.243 manufacturers, any recommendations?

Don Fischer

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Ever since I first heard of the managed recoil ammo, I was blown away that anyone would buy a rifle that recoiled to much for them simply because they could buy ammo that would turn their 300 mag into a 308 but they still got to have a 300 mag! Of course there's all kinds of things around now to compensate recoil so anyone can shoot the gun. Kill's me when I read about the guy's that want a 5# mountain rifle in some heavy recoil mag cartridge. So he has his 5# rifle, 4-16x scope in case he get's a 500yds shot, 300 magnum of some kind to make that 500 yds shot he'll probably never get and then has to add on special recoil compensation part's so he can shoot the thing. In th end he has a $2000 rifle full of after market products so he can withstand the recoil and see well at 500 yds. Several thousand into it and in reality he has a 7 1/2# 308! Amazing!
 

belshawelk

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I have a Tikka that shoots less than 3/4 groups with I think it’s 95 grain Hornady Superformace. Shots less than 1/2 group at 200 yards with 55 grain VMax load. Light, short barrel and east to handle.
 

Aussie_hunter_JD

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I'm strongly leaning towards the Tikka T3x. It's interesting to see what the collective power of the internet thinks about the Tikka vs others (and in what order). Looks like the Tikkat3x vs the Browning X Bolt is what most folks are having a tough time with.


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Honestly mate if they were made in America they'd be one of the most popular rifles in your country. I'm all for patriotism which Americans seem to have in great supply but those other rifles in my experience aren't the same. I have owned multiple sako's (owner of tikka), I sold all of mine at a point when money was tight but have since bought what I consider is the best value for money rifle around Sako A7, though I had a hard time not going tikka. You're guaranteed MOA otherwise they'll replace it.

I'm not a spokesperson for tikka and really don't care what you decide on. Just giving an opinion from a country that has no bias, we just run what's good.
 

Europe

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mummel,

Disclaimer, I read your first post but not the 5 pages of post's after your original post.

whitetail, 100 yards, dense trees, If you want a bolt then this suggestion is of no use to you, but I would look for a Browning BLR in the 243. there are always some on the used market that are in good condition. Our family loves that rifle and we have owned other calibers as well. They are fun to use, well built and would certainly work in the terrain and wildlife you mentioned. Just a thought sir, if you consider coloring outside the box (-;
 

VikingsGuy

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Honestly mate if they were made in America they'd be one of the most popular rifles in your country. I'm all for patriotism which Americans seem to have in great supply but those other rifles in my experience aren't the same. I have owned multiple sako's (owner of tikka), I sold all of mine at a point when money was tight but have since bought what I consider is the best value for money rifle around Sako A7, though I had a hard time not going tikka. You're guaranteed MOA otherwise they'll replace it.

I'm not a spokesperson for tikka and really don't care what you decide on. Just giving an opinion from a country that has no bias, we just run what's good.
I know for some, it is a "buy American" thing, but for many others the barrier is their stocks - they feel oddly small. I have three of them, but never once fired in a factory stock - all sit in B&C stocks. Love them all. They are also uncommon in small sporting goods stores and big box retailers where many many guns are sold.
 

Aussie_hunter_JD

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I know for some, it is a "buy American" thing, but for many others the barrier is their stocks - they feel oddly small. I have three of them, but never once fired in a factory stock - all sit in B&C stocks. Love them all. They are also uncommon in small sporting goods stores and big box retailers where many many guns are sold.
I've never noticed that but I don't doubt your experience with them. I prefer the sako A7 for a little more money partly because it has a lovely hogue stock with great fit.

Not to derail this thread but I'm always surprised that the A7 isn't more popular. No it's not the same as my 75 or 85 I owned but it's closer to an 85 than a tikka and for almost half the price it's a bloody good gun.
 

Scarey

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Idaho
Thanks for the info. Whats the minimum grain you'd use with a .243 for a big buck?
For my .243 I shoot 100 gr pills and they are lethal for deer. I still think that the 7mm-08 is a better choice for an all around rifle. You can get a 120 gr bullet for varmint size game up to deer size game and I don't think it would kick too much more than the .243 and both are mild recoil rifles. The 7-mm-08 just has alot more energy down range and punches a bit bigger hole with the larger gr bullets. Both are great choices though.
 

GlockZ

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I also live in the Northeast and travel out to Pennsylvania for their rifle hunt, on the really cold days I bring my Savage 111 youth model in 243. With all the extra layers of clothing on for an all day sit, the youth sized stock fits perfectly. As is typical of the NE, most of my shots are well under a 100 yards, but I have had opportunities out to 300 yards. A good bullet between 80 & 95 grains is more than sufficient to knock down any whitetail. Good luck with whatever you choose.
 

TyThur111386

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Jun 5, 2019
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Realistically at those ranges any rifle on the shelf will give you the accuracy required. Im a Rem 700 guy myself. I have a savage 243 and its fine but my rem 700 7mm mag blows it away in consistency producing small tight groups. If it was me i would veer away from a 243. I just don't like the round much in my honest opinion i think its real easy to become under gunned with that round. I would prefer something a little larger with a little more versatility. Maybe a 7mm-08 or 308. Whatever you decide good luck and happy hunting.
 

sharpshooter97

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Don’t look passed a good used rifle either. The first centerfire rifle I bought was a used Ruger M77 in .243, and it shoots pretty well with the right load. Throw a decent 3X9 scope on it and you’re good to go.
 

Tikka06

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While not trying to talk the OP out of a 243, all the 7-08 love on here is pretty justified in my opinion. I love mine. That little model 7 ss with a 2.5-8 leupold is a joy to carry around all day. I’m sure a 243 is probably just as capable but this is Hunt Talk and we love our 7-08’s.
 

slatebuilder

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There are lots of good rifles out there, but a BLR in .243 would be a sweet piece so would a Browning 1885 in 243.

Here’s a good load to start with. 43 grains of 4350 behind a 100 grain nosler partition.
 
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