.270 wsm

Cammy

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Jun 25, 2014
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I have owned this rifle for 4 years and love the cartridge but am becoming concerned that it will eventually disappear or become difficult to find. For deer hunting I love the ability to reach out and smack something at 300+ yards and know it is going down.

Been thinking lately that a .308 might be the better choice for an all around rifle due to ammo price and availability.

Thoughts?
 

TimeOnTarget

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I don't forsee the 270wsm going anywhere.

And just about any cartridge can lay something down at 300yds.
 

Rooster52

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Feb 18, 2014
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Keep the 270WSM , It is not going nowhere. Great round.I am thinking on using mine for elk this fall.
 

1_pointer

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I don't forsee the 270wsm going anywhere.

And just about any cartridge can lay something down at 300yds.
This!

If you are really worried about ammo availability, spend a few hundred bucks on a reloading setup. It will easily pay for itself over time. They are still making components for cartridges that haven't been commercially offered in a rifle for a century. Easy way to hedge your bet if you're so inclined.
 

Cammy

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Yes any cartridge can lay something down at 300 yards but not every shooter can make that happen. The .270 WSM flatly gets it done even with a 130 grain bullet.

I have never tracked a deer further than 25 yards using this rifle. (tika t-3 lite). Center punched an Antelope at 325 and saw nothing but hooves in the air as it took him off his feet.

Just worried that this caliber may disappear as there are currently only 2 bullet weights (150 and 130) for the cartridge and some may be dissuaded from using it because of that fact.

As an elk caliber? HELL YES! I passed on a 4-500 yard shot last year on a cow because I just wasn't sure I could get a follow up if I needed it. Had that been 325 I would have been sending lead down range.
 

.280 Remington

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I doubt the 270 WSM is going away any time soon. Its got a decent market following. If you owned, say, a 7mm or .325 WSM, .300 or 7mm RSAUM, or .300 or .338 RCM it would be a different story.

150 and 130 grain bullets are the traditional .270 cal bullets. The 140's are new, but even in the original .270, not all that common in factory loads in comparison to 130's and 150's.
 

Cammy

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Jun 25, 2014
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Thanks for the input. I really was hating the idea that I might have bought something that would go extinct.

About 3 years before I bought the rifle I let a counter guy talk me out of a 300wsm based on availability of ammo. At the time he was referring to the ammo not being at the corner hardware store like .30-06 or .30-.30 ammo. "what if you forgot your ammo at home?" or "had to buy more?" was his argument.

So far I have not had the concern or the issues that kept me from buying before. I absolutely love this gun!

By the way, the rounds per kill for the rifle stands at 1:1 with the longest to date being 325 yards. Not bragging about my abilities, I'm bragging on the cartridge and rifle.
 
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I don't think the "it's not available at the corner hardware/gas station/general store" is a valid argument in 2015. Consider how easy its gotten to source random things in the internet age between google searches, ebay, gunbroker, etc. Internet aside the large outdoor outlets like Cabelas, Bass Pro and Gander Mountain exist pretty much anywhere near the intersection of two interstates or any population center.

Additionally my experience is that smaller western hardware or sporting goods stock small quantities of odd ball calibers than their eastern counterparts because people can and do use more specialty rounds.

The time it takes for a round to go obsolete today you should either have time to either shoot out a barrel, save another $600 for a new gun or pay to have it re barreled to a more common round.
 

jwh525

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Aug 8, 2010
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Dahlonega, Georgia
I was seriously thinking of using my 270wsm for elk this year for the Idaho rifle season. After talking to a buddy who is from Idaho he recommended I bring my 338WinMag. The area we will be hunting seems like it's fairly heavily timbered so I was thinking that the heavier bullet would have a little more "forgiveness" should it "accidentally" hit a limb on it's way. I also love the weight of my Kimber 270WSWM compared to the Weatherby 338. So far I've only killed three whitetail with the 270WSM, not one of them moved except to fall over dead when struck. It's good to read about guys who use it for Elk without issue!
 

Cammy

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I don't think the "it's not available at the corner hardware/gas station/general store" is a valid argument in 2015.
Additionally my experience is that smaller western hardware or sporting goods stock small quantities of odd ball calibers than their eastern counterparts because people can and do use more specialty rounds.
The time it takes for a round to go obsolete today you should either have time to either shoot out a barrel, save another $600 for a new gun or pay to have it re barreled to a more common round.

Agreed! That is why I bought it
Never been absent minded enough to leave my ammo at the house or a lousy enough shot to need more. I cannot say the same for my older brother who is a LOUSY shot LOL!
I have an older -06 that I bought 2nd hand in a pawn shop in South Georgia back in the 80's. Still have it and it shoots fine. Just too heavy to drag through the woods. I am a cheap Bast$%d and though I have the $$$ to buy another rifle just can't bear to part with the cash.:D
 
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