Kansas Turkey Adventures

AARONB

New member
Joined
Sep 5, 2018
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10
Location
Western KS
Thanks for posting how your season has been going. I've enjoyed reading them. We've finally had nice weather after the rain moved out. I hope you've had some time to go hunting and not got stuck on some muddy roads. Good luck!
 

kansasdad

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 30, 2011
Messages
3,781
Location
Wichita
Wednesday evening I hot footed it out of town, as I knew that the public wildlife area that I think I know like my own backyard was going to show extreme environment changes due to rain events in south central Kansas and subsequent lake levels rising. 6 feet above normal pool level, the lake and its tributaries had swollen and pushed critters out of their normal habitats.

Fields planted to corn and milo along the lake and creeks on the upper end were partially covered with water. Walking in, I was seeing deer beds in places I have rarely seen deer beds. The forests at the lake's edge were 5 feet under water, and the deer were seeking high ground along the fields edges.

I decided to go the "backdoor" way to get to "my" field, and hoped that the water levels would still allow me to get to where I wanted. Knowing that the deer were hanging out away from the lake's edge, I surmised that the turkeys may be doing the same, so I "hunted" my way down the treeline instead of walking at "hospital speed" as my dad used to say when he wanted me to move quickly from one horse hospital stables to the other. Two small field runoff cuts that normally would be damp after a rain required a full on jump to pass over. Continuing towards my targeted field, I kicked several more deer out of their unusual beds. And once on the move, they all seemed to mimic zombies with a slightly out of body experience look to their escape. It took me a moment, but I realized that I have seen that body language before in humans......Kansas residents coming out of their homes to examine what a tornado has done to their home and yard.

Traversing through the thick wild rose thicket pasture, I arrived at the next stream crossing. This one was going to be tricky as there is usually small pools of barely flowing clear water from a nearby spring, now it was out of its banks and quite muddy. I knew that I would be going way over my boot tops, but with the air temperature at 87 humid degrees I was totally ok with that. Stepping into the water and shuffling slowly forward I was trying to feel the edge of the cut bank, I relaxed at just the wrong moment and allowed my foot to slip into the deep water and down I went. Going down and bowing forward, I had water up to my armpits as I struggled to keep my feet below me and keep my gun and head above water. Popping up out of the bottom towards the far side of the creek, I made it to dry-ish ground. Looking down at my Badlands magnetic binocular harness I saw that phone and Gold rings were completely dry. The camera pouch was a different story however. The Nikon coolpix was fried. I pulled the batteries out and shook out as much water as I could, but in my heart I figured this camera had taken its last photo.

Squeezing as much water out of my socks as I could so I wouldn't squish with each step, I continued forward, dreading the next full sized creek crossing. As I suspected, there was no way to wade across the overflowing stream without swimming, or moving upstream and trespass on private land.

Peering through the treeline, I could see that the agriculture fields that I had hoped to reach were covered with standing water on over 1/2 of their area. The areas that the turkeys had been roosting on would be a big flight to reach from the water's edge. Areas that had been the haunt of hunters and loitering turkeys alike were under 1-2 feet of water. I was going to have to totally change my approach to get my second bird of the season.
 

kansasdad

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Joined
Jul 30, 2011
Messages
3,781
Location
Wichita
Kansas springtime weather can be extremely active, and the TV meteorologists had predicted a very bumpy extended weekend. Friday morning brought hail/wind/heavy rains, and business issues required me to forgo a Friday evening sortie versus the wily Rio Grande turkeys of south central Kansas. I knew that I didn't want to head out anywhere stream crossings would be required in the dark without scouting out the route with full vision so I knew I wasn't going to go early Saturday.

A patient needed an "emergency" visit Saturday morning, and once again the heavens opened in deluge fashion as we were waiting for the adhesive to set. Going home to take care of the dogs, I kept a close eye on the radar, both past and predicted storm tracks. It looked safe to proceed as long as I was out of the field by 8 pm.

Leaving the highway, I could see that there had been lots of rain but the gravel road was fine to drive as well as I kept my speed a little slower than normal. I drove around the Wildlife area a bit, wanting to see what was happening with the high water levels. At a three way stop, I looked over to see a bedraggled coyote standing in the road. The recent rain/high water levels were messing with critters all over the hunting zone.106509



I didn't get to start my usual mantra of "nobody, nobody, nobody" as I approached "my" parking spot, because just off the public/private boundary, I saw a jake jet out of the field and start running down the road. Three other jakes joined him, and they ran down the road for more than a quarter mile ahead of me.

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Turning into the parking lot, I knew that I would have the Wildlife area to myself this afternoon. Getting my pack and gun out of the car, I put together a plan to lure one of these jakes into taking a ride home with me. I was fairly certain that these tasty turkeys would turn right into the trees before they got to the river, and I planned to set up on the field's edge adjacent to the treeline and reel these boys to me. Walking towards the gate from the parking area, I looked down towards the river and saw a dozen turkeys at the end of the field. They hadn't spooked yet with my presence in the parking area as a screen of trees have grown along the fence-line that fully obscured the lot from the feeding birds. For me to approach this flock of feeding birds, I was going to have to crawl over the road fence, cross the road and get down into the borrow ditch on the far side of the road and then slither back across the road and into the public wildlife area, and approach along the watercourse treeline.....or..... take a chance and move through a 20 yard gap in the treeline and get to the hidden trail.

Chancing I could move slowly and remain hidden to 24 eyeballs, I tried the 20 yard gap move. Oooooops! Eleven of the twelve birds were feeding but one bird made me and called out the alarm. At first the flock barely moved, almost as if the sentry wasn't believable. Watching through the binoculars there were multiple legal birds in the flock, and they were getting more nervous with every passing moment. Finally the scramble was on, and the flock exited towards the woods and the river.

I decided to setup near where this flock had been feeding, as I hoped that either I could pull a road jake across the big field, or coax some of the feeding flock back out into the field. I put a hen decoy out just at the treeline edge, and settled down deep into the undergrowth using a cedar as a screen for a road jake, and the stand of poison ivy to screen my position from the feeding flock birds.

Settling in, I waited for thirty minutes before I gently called on my box call. I then might have taken a quick catnap of a few seconds, and then became alert enough again to scan the fields. I had my cellphone out and was texting to Mrs kansasdad who was in Colorado placing her mother's cremains in her final resting place, and texting my children as well. Box call, catnap, box call, catnap, rinse and repeat with a slate call.

I first knew he was coming as I heard some excited clucking. I though it was an alarm "PUTT" call, as they can sound very similar, but the superjake continued coming forward. Peering through the cedar branches, I could see his 5 inch beard and his fiery red head, and I recalled that I had decided that the first legal bird to come in would be mine. I slowly lifted my 12 gauge towards my shoulder, only to find that in my catnapping, my binocular harness had ridden up and over, and totally blocked my ability to shoulder my gun properly. Using the butt of the gun to slide the harness out of the way, I made certain to feel my cheek on the stock, put the bead on the junction of feather/no feather zone on his neck and fired my last shot of spring turkey season.

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In all my years of turkey hunting, I have never had such a short walk back to the car. According to my range finder he dropped 245 yards from my front bumper.


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kansasdad

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 30, 2011
Messages
3,781
Location
Wichita
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I don't remember where I purchased this little piece of silicone rubber, but it is worth its weight in gold. It came in a three pack and was called something like the "silencer three pack". Two tabs on either side for easy grip, the big loop goes over the box of the boxcall, and the little loop goes around the paddle. Now no matter where I store the call in my pack, vest or bellows pockets of my pants, NO MORE INADVERTENT NOISES!!

The call originally came with some janky mechanism inside the box that lifted the paddle up off the rails. I probably broke that little piece of plastic on its third trip into the woods. Usually I would keep an extra sock or my emergency merino beanie stuffed into the box, but sometimes the contents would shift, and I would hear a cluck or yelp (or a danger PUTT) with me moving along trying to be ninja stealthy.

Problem solved and ninja mode engaged.

PS: the box has a significant memento feeling for me, as my parents bought it for me along with a Primos Ol Betsy slate call just as I was getting into turkey hunting. Still my favorite two calls.
 
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