Aggression?

James Riley

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I just talked to a guy who's going up Humbolt Peak tomorrow and I asked him if there were goats up there. He said yes. In the course of the conversation he said they can be aggressive. I was surprised. Later he qualified it, as when they feel threatened. I was just wondering what you people thought of this? Have you ever head of them being aggressive, as in more so than, say, deer, elk, big horns or other split hooves? Just curious.
 

HalfAce

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I dont remember all the details, but a few years ago a goat killed a hiker in Washington state. I thought it was a joke, but i dont know that much about them either.
 

Randy11

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I buy it, they're ornery SOB's. Even the nannies can't stand each other and are always posturing, kicking, and jabbing at each other.

In Chadwick's book he talks about an 'orb' around a goats head, and anytime two goats orbs come in contact there's going to be a kerfluffle. I have no doubt if a human found it's way in to that orb there'd be a dust up as well.
 

Ben Long

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All wildlife deserves respect. Chadwick took a horn, as I recall, getting too close to a goat. They can get very addicted to human salt from urine and sweaty clothes. They will defend that. I have a friend who was "treed" on a boulder by an aggressive, food-conditioned goat. That said, I have shared very close quarters with goats many times in the Olympics, Glacier Park, the Swans and the Clearwater. The only time I was concerned was when a mother with a kid climbed a peak that I was descending -- with my dog in tow. My dog as on a leash, but the nanny's posture was clear that she was happy to stick a horn up my dog's butt, and maybe mine (since I was tied to the dog.) I spoke softly, worked as wide a path as could in the terrain, and all ended OK.
 

Ben Long

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LopeHunter, my wife and I once watched, via a spotting scope, a big solo griz (22 year old female, without cubs) share an alpine slope with a herd of goats. I thought things might get western when they fed into each others' space. Eventually they did, the griz realized she was near the goats, then she took off and ran over the top of the mountain. Wild animals do wild things, indeed. (The bear had an ear tag and I was able to identity her through the biologist who had tagged her.)
 

James Riley

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Thanks for the feedback. Interesting. I had no idea. I understand the concept of any animal, including deer etc. deserving of respect, but it was interesting to hear goats are a notch up on that scale. I wonder if it has something to do with being at the top with nowhere else to go without wings :D They are already half cornered by being up there and they probably don't expect a whole lot of riff raff in the neighborhood. I know when I work hard for a place to be alone it can be a let down to find others there. In any event, next time I see them I won't necessarily expect them to run. :eek:
 

Nameless Range

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I can attest to the aggressiveness of goats.

Years back, while camping at the Ridell Lakes in the Mission Mountains, goats were following us around, and when you did take a piss, it was like throwing a ribeye to a pack of hungry dogs.

Then again, I've played the role of the stupid tourist as well.....

This was The Hidden Lake Trail at Logan Pass.
 

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Tanner

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High Country CO
I've seen a big billy beat the piss out of a nanny when she tried stepping around him in a single file line traversing a saddle in the Gore Range. It was pretty wild!

Tanner
 

psinclair

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NE Montana...also known as "Little Siberia".
LopeHunter, my wife and I once watched, via a spotting scope, a big solo griz (22 year old female, without cubs) share an alpine slope with a herd of goats. I thought things might get western when they fed into each others' space. Eventually they did, the griz realized she was near the goats, then she took off and ran over the top of the mountain. Wild animals do wild things, indeed. (The bear had an ear tag and I was able to identity her through the biologist who had tagged her.)

I may need to market, "Goat Spray".....

I saw the exact opposite a few years back in the AB. I watched a mature boar grizzly put the run a lone billy, chasing him all the way over the top of a cliff ridden peak over 10,000 elevation. There was a time or two it almost caught it....one of the coolest things I've ever seen through a spotting scope..
 

BigHornRam

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I may need to market, "Goat Spray".....

I saw the exact opposite a few years back in the AB. I watched a mature boar grizzly put the run a lone billy, chasing him all the way over the top of a cliff ridden peak over 10,000 elevation. There was a time or two it almost caught it....one of the coolest things I've ever seen through a spotting scope..

You get to see some neat things hunting over the years through a spotting scope.

I watched a couple wolves chase some goats on top of a 10,000 foot flat top mountain in the AB.

In Canada, I watch a young billy walk up to two young rams and bed down with them for the mid day siesta. He must have thought he was a sheep.
 

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