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Weatherby Vangaurd .300 WBY Mag (Long Range?)

GearJunky

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Aug 7, 2014
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Guys, I need some of your wisdom.

I did some gear swapping and ended up with a new gun and a new scope, so trying to decided where to go from here.

I just acquired a Weatherby Vangaurd .300 WBY magnum with a composite stock and a Vortex Viper PST FFP 4-16x50 scope with the MOA reticles. I am not a big fan of large caliber rifles, and I prefer to stick with my .270. However, I am curious about the idea of extending my range on elk and making longer shots at the range. I currently limit my elk shots to 300 yds, with my .270.

So is this gun worth spending time and money to see if I can make it a shooter, or would I be better off selling it and starting with something different? Online, it looks like the gun used to get you maybe $500 - $550. Biggest downfall I see currently is the ammo prices for this thing, I don't reload.

Any input is appreciated. I will try to dig up some more info on the rifle... but it appears to be the same as this one. My serial number is VS146103

http://www.armslist.com/posts/37172...le--weatherby-vanguard--300-wby-mag-synthetic
 
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MKotur325

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I am not a big fan of large caliber rifles, and I prefer to stick with my .270.

I think you just answered your own question...

If you prefer to stick with a lighter recoiling rifle, there's nothing wrong with your .270.

2 quick questions.

1. Why do you limit your shots to 300yds with your .270?
2. What sort of ranges are you wanting to shoot at? Have there been many situations where you missed opportunities with your .270 and the 300yd cap?
 

GearJunky

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1. two parts to my answer. I currently feel comfortable out to 300 yards, and for elk I like to keep the Kinetic energy at or above that 1700 ft-lb range.

2. Currently I keep sneaking on them until I reach that 300 yard range, so I have lost some elk. However, the last two elk I shot at, I have killed. Two years ago I made a 250 yard shot and this year I I shot a bull at 307 yards. It would be nice to feel real comfortable making 500 yard shots if needed. The area I hunt has lots of flat prairie, so seeing elk usually isn't the problem, it's getting close.

-----------------------------
The input that would be real helpful is if anyone has some good real world experience with this gun, either the model or the caliber. I would be curious to know if people say the gun is a "lower" model and so it's tough to get it to drive tacks at 500 yds (I have heard people are liking the new Vanguard V2's, so what has changed from the original vanguard). Or, does anyone have the experience to say that it costs an arm and a leg to burn through this ammo, so it's just not a real shooters gun, unless you need the magnum power to kill big things.
 
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dalbo

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Mar 7, 2012
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Mesa, AZ
I have a 257 Wby. and 30-06 Vanguard (older version), they are good, consistent shooters. Accuracy for most factory and handloads ranges from .75"-1.25".

I shot a friend's new model Vanguard in 300 Win. it shot well and recoil was not as hard as I thought a 300 Mag would be. I'm not sure how I feel about the 2 stage trigger on the new models, the second stage was light and crisp though. The new version is supposed to be sub-MOA, other than that the new stock is more angular, grey and has the rubberized grip panels.

The bad news about the 300 Wby. Vanguard is that it only has a 24" barrel vs. the MK V's 26" tube so essentially you are getting 300 Win Mag velocity from ammo that is around twice the price and harder to find.

Weatherby sells a bargain load made by Norma in 257 and 300 Wby. that cost less than $40, their other premium loads sell for around $80 a box.
 

.280 Remington

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Aug 21, 2012
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Vanguards are good rifles. Just a Howa in disguise.

I like the .300 WBY too. I have one and carry it often.

As far as the ammo goes, it is expensive if you don't reload. I reload. Maybe you can find a buddy to help you out? Just make sure he's trustworthy and doesn't try to hot rod your rifle.
 

ccc23454

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its a great rifle! i own several vanguards and one 300wby but its in a MarkV. all my weatherbys shot submoa and several shot around .5 moa. my 300 is my go to mountain and elk rifle as its in a ultralight and shots 2.5" groups all day at 500 yards. i will tell you that i do handload so that makes it cheaper to shot and more accurate. the $37 box ammo is great for deer sized but would probably what something better for long range let alone elk. i use 200 grain accubonds smoking out of a 26" barrel and its about the perfect elk setup in my opinion. the older vanguards (like in link) had cheap flimsy stock and triggers that were hit or miss (some great some BAD). if i wanted to try and to stretch out the shot length with that rifle i would buy a B&C medalist stock, maybe a new trigger. you will not likely get $550ish for a used rifle if its stock as you can buy a new model for cheaper than that brand new. there are a still a few shops selling the old models new for around $350ish (stainless add $100ish). whatever you decide resell your brass for about $15 a box of 20 to help cover your ammo expenses. weatherbys aren't for everyone but those who like them typically find them very addictive and amazing hunting rifles even the "cheap" version vanguards.
 

1_pointer

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1. two parts to my answer. I currently feel comfortable out to 300 yards, and for elk I like to keep the Kinetic energy at or above that 1700 ft-lb range.

2. Currently I keep sneaking on them until I reach that 300 yard range, so I have lost some elk. However, the last two elk I shot at, I have killed. Two years ago I made a 250 yard shot and this year I I shot a bull at 307 yards. It would be nice to feel real comfortable making 500 yard shots if needed. The area I hunt has lots of flat prairie, so seeing elk usually isn't the problem, it's getting close.

-----------------------------
The input that would be real helpful is if anyone has some good real world experience with this gun, either the model or the caliber. I would be curious to know if people say the gun is a "lower" model and so it's tough to get it to drive tacks at 500 yds (I have heard people are liking the new Vanguard V2's, so what has changed from the original vanguard). Or, does anyone have the experience to say that it costs an arm and a leg to burn through this ammo, so it's just not a real shooters gun, unless you need the magnum power to kill big things.
In response to your two answers:
1. I wouldn't worry about "kinetic energy" if you are only wanting to shoot to 500yds. Bullet placement and construction, in that order are much more important. A 300 Weatherby with a light for caliber varmint type bullet would probably have more energy at 500yds than say a good big game 150gr bullet out of your 270, but would be a less ideal elk chambering.
2. Either of the two rifles are capable, IMO, of taking elk at 500yds. Use good, high BC bullets in either and practice until you are confident at the distance you want to shoot to.

The gun is likely more than accurate enough to make 500yd shots given the right ammo/load. I don't know all the differences between the 2 models, but I think a stock change and a different trigger were the main ones. If you want to shoot enough to shoot long with a 300 Weatherby you'll probably need to take up handloading as the 300 ammo is expensive. My suggestion is to sell the 300 and put the new scope on the 270. Use the money from the rifle sale to buy a handloading set up and work up a load using a high BC hunting bullet for the 270. The Nosler Accubonds is probably where I'd start. If you just don't want to handload, find a good factory load for the 270 and use the rifle money to buy as much of that in the same lot number as you can.
 

Sawtooth

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I would agree with 1 pointer's statements. I have a .270 win in the old Weatherby Vanguard rifle that I have been shooting for the last 25 years. Great rifle that shoots sub MOA with several different handloads. Regardless of which rifle you chose to shoot out to 500 yards, I think you will want to start reloading as this will allow you to fine tune your ammo to match your rifle. The best groups I have been able to get with factory ammo in my 270 are right at 1 MOA. But with a slight change in powder charge it will drop to half that size. What kind of groups are you getting out of your .270 right now with factory ammo?
 

bkondeff

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Jul 7, 2007
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I reload. Don't own a 300Weatherby, but load and shoot a buddy's.

While I agree on the benefits of relaoding, it is more of a commitment than some want and frankly if you don't feel motivated to get proficient at it, you won't be able to match Premium brands that are available.

I don't agree that a .270 should be your go to choice for elk to 500yds. I too use KE as a limit for elk, though I believe what ever caliber you choose you must be able to shoot it well, which takes practice.

So, I would suggest you pick up a couple of boxes of quality ammo and take her out for a spin. If she shoots well, including at distance, and you feel you can manage that recoil enough to get through a couple of boxes of expensive ammo a year to get proficient, you will be better prepared when the opportunity arises in the field. My guess is the recoil may send you in a different direction, or simply keep you and your .270 looking for a good 300 yard opportunity. PS This is why I like 7mm Mag with 160gr+ bullets.
 

Sawtooth

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Though I agree that the 270 is not my first choice for a 500 yard gun on elk, if you are only going to shoot two boxes of ammo though a gun each year, you have no business shooting that gun at any animal at 500 yards.
 

Gr8bawana

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With the .300 mag you get a double bonus every time you pull the trigger because it kills at both ends!
 

Mthuntinfool

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I second what everyone has said pretty much. Take the 300 out and see what its capable of, and then make your decision. If you shoot a quality bullet out of your 270, you will have no problem killing elk at 500 yards. My brother killed his bull last year at 490 yards with a custom 270 shooting my handloads with 130 gr hornady sst bullets. One shot put it on the ground.
 

GearJunky

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Aug 7, 2014
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Thanks for all the input. I am right in line with many of your thoughts! I already unmounted the scope from the .300 and had it mounted on my .270. The .300 is going to go in my gun safe for the day that I might need a larger caliber.

For a plan forward, I am going to see how I like shooting this scope with my .270. I failed to mention that my close friend reloads, but only .270 ammo, as that is what he shoots. So ammo isn't a concern for my .270 nor is grouping the rounds. I shoot a tikka t3 and I haven't ever measured the groups, but it's not uncommon to have 3 rounds touching at 100 yards.

For now the idea will be... see how I like the scope. I still anticipate to keep my elk shots in the 300 yard range, but now I will have the advantage to go out for longer ranges on a wolf, coyote or targets!
 
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