Hunting Knife..

Moosie

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Dec 9, 2000
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Boise, Idaho
What do you think about this knife ?!?!

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Boker Ceramic Blade Knife
Boker's ceramic blades are constructed of zircon-oxide, which is hard as diamonds (so hard it registers beyond the Rockwell scale), resists wear, stays sharp longer than steel and won't rust, stain or discolor. During independent testing of this ceramic for edge-holding ability, the test had to be extended more than three-fold, cutting through 1,300 blocks of testing carton rather than the 400 normally used to test steel blades.
This superbly designed 3-1/8" ceramic locking blade features lightweight titanium sculpted handles that offer a sure grip without adding unnecessary weight. The choice of many outdoorsmen, the drop-point blade is versatile enough to handle a wide range of uses from slicing lunch to skinning big game.
Overall length: 7-1/2".
Overall weight: 3 oz.
 

Moosie

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LOL Tyson, Actually I have a cheap Sharpener that ya hold in your hand and DRAG it once or twice over the Blade.... It works Fine for what I do.

But , NO, I can't sharpen a knife with a "STONE".
 

T Bone

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West Slope, CO
try one of those diamond stones down at Outdoor Outfitters. They make it much easier. Give it to Vic for a special occassion..All gals love diamonds.
 

1_pointer

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Dec 20, 2000
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Indiana
I've got one of those and wouldn't use it as my only knife. Though the blades are hard and stay sharp, they are brittle. You can't use them to pry things or as screw drivers. I've got a few chips in my blade for doing that. Go with steel.
 

JoseCuervo

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Feb 26, 2003
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Moosie,

I heard, and never tested, that the ceramic blades do not take a lateral force, and end up breaking. The way I try and work a blade in close to the horns is just inviting a sideways force. They seem very expensive, for me to risk doing something stupid. I can show you a set up with $4 knives, that is awesome. An old taxidermist showed it to me, and hooked me up with the Butcher Supply shop, for industrial grade poultry knives. They are the best for caping, getting real close to the horns, and I can field dress 4 caribou with one kife, including caping and quartering, and not worry about sharpening. ....

elkgrin.gif
Elkgrinner....
 

Ovis

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Aug 10, 2002
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USA
My opinion...your looking at the wrong knife. Two disadvantages to ceramic knives, 1) Not near as sharp as steel, 2) they are a delicate knife, and if dropped, say on a rock it will shatter.

Take a look at this knife...

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The Double D drop point is the one I have. I purchased the one with the orange handle so that I would have less of a chance of leaving it in the field. Lifetime warranty, and you send it in for sharpening in the off season...when it dulls.

How is this for a line up? Still near as sharp as it was straight out of the box...

2 Brown bear
1 Black bear
2 Mtn Goats
4 deer
1 coyote

I might send it in for a sharpening in the next month or so.

Take a serious look at them. They retail for about $70, and you do have to purchase from a dealer.

Did I mention the rubber handle has a great grip, and won't slip in your hand when wet?

smile.gif
vis
 

BlackTimber

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Jan 23, 2003
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Ut
Yes, you have to send ceramic blades in to be sharpened. Thery will break and chip. That is why I didn't buy one the last time around.
Ovis, what steel is being used on thoes knives?
I had a set of Gerbers at one time (still have them) but the problem was that they were so damn hard (460 stainless)that it took you 45 minutes to get the edge back to a shave.
I bought me a set of "Knives of Alaska" last fall and used them on a buffalo. They held the edge real well and when it was all done I put the shaving edge back on with a hand held stone in about 5 minutes.
They are a high carbon steel so you have to keep them oiled or they will rust. But I hate a dull knife
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so the maintanence is well worth it.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ 03-15-2003 19:53: Message edited by: BlackTimber ]</font>
 

1_pointer

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Cutco DD edges are the sharpest I've ever been around! FWIW, the company that makes Cutco also makes Ka-Bar knives now.
 

danr55

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Dec 18, 2000
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Mesa, AZ
I've got Randall's, Chris Peterson, Todd Kopp, K-Bar, and a whole host of damascus and other knives, but the only one I've used in the field for the last 4 years is a Buck folder, called an Ultralite. For sharpening, I carry a broken half of a ceramic stick in my butt pack. I find that if I stop occassionally and give the blade three or four passes with the ceramic, it stays sharp. I've done two elk in one day using this method and not had a problem.

cool.gif
 

Ovis

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BT

I agree with you on the Gerbers...can't stand em really.

The Cutco blades are of carbon and steel...440A to be exact!

smile.gif
vis
 

muskeg

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Jan 29, 2003
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Waldport, Or
Now-a-days I just use a scalpel handle. It just takes a second to change the blad out. I just bury the used blades. They are very sharp and are very easy to skin and bone meat with. It is also very light for backpacking when every once counts. With a box of blades come a free handle.

You just have to be careful about cutting yourself as a scaple cut won't stop bleeding like a knife cut.

I also carry a suture kit in my packable first aid kit (and in my base camp trauma kit). Just in case there is a Bear attack or bad fall type open wound to deal with while waiting on "the plane, the plane".
 

brokfut

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Dec 31, 2002
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Florida Panhandle
I pack a Buck ultrlite folder in my fanny pack and a Western that is about 40 years old. It takes an edge and will stay sharp for a lot of cutting/skinning. I have a bunch of old ceramic tubes from old abandoned farm building when they wired with "knob and tube". Tubes are the best for keeping my knife sharp.
 

Elkhunter

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Dec 20, 2000
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Jackson, Wyoming
I have a Buck folding that is the only knife I have used since the early 90s. I have a steel and a ceramic for tuning the edge in the field. Only takes seconds.
 

Moosie

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Ovis... SO I need to find a Cutco Dealer ?

Closest one is SLC looks like, I'm sure someone around hear sells them ?
 

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