Elk Daypack for Archery

Mully204

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Jul 16, 2018
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38
Need some advice on best Daypack for Archery.
I like the idea of something modular that can have different sized packs attached to it. I'll be doing bigger trips in the future so scaling up to a larger pack, or even down to just a frame would be great.
Other features I would Like:
-bow carrier on pack with quick release (i like the look of Eberlestock's quick release so you don't have to take the pack off your back)
-Meat carrying ability (i like exo mountain for the ability to carry right against the frame and keep weight close).

Let me know your thoughts, and any key features to look for.
Thanks,
Mark
 
Joined
Jun 25, 2018
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Location
Colorado
I would invest in one of the big three: Kifaru, Exo, or Mystery Ranch. I'd get a bag in the 3500 - 5000 cubic inches range. These packs can be both day packs and multi day packs. They will all have great meat carrying ability. As far as a bow carrier, I have never used one on my pack so can't give advise there. I run a Kifaru, but have buddies who use the other two companies packs and they enjoy theirs. Good luck picking one out.
 

Redside

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Jul 13, 2016
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Don't forget to look at Stone Glacier. I have been using the solo 3300 the past few years and it is great. Not too big for a day pack and still works fine for a 3ish day trip. I've packed out a few elk with it and it feels as good as 80-100lbs will feel on your back. I'm not sure if they have the bow quick release carrier, I just strap to the pack otherwise I'm just carrying my bow most of the time.
 

MinnesotaHunter

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Gem Lake, Minnesota
If you are open to some feedback. You number 1 priority should be how well it packs meat. Don't buy into gimmicky stuff and sacrifice load hauling "comfort". Mystery Ranch, Stone Glacier, EXO, Kifaru are all good option and most have the ability to carry meat between the frame and bag.

They idea of a quick draw bow holder is kind of a pipe dream. If you think you are in the vicinity of elk, get it off your pack. If you bump into an elk with your bow on the pack no bow holster is going to help you. If you want to be able to creep "hands free" look at some of the bow slings available.

My experience owning an Eberlestock is that they are not in the same league as the brands listed above. I switch to a MR after using a J107 for years, and I was amazed how much better the MR handled a load. YMMV.
 

WapitiBob

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Oct 20, 2004
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Bend, Orygun
I just switched to Stone Glacier; integrated meat shelf and all bags clip right to the frame. I put their 900ci access bag on mine for day hunts. Weighs 6.9# with kill kit w/bags, extras, and safety/hygiene, minus water. The new Kifaru is a good one too.
 

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Redman

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Mar 31, 2017
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Indiana
Outdoorsmans mule, then if you want to add a bigger pack later you can. Or in the off season you can add the Atlas trainer.
 

GearJunky

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Aug 7, 2014
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If a budget is concerned, I wouldn't look past the Kuiu packs. I have had an 1850 pro for several years and it does everything and more for me. I have a bad shoulder, that can give me issues and I have always been able to adjust my kuiu pack to keep it happy. They also have several options for weapon carrying. It doesn't appear to be as well built as the other ones mentioned (smaller attachment straps), but many miles and several elk later I have yet to have one issue with mine.

Also as a day pack, I have never needed more than 1850 cubic inches... I often wonder why I have so much empty space!
 

wllm1313

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Dec 9, 2015
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Aurora, CO
I just switched to Stone Glacier; integrated meat shelf and all bags clip right to the frame. I put their 900ci access bag on mine for day hunts. Weighs 6.9# with kill kit w/bags, extras, and safety/hygiene, minus water. The new Kifaru is a good one too.
I can't believe I have never thought to setup mine this way...especially on load number 2
 

WapitiBob

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Bend, Orygun
I set my kifaru up basically the same way; a side zip long pocket (750ci) across the btm and then for a "bag" I used the gen2 hanging meat bag. The side zip held everything I needed for day hunt and working up/packing out an animal and mid morning would stuff the jacket in the gen2.
 

oldillini

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Nov 18, 2014
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Western Indiana
If a budget is concerned, I wouldn't look past the Kuiu packs. I have had an 1850 pro for several years and it does everything and more for me. I have a bad shoulder, that can give me issues and I have always been able to adjust my kuiu pack to keep it happy. They also have several options for weapon carrying. It doesn't appear to be as well built as the other ones mentioned (smaller attachment straps), but many miles and several elk later I have yet to have one issue with mine.

Also as a day pack, I have never needed more than 1850 cubic inches... I often wonder why I have so much empty space!
I too run the Kuiu Pro. I have the 5200 and 1850 packs, but have yet to test the 1850. I can say that the 5200 will work as a day pack, but not optimum. It is much better suited for those multiday hunts and that's what I have used it on. Here in the Hoosier state there isn't often that I need a good day pack. Doesn't take much to carry 10# of stuff 1/4 mile into your stand. I do plan to take the 1850 on an antelope hunt in MT late August.
 

7Bartman

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Jan 7, 2018
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Maryland
I've taken a different approach. I got a Alps Outdoorz packframe for ~ $125 for meat hauling. I trained with ~ 65lbs of dumbbells in it last summer and it handled fine. For a 'day pack' I use Cabela's Elite Scout Pack. Importantly, the scout pack is light weight and doesn't sit directly on my back so I don't get sweaty. Also, I can strap my bow to it as well as my pistol. It'll handle both backstraps or a front quarter if I need to get it out on the first trip. On the second trip I'll bring my packframe to get the heavy stuff.
I personally don't like having a larger pack on my back all day.
 

Fire_9

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Mar 25, 2015
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502
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Lewistown, MT
I would get out of the ‘daypack’ mindset. A lot of the bigger packs will suck down to daypack size when they’re empty. I used to carry a dedicated daypack but now I use my stone glacier 7200 for everything. I don’t bother switching between bags that way my backpack is always ready to go.
 

Mully204

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Jul 16, 2018
Messages
38
I just switched to Stone Glacier; integrated meat shelf and all bags clip right to the frame. I put their 900ci access bag on mine for day hunts. Weighs 6.9# with kill kit w/bags, extras, and safety/hygiene, minus water. The new Kifaru is a good one too.
Thanks for the photo WapitiBob! I like the modular ability of this setup.
 

Mully204

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Jul 16, 2018
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Thanks everyone! I felt like i had researched backpacks to the finish, but now i have a lot of research ahead of me to make a decision. Right now i'm liking the Kifaru, Exo, and Stone glacier.
Definately have to look more into Mystery Ranch, Kuiu, seek outside, and the Outdoorsmans system with the preseason atlas trainer looks pretty cool.
I'd prefer to buy once, and buy right, so thanks for the experience and input. Its impressive how many packs some people have tried out.
 

Mully204

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Joined
Jul 16, 2018
Messages
38
If you are open to some feedback. You number 1 priority should be how well it packs meat. Don't buy into gimmicky stuff and sacrifice load hauling "comfort". Mystery Ranch, Stone Glacier, EXO, Kifaru are all good option and most have the ability to carry meat between the frame and bag.

They idea of a quick draw bow holder is kind of a pipe dream. If you think you are in the vicinity of elk, get it off your pack. If you bump into an elk with your bow on the pack no bow holster is going to help you. If you want to be able to creep "hands free" look at some of the bow slings available.

My experience owning an Eberlestock is that they are not in the same league as the brands listed above. I switch to a MR after using a J107 for years, and I was amazed how much better the MR handled a load. YMMV.
Thanks Minnesota! Appreciate the input on Eberlestock. I tried on a few of their packs in Cabelas, and they felt pretty good. (looking at the X1A3). Their marketing seems a bit rough, watching videos etc isn't nearly as good as the EXO product info videos. I've got a few more brands to research now too. I'm definitely open to advice, and in this case i think i'll stay away from Eberlestock and try to buy the right pack the first time.
The idea with the quick release is that it could increase odds a tiny bit, that one time in a million when you bump an animal and getting the bow in your hands in 2 seconds vs 10 seconds could make the difference. (a bit paranoid ever since a bad muzzleloading experience last fall when i needed another 2 seconds after bumping a big whitetail i didn't expect) I tried it in the system in the store and it seemed pretty secure, but its not worth sacrificing the main purpose of the pack (gear and meat hauling), that i will spend 99% of the time using the pack for. I'd prefer to carry my bow all the time, but I'm planning to mountain bike into spots this fall.
Thanks for the input!
 

Mully204

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Joined
Jul 16, 2018
Messages
38
I would get out of the ‘daypack’ mindset. A lot of the bigger packs will suck down to daypack size when they’re empty. I used to carry a dedicated daypack but now I use my stone glacier 7200 for everything. I don’t bother switching between bags that way my backpack is always ready to go.
Hey Fire 9
I think that is good advice, I heard similar advice from people who have bought a lot of packs in all different sizes. They pointed me in the modular pack direction, so I could use attachments to get up to the 7200 ci ballpark, or down to a smaller size. Same idea as what you said. Seems like cabelas locally only has so many packs, and its nice to try them out to see how big/how small they can actually compress down to. So its making the buying process a bit tricky for me. Fortunately there are a few good review videos out there for the major brands.
 
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