Wild Game gaining popularity/acceptance?

R.K.

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Just ran across this series that was posted on an Anthony Bourdain fan page- it's not Bourdain, but another well-known food personality- albeit he's given up his usual gimmick of eating whatever nasties he comes across.

"Andrew Zimmern's Wild Game Kitchen"


I'm not sure how much of this is pandering, but the man can cook. This is elk (episode 6), but he starts the series off with bison and trout, and also does rabbit.

And now I can't help but wonder if this is a result of Joe Rogan and other celebrities taking up hunting. We've known for years how good this stuff is, but could this be part of a bigger movement (or possible advertising campaign) to grow the acceptance of hunting? And if so- what are the consequences of it? More advocates is great, but what effect would more hunters have on the current resources?

All that to say- food looks good and I might have to try making some of it.
 

LuketheDog

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When my daughter was an infant and not sleeping I'd often watch Bizarre Foods reruns in the middle of the night, I bet that guy has eaten more varieties of wild game than most people on the planet. He's pretty entertaining.
 

SnowyMountaineer

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I always liked watching that guy. I wonder if it would be as likely to grow acceptance of farmed game. You can go to the store and pay for bison, trout, elk, etc. if you have the budget.
 

R.K.

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Seems like this specific example is more geared towards folks asking for it at restaurants and or the super market, which means more Elk, Bison, etc behind high wire and treated as livestock which I think net-net is bad.
Agreed. But I could get behind rabbit getting more common. Absolutely love rabbit.
 

JShane

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Just ran across this series that was posted on an Anthony Bourdain fan page- it's not Bourdain, but another well-known food personality- albeit he's given up his usual gimmick of eating whatever nasties he comes across.

"Andrew Zimmern's Wild Game Kitchen"


I'm not sure how much of this is pandering, but the man can cook. This is elk (episode 6), but he starts the series off with bison and trout, and also does rabbit.

And now I can't help but wonder if this is a result of Joe Rogan and other celebrities taking up hunting. We've known for years how good this stuff is, but could this be part of a bigger movement (or possible advertising campaign) to grow the acceptance of hunting? And if so- what are the consequences of it? More advocates is great, but what effect would more hunters have on the current resources?

All that to say- food looks good and I might have to try making some of it.
Pretty sure at some point your question will tumble into a point creep derail. Having said that I do like Andrew Zimmern. Thanks for the link I'll be checking out these episodes.
 

Boarmaster

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Its my experience that most people turn their nose up at wild game. The reasons are many but mostly if they did try it it wasnt cooked properly or cared for after the kill.
I deer hunt with several guys currently and quite a few over the years that dont eat whitetail. A lot of guys depend on their wives to cook for them and the excuse is that the wife wont cook it or eat it. They kill deer and give them away.
 

CycleFishHunt

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Your post title should say “re-gaining” acceptance.

Cookbooks used to routinely have game recipes in them. I’m pretty sure the Joy of Cooking edition my mom had when I was growing up had squirrel.

If you flip though old cookbooks at your grandparents or in a thrift store you’ll see game recipes.
 

R.K.

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Your post title should say “re-gaining” acceptance.

Cookbooks used to routinely have game recipes in them. I’m pretty sure the Joy of Cooking edition my mom had when I was growing up had squirrel.

If you flip though old cookbooks at your grandparents or in a thrift store you’ll see game recipes.
That's its own rabbit hole. Predominantly because pre-World war 2, 65% of Americans lived in a rural setting, whereas it's now closer to 40%, possibly less. Wild game used to be the norm, but the post-war years saw that fade into obscurity as people left the farms, moved to cities, and our food supply became industrialized and homogenized.
 

bucdoego

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Popularity increase? Maybe so. Farms for wild game herds? Not a big fan. New hunters and more acceptance of wild game as table fare? I'm all for it.

I've learned to cook a few venison recipes over the past decade that are pretty tasty, IMAO anyway. Enough so that my GF has been known to lick the plate clean at the end of a dinner (when no one but me is there to witness, of course).

Together we introduced venison to many of her skeptical, reluctant relative families and friends with great success. It is gratifying to see someone, who was sure that they didn't/wouldn't like it, decide to "try a bite" once their children had happily devoured several helpings. These reluctant adults then proceeded to eat generous portions and share their thoughts as to the surprise that it was not only okay, but very tasty. Not the objectionable taste or experience they had expected. I now count them in the "convert" column!

Game meat, treated properly from field to table is really the key. I've been served ill-prepared venison and not liked it (many of you have probably experienced this too). Those experiences led me to learn more, so as not to do the same for guests at my table. I like to hunt, butcher my own game and cook as well. Sharing it with others is simply another experience in friendship.

With the way the world is moving, we should all be developing our extended group of reliable friends and associates related to food production, etc. The way I look at it, I might get a packer or two out of this group yet. If they'll eat it, they might even hunt it.
 

bucdoego

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Agreed. But I could get behind rabbit getting more common. Absolutely love rabbit.
I haven't seen it on a menu at a restaurant, but then, I haven't been in as many restaurants as I was pre-COVID (find with me) either. I'm told some butchers have rabbit meat available and that, in some states, it can be bought at a farmer's market (or similar) from local growers. In any event, I intend to buy it and try it. I've liked wild rabbit when I've had it in the distant past.

There are families that raise rabbit as part of their food source. It can be done in many semi-urban neighborhoods - it doesn't require a "farm" to succeed. They can be raised along with chickens to add variety. With where the world is headed, you might notice some neighbors are doing so already.
 
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PrairieHunter

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The truth is less and less people are eating wild game. I have friend who guide and hunters care about getting the rack home, most do not care about the meat and just donate it.

We need more doe, rabbit, etc hunters who do so for meat and do not care about the horns or social media posts.

The % of wild game meat from animals killed by hunters that is actually utilized by humans is likely quite small between the #of animals wasted not finding them, amount of meat wasted from getting warm, shot placement, not knowing how to process, or getting left in the freezer for years.

IF you took out the donated meat from that total and just used the amount of meat eaten by the person or family who killed the animal it has to be really low.

That's why people are always trying to give away wild game but you won't find them handing out beef steaks, lol.
 

bucdoego

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Just ran across this series that was posted on an Anthony Bourdain fan page- it's not Bourdain, but another well-known food personality- albeit he's given up his usual gimmick of eating whatever nasties he comes across.

"Andrew Zimmern's Wild Game Kitchen"

I'm not sure how much of this is pandering, but the man can cook. This is elk (episode 6), but he starts the series off with bison and trout, and also does rabbit.

All that to say- food looks good and I might have to try making some of it.
Thanks for the reference. I'm going to check this out too.
 

bucdoego

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The truth is less and less people are eating wild game. I have friend who guide and hunters care about getting the rack home, most do not care about the meat and just donate it.

That's why people are always trying to give away wild game but you won't find them handing out beef steaks, lol.
One of my neighbors shot an Elk and a Muley in Colorado this year. I like him more now than before he went on his "bucket-list" hunt. Did I mention that he filled my empty freezer with the meat? He filled his freezer first, but I'm not complaining.'-)

Seriously, as long as the meat isn't wasted, I'm good with the hunters that don't consume it for themselves and their families.
 

bucdoego

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Scary isn't it? Probably the same people who are watching Dr Phil and Judge Judy. Eeyuuch!
I certainly don't agree with everything he says and does. I like that he steps up (well, mostly) and says what he thinks though. Silencing those we don't agree with isn't the right way forward. Besides, a good argument can be entertaining! '-)

I don't "know" Rogan and I don't subscribe to Spotify, etc. either. So, my exposure to him is in small samples. Dr. Phil and Judge Judy aren't on my viewing list either. Neither interests me. I suspect that their followings are significantly smaller than Rogan's, but they are of a different generation too.

They are all "media personas", so I take their opinions with a heavy does of skepticism. There's a great George Carlin quote to similar effect.
 
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