Axle to Axle Advantages?

@sclancy27 that was a well thought out post - i appreciate that a ton!
Your right - i know I have worked on back tension and surprising myself with the release but know that there is some torque in the bow - sometimes more than others. I noticed when I was shooting with my thin gloves on and when it was cold the torque is greater.
I don't know if this is a loss of 'connection' or just a lack of routine because things are off slightly. I need to do more outdoor archery shooting as daylight permits and try to get some shots in.
I will need to look into options to upgrade the grip on my bow and I plan to shoot with the liner gloves from now on
 
@sclancy27 that was a well thought out post - i appreciate that a ton!
Your right - i know I have worked on back tension and surprising myself with the release but know that there is some torque in the bow - sometimes more than others. I noticed when I was shooting with my thin gloves on and when it was cold the torque is greater.
I don't know if this is a loss of 'connection' or just a lack of routine because things are off slightly. I need to do more outdoor archery shooting as daylight permits and try to get some shots in.
I will need to look into options to upgrade the grip on my bow and I plan to shoot with the liner gloves from now on
Yup. Just remember that you are only as good as your worst shots in archery, those tend to be the ones displayed in the heat of the moment. If you can get to the point that those "worst shots" are still pretty good....well, then you got it figured.
 
Yup. Just remember that you are only as good as your worst shots in archery, those tend to be the ones displayed in the heat of the moment. If you can get to the point that those "worst shots" are still pretty good....well, then you got it figured.
I like that explanation - and I guess that is what has me considering the upgrade.
 
Longer bows will reduce the L/R deflection of the cams at string release for a given amount of bowhand torque. They also change the string angle which can help develop a more repeatable anchor if you have a long draw.

All that said... until you're a good enough shot that you know you need the longer bow, it probably isn't going to make enough difference to tell. Make yourself good enough that the bow is the limiting factor, and suddenly you will have a lot of insight about what YOU need in a bow.


Or just go get the longer ATA, they look cooler :cool:.
 
I think unless you hunt ground blinds exclusively there's no reason to go to a real short ata bow. I shot a 30" ata bowtech assassin for many years and it was fine. I now shoot a 33" ata bowtech sr350 and i enjoy shooting it more. I cant say it's technically more accurate or whatever but I shoot it better, I like the less steep angle for the peep from my eye. And it does seem more stable to me.

Another thing to consider. Not all bows are the same! My 33" sr350 is the same size approximately as mathews 29" ata phase 4. Their riser design was so much longer and bigger holding the bows side by side, they were about the same size. Mathews 33" was like an Indian longbow.

I also hunted alot from my saddle this year with my bow and the extra couple inches of ata made zero difference in maneuverability.
 
I shot the phase 4 in both 29" and 33". Ended up buying the 33", because the 29" felt like a cannon going off in my hand and was noticeably louder. I am a Midwestern tree stand hunter 90% of the time and have never thought damn wish my bow was shorter.
Something was seriously messed up with that 29 if it was loud and felt like a canon. I’ve shot a couple of them and found them super quiet and smooth. My wife thought the same and bought one

I’ve owned bows from 32 inch up to 37. Currently a Mathews v3x 33. String angle is a bit part of fit and with the giant cams and long risers on lots of new bows you can probably get similar fit with something new and shorter as what you used to shoot 15-20 years ago that was longer.
 
"Cannon" was maybe a slight exaggeration. However, very noticeable difference between the 29 and the 33. Simple physics and geometry. You have a shorter travel getting to a faster speed (edit: and getting to the same draw weight in a quicker time thus making it a more "harsh" draw cycle) Going to cause more noise and handshock.

Like I said very noticeable, shot two arrows through the 29 and said nope not for me. 33 is a smoother draw cycle, less aggressive draw, and more dead in hand. Mathews will even tell you that.
 
The 29" mathews has a higher IBO speed. It's not just the ata length difference, they made the cams themselves harsher to pick up about 10 fps more over the 33 inch model, the stiffer draw cycle probably has more to do with that than Ata length. Bowtech is making 28" bows extremely smooth but lower ibo
 
I recommend going to a range that will let you shoot different lengths to make your comparison. You'll likely find very little difference.

How the bow is setup and technique has a lot to do with accuracy. I'd say it is more than axle to axle length.
 
You can’t look at the ATA as an independent variable. There are many thing that factor into what makes a bow “ forgiving “. And quite frankly even that term is pretty useless
 
Long A to A and forgiving brace height make for a great bow. Ya, new technolgy makes it easier to shoot short A to A bows with stupid brace heights. But the old rule still applies.
 
Well for better or worse I bought a new bow and I'm going to gift my old one to my buddy who is trying to get into Archery. He is a very successful rifle hunter for Mule Deer and wants to up the challenge.
 
"Well for better or worse I bought a new bow and I'm going to gift my old one to my buddy who is trying to get into Archery. He is a very successful rifle hunter for Mule Deer and wants to up the challenge."

There wouldn't be used bows if people stop buying new ones. Good job getting a new person into a great sport.
Thanks
 

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