’s like to feed the clearcuts and hide in the thick reprod and heavy timber, they don’t migrate, you find an area they like they’ll always be around

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Understood. Thank you for the info and great pictures!!
 
Also ONX is a must , it’s so thick u need it to move around on foot if you need to cross some country , even behind a locked gate your gonna wanna walk the logging roads to navigate the country most of the time, even crossing an open clear cut can be a nasty experience as some are knee high in broken limbs and leftovers from a logging operation, and dangerous in November with ice on the branches IMG_0079.jpegIMG_0177.jpegIMG_0117.jpegIMG_0178.jpeg
 
Also ONX is a must , it’s so thick u need it to move around on foot if you need to cross some country , even behind a locked gate your gonna wanna walk the logging roads to navigate the country most of the time, even crossing an open clear cut can be a nasty experience as some are knee high in broken limbs and leftovers from a logging operation, and dangerous in November with ice on the branches View attachment 313180View attachment 313181View attachment 313182View attachment 313183
Wow! Understood. Thanks again for the info!
 
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