Necessary gear for first western hunt.

steveshuntn1

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Sep 23, 2021
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I will join @LuketheDog and @Wallydeuce in trying to steer you away from wearing cotton anything.
I’ll be looking at all our whitetail clothing and seeing what we can use and we can’t. We both are hot natured and sweat when it’s 20 degrees here, but it’s humid in MS at 20! Good socks and drawers will be high on the list! My daughter is messaging some ladies who western hunt and have YouTube channels for advice as well. One has been very helpful with tips Outdoors With Allie!
 

Don Fischer

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Jun 27, 2017
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Exactly…you can go in a deep hole buying gear! My Dad and Uncle hunted deer in wrangler jeans and flannel shirts. Killed a lot of deer!
I have done a lot of hunting In jeans and a flannel shirt and pair of tennis shoes! Last time I was deer hunting was a decent number of years ago and we had really nice weather, Brought the flannel shirt along but hunted in a T-shirt. be hard to tell someone else what to wear, I don't outfit myself all that well. In snow and rain I trade the tennis shoes in for boots. Don't have to be expensive. pair I have now I seldom wear and fere under $50 some years back at Bi Mart. Fitted them with a set of after market liner's in the bottom and guess i just live with them. I have hunted some in my old Carheart coat but don't like that heavy a coat if I'm walking around a lot. Most likely the same stuff you wear at home for hunting will work fine. Take along a heavy and a light flannel shirt and double up if need be. Might be nice to have a pair of long john's for under your jeans just in case.
 

Redman

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Camofire has deals on merino wool clothing from Black Ovis and it is pretty good. I prefer wool vs synthetic. Synthetic tends get stinking quickly and gets worse as time goes during the trip. Merino seems to resist getting as rank. Merino will also keep you warm when wet. Again NO COTTON! Layering is key to comfort and knowing when to add or subtract clothing will keep you comfortable and if you're comfortable you are going to stay out longer. I have gotten in a hurry and waited to long to adjust my layers and waisted time and energy warming up or drying out due to sweating. Don't ignore hot spots on your feet take care of it as soon as you feel it.
 

Shortbowshot

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Jan 28, 2021
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Boots, Boots ,Boots. In that order.
If you want to kill pressured elk get up earlier and walk farther than anyone else. Good Glass is great, if you can afford it. But 3 mile elk are just that if you can't reach them. Good luck!!
 

Thegreatwapiti

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Jun 29, 2021
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I know you mentioned a satellite communication device and I saw that one person mentioned a compass, but I don't go in the woods/forests/mountains without my Garmin GPS and spare batteries. To me, nothing else matters. Cell-based apps are unreliable IMO. Wet feet, cold weather, swampass, bad food, or whatever. If I get lost and die in the mountains, I'm still dead.
 

C_Dick_Run

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Dec 4, 2016
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Laurel, Montana
Boots are at the top of the list for me. After that make sure you have a good base layering system. As far as camo, I would just use whatever you already have. A decent spotting scope is nice to have but you probably won't want to carry it around all day.
 

manitou1

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Oct 29, 2017
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Wyoming
In addition to glass and tripod, boots, rain gear and merino base layers I would definitely have ONX. Zoleo for emergencies and comm. You won't need a GPS if you have ONX and a phone.
A packable puffy also.
A sitting/glassing pad is nice.
Water bottles. Can be as simple as used gatorade bottles. nalgene or bladder.
Fire starter.
FIRST AIDE KIT! Include a tournequet and qwikclot, liquid bandaid or crazy glue, tenacious tape, pain meds.
Trekking poles are a great help.
Headlamp and spare.
Battery pack for cell phone.
-- Black Ovis merino is a good recommendation for the $$$. I use a LOT of it.
-- Practice shooting off your pack and tripod.
-- No brainers: Sleep/camp gear, knives, sharpener, game bags, snacks and food. Coolers in the truck.
-- Research good lightweight clothing systems: Merino base, polarfleece, grid fleece or the like mid layer or outer layer when warmer (a lightweight and a mid/heavy weight). Rain gear for wind or rain protection and a puffy should keep you out there.
Elk Tag!
 

Nicoli7153

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Sep 9, 2021
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FWIW I had a Garmin Mini In Reach and found it to be pretty clunky to use. Got a Zoleo and like it much better! Couple of guys I hunt with had Garmins and are switching to Zoleo after they saw how mine worked.
 
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Scott85

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Nov 22, 2018
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FWIW I had a Garnin Mini In Reach and found it to be pretty clunky to use. Got a Zoleo and like it much better! Couple of guys I hunt with had Garmins and are switching to Zoleo after they saw how mine worked.
Did you have the app with your phone for the Garmin?
 

brownbear932008

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Jul 15, 2011
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SWVA
Exactly…you can go in a deep hole buying gear! My Dad and Uncle hunted deer in wrangler jeans and flannel shirts. Killed a lot of deer!
You need much less than gear nuts let on. Sounds like you pretty much have your bases covered for the basics. A good sleeping bag and cot with some foam padding will help you get a good night's sleep. Always carry some fire starting material and some safety precautions the West can be brutal at times.
 
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Alpine01

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Jun 23, 2019
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Colorado
I’m with WNC above, get a solid set of binos that will accept a stud for a tripod and then a tripod with a good head. That won’t set you back nearly as much as a quality spotter would and you can use it in most scenarios. He also mentioned 15’s which you would definitely need the tripod for anyway.

You said truck camp so food may not be as big of a deal. If you are going to do any of the freeze dried stuff then try it out at home first, some will jack you up or just taste bad. I also had to play around with a jet boil to know how to use it correctly.
Agree on trying them at home first. Beef Mac n cheese flat laid me out during a three day scouting trip because I didn’t try it at home before going out. Huge mistake and one I will never make again.
 
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