Binoculars That Restrict View Of Private Land? Potential New Market Trend.

Sytes

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I wonder if this enables the "freeloading" hunter to view our public wildlife on private land.
Second, who, on God's green earth, would want to join the demand side to purchase restrictive glass?
Private landowners?
Do they believe it will spark a trend w/ optics manufacturers, as a whole, to increase ROI w/annual subscription fees?

****

“First, landowners across the country are understanding the value of their viewscapes.
They’ve also recognized that hunters and wildlife watchers who observe their private lands are essentially freeloading, enjoying a resource that they neither own nor pay to use.
Second, services like Land Trust that provide recreational rentals are a perfect vehicle for monetizing these private viewscapes.
And lastly, the integration of digital technology in traditional optics has given us the ability to essentially lock and unlock the ability to view private lands in real time.”

“The PLOP is really saving the ‘Public Land Hunter’ from temptation, by keeping them from seeing the choice habitat and abundant wildlife on private lands unless they have a ClearView subscription.”

“We think our product solves conflicts like corner-crossing by essentially locking out what we call the ‘Lookie-Lou,’ those hunters who would never be tempted to cross a corner because they don’t know what’s on the other side.”

The first is our ancient tension between supply and demand,” says Stein. “The supply of private viewscapes is too valuable to simply give away, as we have in the past. The second is the old aphorism that good fences make good neighbors. You can really look at both ClearView and PLOP as just another type of fence that will make hunters much better neighbors.”

 
I wonder if this enables the "freeloading" hunter to view our public wildlife on private land.
Second, who, on God's green earth, would want to join the demand side to purchase restrictive glass?
Private landowners?
Do they believe it will spark a trend w/ optics manufacturers, as a whole, to increase ROI w/annual subscription fees?

****

“First, landowners across the country are understanding the value of their viewscapes.
They’ve also recognized that hunters and wildlife watchers who observe their private lands are essentially freeloading, enjoying a resource that they neither own nor pay to use.
Second, services like Land Trust that provide recreational rentals are a perfect vehicle for monetizing these private viewscapes.
And lastly, the integration of digital technology in traditional optics has given us the ability to essentially lock and unlock the ability to view private lands in real time.”

“The PLOP is really saving the ‘Public Land Hunter’ from temptation, by keeping them from seeing the choice habitat and abundant wildlife on private lands unless they have a ClearView subscription.”

“We think our product solves conflicts like corner-crossing by essentially locking out what we call the ‘Lookie-Lou,’ those hunters who would never be tempted to cross a corner because they don’t know what’s on the other side.”

The first is our ancient tension between supply and demand,” says Stein. “The supply of private viewscapes is too valuable to simply give away, as we have in the past. The second is the old aphorism that good fences make good neighbors. You can really look at both ClearView and PLOP as just another type of fence that will make hunters much better neighbors.”

My man, I think you just got got.
 
Apparently so. Lost in time from scuba yacht in red sea - just off the Zurich airport on a train. (2030hrs)

I thought something was odd about the, "opinion" portion.

Can't laugh at yourself, be damned to laugh at others. 🤣

Fully snockered.
We'll just blame it on decompression sickness! Looks like you had a blast, enjoyed your photos in the other thread.
 
I still remember as a little kid at Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, and Medora (and other national scenic areas) the time-limited binoculars you had to put a dime or quarter in to see anything. And when time expired the lenses were blocked. That was the start of me hating my government ;)
 
I still remember as a little kid at Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, and Medora (and other national scenic areas) the time-limited binoculars you had to put a dime or quarter in to see anything. And when time expired the lenses were blocked. That was the start of me hating my government ;)
And that was your first lesson billable hours.
 
Leupold BX-4 Rangefinding Binoculars

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