American Prairie Reserve - Nothing new

Gila

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New Mexico
Recent acquisitions by APR have prompted me to do a little research into what is going on. I believe that it is the right thing to do, to share this information so that people can make up their own minds and not be “hood winked” by those who stand to gain and profit from these “land grabs”. We had millions of acres here in New Mexico bought up by similar organizations like APR, maybe they are some of the same people. Quite a bit of that acquired land here is not open to the public for hunting or fishing. This land is for the most part, tied up in reserves, preserves, whatever label you want to put on it. Most of this land has been set aside for eco-tourism. Private parks for the wealthy and the upper echelon. This is an example:

Vermejo Park Ranch - Turner Enterprises

www.tedturner.com

www.tedturner.com
This huge buy out of private land has done little for public hunting opportunity in the form of public draw hunts here in New Mexico. The APR effort in Montana appears to be no different in my opinion, but I think people should have factual and accurate information to figure it all out for themselves. These are the words of the head honcho at APR, Sean Gerrity:

”The next phase is simply to keep going. We have numerous properties in the pipeline right now, so it's simply raise funds, buy properties, go on to the next one. Ever-increasing effort to get people out there to enjoy it. We have a campground where you can stay for $10, and we'll open more of those, and we're opening a high-end safari lodge like they have in Africa. We want to make it a world-class reserve like people have never seen in North America.”

I have been called a liar and all sorts of other names for putting the truth out there on another thread. They put words in my mouth and pushed that I said things that I never did. I live in the middle of the open range that has deeded acres. Grazing rights are leased. The only fences are around the ranch yards to keep the cattle out. Yup they have cattle drives and cowboys on horses rounding up the herds and separating them by brands. The last time I fished Fort Peck, which has been years ago now, it was the same way as it is here. Our meager local economy is based on cattle and grazing is shared, it is as simple as that. Fort Peck used to be no different.

www.theguardian.com

'I want to restart the golden age of conservation' – ex Valley entrepreneur

Yale Environment 360: Former Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Gerrity is trying to turn a swath of northeastern Montana into a prairie reserve teeming with herds of bison
www.theguardian.com

www.theguardian.com

https://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/08/travel/08journeys.html

My objective is to get the truth about these organizations out to the hunting and fishing public. Mr Gerrity has stated that his goal is to have “high end safaris”. What that means is that he intends to cater to the wealthy. Now I was called a liar for that on another thread. Yet there his words are in an interview with a creditable news source. They also said I was full of conspiracy theories when Gerrity’s vision of APR by his own words, is a prairie with wolves, bison, and cougar. The ones that were given their 30 pieces of silver from these organizations are the liars. They are the ones with the hidden agendas.

They said I lied because APR allows hunting. They put words in my mouth because I was referring to the Nature Conservancy lands. But at the time I made that statement, APR didn’t have any hunting on their properties. Now years later, they give out some tags. How much hunting is actually allowed there is still a mystery though. APR is doing this and that is a fact jack: “we're opening a high-end safari lodge like they have in Africa. We want to make it a world-class reserve like people have never seen in North America.”

Ted Turner and Jane Fonda have bought up millions of acres of prairie in various states. In New Mexico one of their primary objectives was to save endangered species. For instance on Vermejo ranch, if you go to that link I provided, you will see that their effort is to help save the black footed ferret. Thier solution was to increase the population of prairie dogs. Yea, they allow limited hunting on their properties. Twenty thousand for an elk hunt and $65,000 for a sheep hunt. And of course you get to stay in a lodge with 400 dollar a bottle champagne and russian caviar.

“The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is.”
——Winston Churchill
 

mtmiller

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Montana
For instance on Vermejo ranch, if you go to that link I provided, you will see that their effort is to help save the black footed ferret. Thier solution was to increase the population of prairie dogs.
I am sure folks will have plenty of fun with some of you info, but I will just touch on this one.

Since you brought this fact up, you must take issue. Appreciate if you could elaborate.
 

MTGomer

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MT —> AZ
It’s their property to do with what they want. They’re a hell of a lot better for the public than Murdoch or Wilks etc.

Never heard of an APR employee with a side arm harassing people on public roads for looking at elk.

Just having large swaths of private land, whether open for hunting or not, that’s managed for conservation is great for the adjacent public land hunter.

Most good hunting central and eastern Montana currently has, is on the private fringe, due to how liberally Montana allows harvest of everything, nearly all the time.
 

npaden

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Lubbock, Texas
P.S. Vermejo Park Ranch does allow hunting. High dollar stuff like a lot of other large private landowners.


I haven't seen any of the high dollar stuff on the APR although it's their business if they want to follow suit with the way most other large private landowners do things. I know they pretty much raffle off their bison tags for a very low price.

P.S. - Nearly all of the land that the APR has acquired was not open to public hunting before they acquired it. Most of it was either outfitted or limited to hunting by family and friends.
 

YukonGold

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Just having large swaths of private land, whether open for hunting or not, that’s managed for conservation is great for the adjacent public land hunter.
Came here to say this. 30,000-foot view, in the grand scheme of things, if the wildlife has nowhere to live then it doesn't much matter what public hunting opportunities exist. Here in the western part of the state, a very large proportion of elk and deer winter range is private land. I would much rather see a huge ranch conserved for bison or wolves or prairie dogs or "wildlife safaris" or whatever than turned into a subdivision. Funny how people complain about Turner's ranches for being exclusive but barely bat an eye when a huge swath of open lands suddenly has 200 homes on it and a bunch of Californians move in and start asking FWP to cull the deer eating their begonias.

Frankly, I don't even care about the Wilks or CB Ranch or Turner. I only wish they'd put conservation easements on their ranches, even if public access isn't part of the bargain. (And stop, ya know, pwning FWP over elk management. And I'd like to see FWP reduce pressure on public lands but that's a different matter.)
 

Straight Arrow

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... nefarious as wanting an unhindered pronghorn migration.
Not nearly as nefarious as removing fences and creating open range on deeded acres plus throughout grazing leases. But wait ... that's the open land condition the OP touts as desirable in his neighborhood! :rolleyes: The facts are so confusing.
 

nhenry

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Kansas
I'm just gonna say that the "head honcho" said there were campsites for $10 as well, and that they'd be opening more.

Safaris don't necessarily mean hunting, either. My buddy goes to Africa just to take photos from a landrover.

My point being: they're pandering to everyone, and people who are rich can contribute by staying in class. Big whoop.
 

Straight Arrow

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I only wish they'd put conservation easements on their ranches
In case you missed it in another thread, here it is again. (and easement protection is typical of Turner Enterprises properties).

The large grasslands foothills basin bumping up against the north face of the Spanish Peaks Wilderness is a beautiful example of bison ranch rotation on the famous Montana Flying D Ranch. IMO, it is one of the most gorgeous and natural looking landscapes in the world, replete with wildlife of many species indigenous to the west. Regardless of one's opinion of Ted Turner, you must feel gratitude for his conservation easement on that land. Otherwise, as so close to Bozeman it would likely be filled with Mcmansions, condos, boutiques, and neon signs!

Plus you can drive through the private ranch property on a public road to access the Spanish Peaks trailhead and trails which skirt some of the ranch property, but are open for access to the public lands.
 

YukonGold

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In case you missed it in another thread, here it is again. (and easement protection is typical of Turner Enterprises properties).

The large grasslands foothills basin bumping up against the north face of the Spanish Peaks Wilderness is a beautiful example of bison ranch rotation on the famous Montana Flying D Ranch. IMO, it is one of the most gorgeous and natural looking landscapes in the world, replete with wildlife of many species indigenous to the west. Regardless of one's opinion of Ted Turner, you must feel gratitude for his conservation easement on that land. Otherwise, as so close to Bozeman it would likely be filled with Mcmansions, condos, boutiques, and neon signs!

Plus you can drive through the private ranch property on a public road to access the Spanish Peaks trailhead and trails which skirt some of the ranch property, but are open for access to the public lands.
Thanks, I'm not as familiar with Turner ranches. I think CB has part of their property in CE but not all, and Wilks...guessing not a chance in hell.
 

brocksw

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North Dakota
So let me get this straight. The AP buys 118,371 acres, makes 79,000 (67%) of it open to hunting (I've hunted multiple AP properties for elk and deer). Another 334,817 acres are public lands leased by American Prairie (also open to hunting). They even allow hunters to cross the deeded properties that are not open to hunting, in order to access their leased public lands for the purpose of hunting (This is significant in it's own right considering existing legal battles). This is all right on their website, on the "Hunting" page. They also tell you where these acres are and encourage you to come visit.

But the OP discovered the REAL TRUTH!! It's all just a conspiracy to end hunting! Their plan to end hunting starts with opening more land to hunting!

“The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is.”
——Winston Churchill


I think I may up my sustaining monthly contribution to the AP, just because of this thread.
 
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Straight Arrow

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There we were, on our high-end rattlesnake, prairie dog, and bison safari, staying at the APR campground for ten bucks in our 1995 Pacer luxury camper mounted on the 2005 Dodge Ram world class reserve touring vehicle with the scratched up front bumper. The trails are free and wide open if you are wealthy enough to own hiking footwear.
2005 DODGE RAM 3500.JPG
APR prairie dog.JPG
Bison at APR campground.JPG
 
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