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Camping in Grizzy country

D_Walt

Active member
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
45
For those of you who frequent grizzly country and set up a truck based camp; do you set up a separate cook tent/area and if so how far do you set up from your sleeping tent? It has been two decades since I camped in the GYE and back then we thought we were tough enough we’d have just eaten a girzzly raw on the spot if one had messed with our camp. Older and less foolish now, will be headed to western WY for a general season elk hunt this fall. Funny enough, it will be the same group of us who camped just north of the park in MT 20 years ago and had no clue about “bear aware”.
 

SD_Prairie_Goat

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 18, 2019
Messages
714
Location
SE SD
If you're cooking something with odor, don't cook it in your sleeping tent. If you have two tents to use, the book would probably say keep it one hundred yards from your sleeping tent, but you could probably get away with less no problem if you needed to. Cache your food, that's a big one.

If you're really worried about it, use Ann electric fence around your tent.
 

Straight Arrow

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Joined
Jun 10, 2009
Messages
3,601
Location
Gallatin Gateway, MT
Hang your food and anything with an odor high up or store it in a bear proof box. Don't allow your sleeping area to smell like elk stroganoff or freshly filleted trout.
 

ccc23454

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 22, 2010
Messages
1,147
Location
Wyoming
Investigate ahead of time wil local district that controls that area. Some places are hard side only camping (n fork) and has to be in campgrounds. Many areas have bear boxes at trailheads and organized sites which is helpful. Lots of places off beaten path you can tent/truck camp but we never do, always a trailer since we dont fence. make the call to that district, some places have known problem bears and FS can advise on best practice. They treat bear storage rules like no joke
 

406dn

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 12, 2019
Messages
441
I camp out of a slide in camper, so slightly different circumstance, but I leave foods like bacon, tuna, sardines, etc at home. Basically, any food with a strong aroma is left for another trip.

I consider it a multifaceted responsibility. That is I want to stay safe, set it up for the next camper to be safe, and to keep bears from learning that campsites are a smorgasbord.

Have a great hunt.
 

2rocky

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2010
Messages
2,268
3 wire electric fence around camp no food in sleeping tents. No meat hung in camp. Usually hung at killsite, and then taken to Trailhead or immediately taken to trailhead.

Edited to add : Bridger Teton National Forest in Wyoming. That was the local ranger's discretion. Other districts may vary.
 
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christopherwatkins

New member
Joined
Apr 10, 2020
Messages
8
It's a dangerous thing to do but I like it so much! The grizzly country is very interesting because there are risks there. I think that's what it does to attract campers. I remember how last year I managed to visit there, and if I didn't get acquainted with https://www.brightcamping.com I couldn't have adapted to that area because I didn't know much about the various facts of the wild back then. Thanks to this guide, I was able to learn camping quickly and interestingly, in addition, I did not fall into the clutches of animals because I was careful and followed all the rules that were told by experienced experts in this field
 
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thomas04

New member
Joined
Oct 21, 2019
Messages
10
For those of you who frequent grizzly country and set up a truck based camp; do you set up a separate cook tent/area and if so how far do you set up from your sleeping tent? It has been two decades since I camped in the GYE and back then we thought we were tough enough we’d have just eaten a girzzly raw on the spot if one had messed with our camp. Older and less foolish now, will be headed to western WY for a general season elk hunt this fall. Funny enough, it will be the same group of us who camped just north of the park in MT 20 years ago and had no clue about “bear aware”.
Yeah, it can be dangerous, of course.. but if you know what to take with you in such camping/travelling and how to react in different situations - then it would be okay. Every time I want to go camping I prefer to visit 99 Camping blog, cause it's maybe the only place on the web where real experts of this sphere can explain you all then necessary and truly practical tips and tricks, which you should follow during such camping. It also has plenty of comparison articles, where different camping stuff is being compared with another models, showing you all the pros and cons they have.
 
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