Summary of 12/16/21 CPW regional Round Table meeting, current issues.

elkduds

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Colorado Sportsperson’s Roundtable December 16, 2021, 12:00 – 1:00 pm Virtual Summary Director’s Welcome Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) Director Dan Prenzlow welcomed the group for this virtual check-in meeting. He provided updates on staffing, including the departure of CPW Deputy Director Carlee Koutnik and the naming of Travis Black as the new Northwest Regional Manager. Director Prenzlow mentioned the recent two-day joint meeting of the Stakeholder Advisory Group (SAG) and Technical Working Group (TWG) who are providing input to inform development of a wolf restoration and management plan; additional information about the planning process is available at https://www.wolfengagementco.org/.

The next Parks and Wildlife Commission meeting will be on January 12-13, 2022 and will be a virtual meeting in accordance with guidance from the Governor’s office. We will reach out in early 2022 about scheduling the next meeting of the Sportsperson’s Roundtable for February/March.

Wolf Restoration and Management CPW Assistant Director, Aquatic, Terrestrial and Natural Resources Reid DeWalt noted that the wolf restoration and management planning process has achieved several milestones. In November, Eric Odell (CPW Species Conservation Program Manager) presented a restoration logistics report to the Commission, summarizing feedback from the TWG on restoration logistics such as considerations for capture, animal handling and reintroduction. At the same Commission meeting, Julie Shapiro from the Keystone Policy Center presented the Summer 2021 Public Engagement Report, summarizing public input provided over the summer from more than 3,400 people. As mentioned by Director Prenzlow, the SAG and TWG held their first joint meeting and focused largely on compensation planning for livestock depredation by wolves. In early 2022, the groups are expected to wrap up the compensation discussions and start moving into wolf management. A draft restoration and management plan is expected in late 2022 and will be available for public review. A roundtable member asked whether impacts of wolves on outfitters was being discussed. Reid said that impacts on outfitters has been raised as a consideration but the emphasis has been on impacts to livestock producers. Reid closed with an update on the pack in Jackson County and encouraged roundtable members to contact CPW if you see other wolves.

Legislative Update CPW Assistant Director, Research, Policy and Planning Jeff Ver Steeg, provided an overview of the upcoming legislative session. Topics that may be addressed this session include: Reauthorization of the Habitat Partnership Program The Habitat Partnership Program is a partnership between CPW and private landowners to reduce big game conflicts and assist CPW in meeting game management objectives. Proposed legislation would permanently authorize the program’s funding mechanism, make administrative improvements and expand access to the grant funds to areas outside of local communities when needed. Reauthorization of the Nongame Species Tax Checkoff This bill would reauthorize the nongame tax checkoff available on Colorado tax forms. Donations from the checkoff supports 750 species that cannot be hunted or fished. Portions of these funds also support wildlife rehabilitation centers that have been certified by CPW. Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) Exemptions for Sensitive Wildlife Data This legislation would create an exemption to CORA to allow CPW to withhold records regarding sensitive wildlife data. Currently the division has no ability to withhold sensitive information pertaining to wildlife on publicly-owned lands that could be used for commercial purposes or to circumvent fair chase. Colorado Backcountry Search and Rescue Working Group Recommendations This bill would implement suggestions put forward by the Backcountry Search and Rescue Working Group that was established by SB21-245. The bill will determine the appropriate location and structure for a new Search and Rescue program in state government. Species Conservation Trust Fund (SCTF) This is an annual Department of Natural Resources (DNR) bill that authorizes expenditures from the Species Conservation Trust Fund for projects that include habitat improvements, research and wildlife monitoring for species of conservation concern. In addition to these bills, CPW/DNR are seeking money and staffing in the Division’s budget for key programs like:  Implementing the Future Generations Act, including measures like hatchery modernization, maintaining parks and wildlife areas and responding to increasing demand for outdoor recreation.  Standing up outdoor regional partnership coalitions to identify, plan and help resolve conservation and recreation challenges across the state.  Expanding the Colorado Wildlife Council’s ability to spend revenue to increase awareness about the benefits of hunting and fishing in Colorado.  Upgrading the law enforcement database and radios  Completing broadband and sewer projects at rural parks. It was mentioned that there may be a wildlife corridors bill as well. A question was asked about whether federal stimulus money might be used for the broadband improvements and it was clarified that it is federal stimulus funds that are being sought for this work. DNR also has a recovery officer who is looking into other opportunities for CPW to take advantage of the stimulus money.

Open Roundtable Limited archery Roger Cesario inquired about how limited archery could be brought forward as a topic. Cory Chick, Southwest Regional Manager, responded about how the current Big Game Season Structure (BGSS) contemplates one-off changes, such as limiting archery elk licenses in Game Management Units 80 and 81 which the Commission is expected to take action on in January. Several members of the roundtable expressed a desire to see limited archery statewide sooner than the next BGSS. Partners in the Outdoors Conference Willie Kalaskie shared that the next Partners in the Outdoors Conference will be on April 18- 20 in Vail. The new location increases the conference capacity. Information about submitting session proposals was shared with the roundtable after this meeting and the conference website is here. Rocky Mountain Heroes Foundation Brian “Sol” Soliday spoke about his work with the Rocky Mountain Heroes Foundation taking out first time youth hunters. He thanked Pepper, Tracy, and Kathy from CPW for helping with the foundation’s work, recently taking out 15 first time youth hunters. Search and Rescue Kim Kokesh asked for more information about how the Search and Rescue program is currently operating and mentioned difficulty getting equipment grants and mileage reimbursement. Jeff reiterated that there is working group looking at how Search and Rescue is operating and trying to quantify funding needs. The working group will come back with recommendations for where the program is housed in state government and how to increase funding. There was discussion about how most of the search and rescue funding comes from sportpersons buying licenses but that most rescues are not for sportspeople. Justin Rutter, CPW Chief Financial Officer, mentioned that $3.5 million was appropriated to the Department of Local Affairs last session for search and rescue and that the Keep Colorado Wild Pass legislation also includes search and rescue as a priority.

Capital Development Committee CPW Northeast Regional Manager Mark Leslie shared that the Capital Development Committee of the Colorado General Assembly recently approved four CPW projects: 1) Twin Spruce Ponds fishing access; 2) Colorado Clays shooting range; 3) a project on Douglas Mountain in Clear Creek County to protect bighorn sheep; and 4) water rights for Castlewood Canyon. Storm damage Willie Kalaskie inquired about any damage to CPW facilities from a recent storm with high winds. Brett Ackerman, Southeast Regional Manager, said there was some damage at John Martin and to the concessionaire at the Lake Pueblo marina.
 

SageSam

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Colorado Sportsperson’s Roundtable December 16, 2021, 12:00 – 1:00 pm Virtual Summary Director’s Welcome Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) Director Dan Prenzlow welcomed the group for this virtual check-in meeting. He provided updates on staffing, including the departure of CPW Deputy Director Carlee Koutnik and the naming of Travis Black as the new Northwest Regional Manager. Director Prenzlow mentioned the recent two-day joint meeting of the Stakeholder Advisory Group (SAG) and Technical Working Group (TWG) who are providing input to inform development of a wolf restoration and management plan; additional information about the planning process is available at https://www.wolfengagementco.org/.

The next Parks and Wildlife Commission meeting will be on January 12-13, 2022 and will be a virtual meeting in accordance with guidance from the Governor’s office. We will reach out in early 2022 about scheduling the next meeting of the Sportsperson’s Roundtable for February/March.

Wolf Restoration and Management CPW Assistant Director, Aquatic, Terrestrial and Natural Resources Reid DeWalt noted that the wolf restoration and management planning process has achieved several milestones. In November, Eric Odell (CPW Species Conservation Program Manager) presented a restoration logistics report to the Commission, summarizing feedback from the TWG on restoration logistics such as considerations for capture, animal handling and reintroduction. At the same Commission meeting, Julie Shapiro from the Keystone Policy Center presented the Summer 2021 Public Engagement Report, summarizing public input provided over the summer from more than 3,400 people. As mentioned by Director Prenzlow, the SAG and TWG held their first joint meeting and focused largely on compensation planning for livestock depredation by wolves. In early 2022, the groups are expected to wrap up the compensation discussions and start moving into wolf management. A draft restoration and management plan is expected in late 2022 and will be available for public review. A roundtable member asked whether impacts of wolves on outfitters was being discussed. Reid said that impacts on outfitters has been raised as a consideration but the emphasis has been on impacts to livestock producers. Reid closed with an update on the pack in Jackson County and encouraged roundtable members to contact CPW if you see other wolves.

Legislative Update CPW Assistant Director, Research, Policy and Planning Jeff Ver Steeg, provided an overview of the upcoming legislative session. Topics that may be addressed this session include: Reauthorization of the Habitat Partnership Program The Habitat Partnership Program is a partnership between CPW and private landowners to reduce big game conflicts and assist CPW in meeting game management objectives. Proposed legislation would permanently authorize the program’s funding mechanism, make administrative improvements and expand access to the grant funds to areas outside of local communities when needed. Reauthorization of the Nongame Species Tax Checkoff This bill would reauthorize the nongame tax checkoff available on Colorado tax forms. Donations from the checkoff supports 750 species that cannot be hunted or fished. Portions of these funds also support wildlife rehabilitation centers that have been certified by CPW. Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) Exemptions for Sensitive Wildlife Data This legislation would create an exemption to CORA to allow CPW to withhold records regarding sensitive wildlife data. Currently the division has no ability to withhold sensitive information pertaining to wildlife on publicly-owned lands that could be used for commercial purposes or to circumvent fair chase. Colorado Backcountry Search and Rescue Working Group Recommendations This bill would implement suggestions put forward by the Backcountry Search and Rescue Working Group that was established by SB21-245. The bill will determine the appropriate location and structure for a new Search and Rescue program in state government. Species Conservation Trust Fund (SCTF) This is an annual Department of Natural Resources (DNR) bill that authorizes expenditures from the Species Conservation Trust Fund for projects that include habitat improvements, research and wildlife monitoring for species of conservation concern. In addition to these bills, CPW/DNR are seeking money and staffing in the Division’s budget for key programs like:  Implementing the Future Generations Act, including measures like hatchery modernization, maintaining parks and wildlife areas and responding to increasing demand for outdoor recreation.  Standing up outdoor regional partnership coalitions to identify, plan and help resolve conservation and recreation challenges across the state.  Expanding the Colorado Wildlife Council’s ability to spend revenue to increase awareness about the benefits of hunting and fishing in Colorado.  Upgrading the law enforcement database and radios  Completing broadband and sewer projects at rural parks. It was mentioned that there may be a wildlife corridors bill as well. A question was asked about whether federal stimulus money might be used for the broadband improvements and it was clarified that it is federal stimulus funds that are being sought for this work. DNR also has a recovery officer who is looking into other opportunities for CPW to take advantage of the stimulus money.

Open Roundtable Limited archery Roger Cesario inquired about how limited archery could be brought forward as a topic. Cory Chick, Southwest Regional Manager, responded about how the current Big Game Season Structure (BGSS) contemplates one-off changes, such as limiting archery elk licenses in Game Management Units 80 and 81 which the Commission is expected to take action on in January. Several members of the roundtable expressed a desire to see limited archery statewide sooner than the next BGSS. Partners in the Outdoors Conference Willie Kalaskie shared that the next Partners in the Outdoors Conference will be on April 18- 20 in Vail. The new location increases the conference capacity. Information about submitting session proposals was shared with the roundtable after this meeting and the conference website is here. Rocky Mountain Heroes Foundation Brian “Sol” Soliday spoke about his work with the Rocky Mountain Heroes Foundation taking out first time youth hunters. He thanked Pepper, Tracy, and Kathy from CPW for helping with the foundation’s work, recently taking out 15 first time youth hunters. Search and Rescue Kim Kokesh asked for more information about how the Search and Rescue program is currently operating and mentioned difficulty getting equipment grants and mileage reimbursement. Jeff reiterated that there is working group looking at how Search and Rescue is operating and trying to quantify funding needs. The working group will come back with recommendations for where the program is housed in state government and how to increase funding. There was discussion about how most of the search and rescue funding comes from sportpersons buying licenses but that most rescues are not for sportspeople. Justin Rutter, CPW Chief Financial Officer, mentioned that $3.5 million was appropriated to the Department of Local Affairs last session for search and rescue and that the Keep Colorado Wild Pass legislation also includes search and rescue as a priority.

Capital Development Committee CPW Northeast Regional Manager Mark Leslie shared that the Capital Development Committee of the Colorado General Assembly recently approved four CPW projects: 1) Twin Spruce Ponds fishing access; 2) Colorado Clays shooting range; 3) a project on Douglas Mountain in Clear Creek County to protect bighorn sheep; and 4) water rights for Castlewood Canyon. Storm damage Willie Kalaskie inquired about any damage to CPW facilities from a recent storm with high winds. Brett Ackerman, Southeast Regional Manager, said there was some damage at John Martin and to the concessionaire at the Lake Pueblo marina.
Many thanks for the notes
 

elkduds

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
2,881
Location
CO Springs.
Many thanks for the notes
Glad to do it. I view posting them as part of my responsibility as member of CPW Sportspeople's Round table. As much as possible, I summarize issues and concerns from forums in representing sportsmen and women. My subjective sense is that CPW staff does listen to Roundtable input, does not give it extra weight compared to other public comment sources. I suspect a flood of phone calls and emails from hunters and anglers is the best way to impact CPW decisions. You will see that several posters here attend the Wildlife Commission's virtual meetings to give their opinions directly, and whenever CPW posts a survey, absolutely respond to it and share it w others who fish/hunt/camp Colorado.

RE proposed legislation to ban bobcat and lion hunting, that proposal did not originate from CPW. Address your grievances to state legislators who keep trying to undermine CPW's wildlife management w ballot-box bullchit. That is why we have to spend millions of taxpayer $ of wolf reintroduction, CPW always opposed that until it was on the ballot, @ which point they are prohibited from commenting on it. CPW was opposed to wolf reintroduction for decades before CO voters chose it.
 

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