Hunter recruitment is why are WY resident draw odds getting worse for antelope

SaskHunter

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Interesting. Describes me perfectly. Hunting about 10 years now. Started with deer, then deer and elk, and the past 5 years I added antelope. Not in WY. Antelope weren't even on my radar. I decided to try it one year. My family and I really enjoyed the meat so I kept applying.

On the other hand, I believe a lot of people apply in Wyoming for antelope. They get there and realize this whole western hunting thing is pretty accessible and next thing you know, you go from applying for antelope tags in Wyoming to building points/applying for antelope, elk and deer in 8 western states. That's me, I had always dreamed of hunting antelope, I did it and realized how "easy" the whole process was so now I'm applying everywhere that fits my budget. I have a good paying job, lots of time off and a supporting wife.
 

JLS

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States are hip to that circumvented approach. That’s why residency requires a minimum amount of days(near 180). Although it’s not heavily enforced yet. But never underestimate a state’s department of revenue to close such loopholes.
Actually, residency requirements have been in effect for ages and are put into place to keep someone from a different state from getting a PO Box and driver license so they could purchase tags and enter draws as a resident. Many of the western states have actively enforced this for decades. Dept of Revenue typically. has nothing to so with hunting license residency requirements and enforcement.
 

wllm1313

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States are hip to that circumvented approach. That’s why residency requires a minimum amount of days(near 180). Although it’s not heavily enforced yet. But never underestimate a state’s department of revenue to close such loopholes. Then there are potential insurance issues if you get in a car accident. The best work around would be to own a home in 3 or 4 states. But how many can afford that? So those types are playing a potentially costly game. But once you own a home you pay county taxes on, should you not be able to have a right to hunt? Some debatable
issues with some grey areas. This post is kinda neither here nor there, but prairie hunter got me to thinking 🤔 such. Ultimately I don’t think these types applying for hunting licenses affects the issue too much.
What are you taking about? You clearly don’t read the regulations or understand how anything works.

What’s debatable have you read the rules?
 
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wllm1313

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Actually, residency requirements have been in effect for ages and are put into place to keep someone from a different state from getting a PO Box and driver license so they could purchase tags and enter draws as a resident. Many of the western states have actively enforced this for decades. Dept of Revenue typically. has nothing to so with hunting license residency requirements and enforcement.
Not to mention that virtually all states have a hunting statute that stipulates that as part of claiming residency you cannot hold a resident hunting license in another state.

To be a resident for hunting purposes in every western state you must;

1. rent or own a home
2. Have vehicle licensed and titled in that state
3. Have a drivers license
4. Pay taxes as a resident
5. Be registered to vote in that state
6. Hold no other resident licenses
7. Reside for a number a days prior to buying your first resident license.

The idea that you could buy a condo and legally apply as a resident is ridiculous.
 
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Maybe you're right...perhaps I should scrap any notion of averages and just assume that any new population growth will be recruited into hunting at 1300% of the previous rate. It is possible that it's not really recruitment, but actually participation. Maybe some of the folks that used to apply every other year decided to start applying every year. It's also possible that folks that used to be able to pick up over the counter tags for their area can't because of the NR rollover now and have to apply during the regular draw. The bottom line is that statistically the idea that either population growth or tag reductions have been a primary driver for the decreased draw odds is not really tenable (although there's always a chance :)).
I have noticed that over the last several years, tag numbers have decreased in the areas I put in for. That can’t help your odds.
 

Mattff200

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Mar 1, 2019
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Why is it new hunter recruitment?

565K in 2010 to about 582K in 2020 so +20K
26K to 38K + 12K

So 60% of people who moved to WY in the last year hunt.

If I wanted to move somewhere that had good food, great music scene and sports I'd move to New York/Chicago/Houston/etc etc. If I wanted to shoot critters I'd move to WY.

How is this not just a bunch of 25-65 year old folks from the midwest moving to WY specifically for residency status so they can have better draw odds.

What is the actual data point that says any of these are adult onset hunters?
I'm one of those people 25-65 that moved to Wyoming and a bug reason was that hunting perks of being a resident. That is on top of the financial perks and just living the freedom you have living here. By the way I do get 3 a telope tags per year.
 

WyoDoug

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I'm one of those people 25-65 that moved to Wyoming and a bug reason was that hunting perks of being a resident. That is on top of the financial perks and just living the freedom you have living here. By the way I do get 3 a telope tags per year.
Only three??? I usually add one or more leftovers to mine each year.
 

bullbugle307

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Maybe you're right...perhaps I should scrap any notion of averages and just assume that any new population growth will be recruited into hunting at 1300% of the previous rate. It is possible that it's not really recruitment, but actually participation. Maybe some of the folks that used to apply every other year decided to start applying every year. It's also possible that folks that used to be able to pick up over the counter tags for their area can't because of the NR rollover now and have to apply during the regular draw. The bottom line is that statistically the idea that either population growth or tag reductions have been a primary driver for the decreased draw odds is not really tenable (although there's always a chance :)).
I don't know how much it accounts for, but I know a fair number of half serious hunters that used to always wait until well after the draw and then right before season they'd buy general and leftover tags. They're all applying now, even if it's just for those cow elk or doe pronghorn tags they used to get leftover.
 

Cornell Cowboy

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Laramie, WY
I don't know how much it accounts for, but I know a fair number of half serious hunters that used to always wait until well after the draw and then right before season they'd buy general and leftover tags. They're all applying now, even if it's just for those cow elk or doe pronghorn tags they used to get leftover.
I'm certainly in that boat!
 

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