Caribou Gear

Super adjustable bows?

jquigley

Active member
Joined
Jan 26, 2015
Messages
244
Location
Missoula, MT
So I'm considering taking the plunge and getting my first bow. I figure it will give me more time in the woods and I can practice in a friend's backyard when I can't get to a range and practice with my rifle. The bows that keep drawing my eye are the really adjustable ones like the Bowtech Fuel and the Mission Riot, but I have trouble finding any unbiased information about these models.

What is the reputation on the market for these types of bows? Are they made primarily for kids who are growing into them? I've had multiple surgeries on my right shoulder, so the ability to adjust the draw strength as I build strength there sounds appealing. On the other hand, I don't want to invest a decent amount of money and feel like I outgrow the quality of the bow to quickly.

Any thoughts or direction would be immensely appreciated.
 

6speed

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Joined
Jan 13, 2011
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1,209
Location
Idaho
I started with a Bowtech Assassin and it was a great bow the Fuel took it's place and is more adjustable. It should be as good our better.
 

whiskeydog

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Joined
Oct 17, 2011
Messages
701
Location
Billings, MT
I started with the Mission Maniac which is probably the precursor to the Riot. I used it for 4 years before upgrading. When I first started, I couldn't tell the difference between the Mission line and the higher end ones...after shooting for 4 years and then switching, there was a big difference, but I was definitely happy with the Mission bow for a stater. I don't think you can go wrong as it's about 1/2 the cost of some of the higher end ones.
 

jquigley

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Jan 26, 2015
Messages
244
Location
Missoula, MT
Thanks for the advice guys! I think both the Mission and the Bowtech line make ready to hunt packages, which might be a good fit to start.
 

J Elky

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2009
Messages
48
Location
Central Minnesota
I currently shoot a Mission Venture, I think it adjusts from 30-60#. I used to shoot a Bowtech Allegiance at 60# but I developed shoulder problems and could no longer shoot it. I bought the Mission and started out at 35#. It took a long time but I am now shooting about 50-55# with no problems. I bought mine used off Archerytalk, actually I have bought and sold 3-4 bows there with no issues.
 

jquigley

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Joined
Jan 26, 2015
Messages
244
Location
Missoula, MT
Sounds like I may need to sign up for archerytalk's forums. Found a ton of the Mission Riots on craigslist, just not sure the savings is worth the risk of used from a stranger and I assume there will be some cost in setting the rig up.
 

2rocky

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Joined
Jul 23, 2010
Messages
2,898
You should buy your first bow from a Pro shop. Get fitted right, get properly spined arrows cut to the right length, and get comfortable and accurate with Entry Level components.

After you get comfortable with shooting consistently you can start building and fletching your own arrows, and ugrade a dropaway rest, experiment with different releases, etc.
 

slpeirce

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Joined
Jul 11, 2011
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4
Location
Smithfield,Va
Both would be good, I would look for which bow has a the greater brace height , they a more forgiving but you are giving up speed.
 

Epfd217

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Joined
Feb 26, 2014
Messages
373
Location
Eden Prairie, Minnesota
I have no experience with the Bowtech you mentioned, but my buddy shoots Bowtech and has several of them and likes them alot. They had some quality problems with their limbs several years ago, but they seems to be on the right track now. I havne't heard anything in a while.

I do have a Mission bow and they are made by Mathews. I have a Mission Craze for my daughters. I really like that the Craze can be adjusted from super low (for the kids) up to 70lbs for me. They are great bows and they are very reliable all the way through their adjustment range.

I don't see the ultra-adjustability changing anything in the top level bow market, but they are a great option for people looking into the mid-price range bows as well as bows for youth and new shooters who will need the adjustability.

I will second the comment to visit a prop shop. Get your size figured out and shoot both of the bows. Inevitably one of them will "feel" better to you and you will find your bow. If you want to buy used, don't be afraid. My first two bows were used as I learned to shoot and learned what I wanted and needed in a bow. Don't drop a dollar without shooting and testing the bow, but don't be afraid to try used.
 

jquigley

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Joined
Jan 26, 2015
Messages
244
Location
Missoula, MT
Thanks for the advice guys. The bargain hunter in me always likes to buy used but I think you're right about the pro shop.

There is one I found near me, in a guys basement. He's 93 years old and temporarily closed because he just had a hip replacement and can't get downstairs to his shop. But, he has competed in the olympics several times and offers a free instruction session with purchase, might be my ticket to a new bow.
 

jquigley

Active member
Joined
Jan 26, 2015
Messages
244
Location
Missoula, MT
Took everyone's advice and went to a pro shop a couple hours from town. Shot a few different bows and think I've settled on either the mission venture or the riot. Really enjoyed shooting both. Going to see if any of the other shops around have decent used sections, but either way I doubt I'll be bowless for much longer.

Thanks again for all the advice!
 

huntlife

New member
Joined
Dec 22, 2014
Messages
118
Location
chasing the herd
Ill give you some really good advice. I worked in a pro shop for a few years and I helped a lot of guys get started. Regardless of the bow you choose, make sure the draw length fits you! If its to short, youll never hold steady. If its to long, youll hit your arm, and thats no fun at all! Next, make sure the draw weight fits you. Start off at like 50lbs and work your way up. Ive seen loads of guys wanting to start out at 70 or 80 and all they do is pull muscles and loose interest.Start now. Shoot some 3-d tournaments during the spring and summer to get comfortable with your bow and to practice judging yardage.
 
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