South Slope Uintas

MulletsN’Muleys

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Aug 20, 2019
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I am doing an Elk hunt on the south slope this year, and would like any info that anyone is willing to share about the herds on the eastern portion. Particularly above Roosevelt. I understand that there is going to be pressure, therefore I will be packing in.
My main concerns would be a rough bull:cow ratio (only because I can’t find one online)(I might be retarded). What are the herd sizes roughly? Are there very many mature bulls? It will be my first Elk hunt so if I have to take a spike I will. I appreciate any feedback.
 

ntodwild

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Dec 21, 2018
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Washington
I Have no info for you on the area but being your first Elk hunt I would tell you not to worry about cow bull ratios or even how many elk there are. Take the first opportunity you have and fill your tag. If this is your "first" elk hunt you will have plenty more elk hunts to worry about antler size or specific numbers. Enjoy the hunt, learn from the experience and take an animal if you get the opportunity. Whatever you do, don't pass up a spike if you love a good elk steak or elk meatloaf. of all the elk I have taken the spikes IMO are the best eating. Good luck and have fun
 

Hoopermat

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Jun 8, 2016
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There will be a lot of pressure down on the roads most people just seem to drive around even in archery season. Look for very tight drainages and they will hold elk because they cool off. Wind is tricky. The bull to cows are not really counted but are very low but there are plenty of elk in there.
Just get away from the roads as far as possible. There are large areas of wilderness and roadless if you can get in there
 

MulletsN’Muleys

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I Have no info for you on the area but being your first Elk hunt I would tell you not to worry about cow bull ratios or even how many elk there are. Take the first opportunity you have and fill your tag. If this is your "first" elk hunt you will have plenty more elk hunts to worry about antler size or specific numbers. Enjoy the hunt, learn from the experience and take an animal if you get the opportunity. Whatever you do, don't pass up a spike if you love a good elk steak or elk meatloaf. of all the elk I have taken the spikes IMO are the best eating. Good luck and have fun
Ntodwild.
Definitely something for me to think about. I’m familiar with the old saying, “Don’t pass up on the first day what you would be happy to have on the last.” And I will be considering that this year for sure. I will have a day before the hunt to get a good look at what is around so I can make that decision. Thanks man.
 

MulletsN’Muleys

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There will be a lot of pressure down on the roads most people just seem to drive around even in archery season. Look for very tight drainages and they will hold elk because they cool off. Wind is tricky. The bull to cows are not really counted but are very low but there are plenty of elk in there.
Just get away from the roads as far as possible. There are large areas of wilderness and roadless if you can get in there
Excellent! Thanks man. Tight drainages, and play the wind. Got it.
 

Hoopermat

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Jun 8, 2016
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Don’t get in a hurry wait for the wind to switch. You will find there will bed towards to top of the drainage and you should be able to approach them from the bottom when the winds shift
I hunt the south slope almost every year that’s what has worked for us.

Good luck
 

LaSportsman

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Feb 5, 2017
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AZ
Learn the thermals on the wind. When the wind switches, you need to be ready to take advantage, not get busted. The wind in the evening when the mountain has warmed up probably won't match the thermals in the morning.
 

MulletsN’Muleys

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Learn the thermals on the wind. When the wind switches, you need to be ready to take advantage, not get busted. The wind in the evening when the mountain has warmed up probably won't match the thermals in the morning.
Thanks for the comment. That brings up a good point. Is it usually true that on a clear morning with no weather systems the thermal winds would move down a mountain side? And then change in late morning when it starts to heat up? Based on your experience is this something that you see?
 

Roughwater

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Sep 11, 2015
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There are Elk on the South slope for sure. Look and LISTEN for them in the evening and early morning. They were still bugling last year on opening day. Assuming you have a bull tag already (since they are sold out) and are willing to take any elk and you plan to hunt the south slope buy a antlerless Elk control tag. They are only 93 dollars but are not good on the whole south slope so know the boundary. It gives you more options and you can actually take 2 Elk if you happen to get that lucky. It's as cheap a cow tag as you will ever find. With only one day to scout burn up the roads while scouting especially early and late in the day but stop often to listen and look, but when you hunt get out off the roads to a mountain top.
 

backcountry_sassn

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Sep 2, 2016
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I wouldn't worry about shooting the first elk you see. Shoot the first elk that gets you excited (cow, calf, or bull). I've hunted the south slopes and the Wasatch Front. Both places I heard "kill the first elk you see", "there will be a ton of pressure", "you won't hear any bugles". All lies in both areas. Only heard a couple bugles while hunting the South Slopes because it was early September, but then when I went to the Wasatch in late September during the extended archery I heard bugles all day. Even with only hearing a few bugles on the South Slopes, I still saw a lot of elk. I didn't see any really big bulls, but had multiple opportunities at cows and spikes. The key there is to not only pack in away from the roads, but also away from the trails. Lots of horse packers in there and a lot of them are like road hunters, they ride the trails looking for elk. If the elk aren't making noise, still hunt the thicker canyons away from the trails. Bottom line is Elk are Elk. They want to stay away from the human pressure, especially if its a post rut rifle tag.
 

MulletsN’Muleys

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There are Elk on the South slope for sure. Look and LISTEN for them in the evening and early morning. They were still bugling last year on opening day. Assuming you have a bull tag already (since they are sold out) and are willing to take any elk and you plan to hunt the south slope buy a antlerless Elk control tag. They are only 93 dollars but are not good on the whole south slope so know the boundary. It gives you more options and you can actually take 2 Elk if you happen to get that lucky. It's as cheap a cow tag as you will ever find. With only one day to scout burn up the roads while scouting especially early and late in the day but stop often to listen and look, but when you hunt get out off the roads to a mountain top.
Thanks man. I didn’t even think about getting a cow tag in addition to my any bull. Makes a better chance for success.
 

MulletsN’Muleys

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I wouldn't worry about shooting the first elk you see. Shoot the first elk that gets you excited (cow, calf, or bull). I've hunted the south slopes and the Wasatch Front. Both places I heard "kill the first elk you see", "there will be a ton of pressure", "you won't hear any bugles". All lies in both areas. Only heard a couple bugles while hunting the South Slopes because it was early September, but then when I went to the Wasatch in late September during the extended archery I heard bugles all day. Even with only hearing a few bugles on the South Slopes, I still saw a lot of elk. I didn't see any really big bulls, but had multiple opportunities at cows and spikes. The key there is to not only pack in away from the roads, but also away from the trails. Lots of horse packers in there and a lot of them are like road hunters, they ride the trails looking for elk. If the elk aren't making noise, still hunt the thicker canyons away from the trails. Bottom line is Elk are Elk. They want to stay away from the human pressure, especially if its a post rut rifle tag.
Thank you. Since you said that you hunted the Wasatch front, have you ever hunted above bountiful? And if so did you ever hear or see elk? I know that there are some big deer in there. But I’ve heard both ways on elk. Yes there is, and no there isn’t any elk there.
 

backcountry_sassn

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Thank you. Since you said that you hunted the Wasatch front, have you ever hunted above bountiful? And if so did you ever hear or see elk? I know that there are some big deer in there. But I’ve heard both ways on elk. Yes there is, and no there isn’t any elk there.
Yep, hunting just behind bountiful. Elk are in there deep. Its no longer part of the extended archery, but when it was, mid to end of September was awesome. I would here bugles most days, and some days they would bugle all day. Lots of big deer in there as well, especially in November. Wish i would have deer hunted it before they removed it from the extended hunt.
 

MulletsN’Muleys

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Yep, hunting just behind bountiful. Elk are in there deep. Its no longer part of the extended archery, but when it was, mid to end of September was awesome. I would here bugles most days, and some days they would bugle all day. Lots of big deer in there as well, especially in November. Wish i would have deer hunted it before they removed it from the extended hunt.
Hell ya. Can’t wait to get into archery man. But that is good to know for sure. I shot my first deer above Farmington 2 years ago. Steep country. Thanks again for the info.
 

utahminer

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Dec 4, 2014
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497
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Colorado
Lots of horse packers in there and a lot of them are like road hunters, they ride the trails looking for elk.

I have hunted the south slope for years that this couldnt not be more true for the area above Roosevelt. I have had SOOOOO many stalks messed up because of idiots on horses in that area. You can sit on a ridge glassing and all of a sudden you will see animals take off, leaving you to wonder what is happening. Listen closely and will hear horse hooves clipping rocks. The animals know when they are coming start to move out of the country. I have hiked in miles and run into people on the south slope. You never mentioned which season you are hunting. Randy's discussion on elk behavior vs calendar and weather is very helpful. If it warm they are high and staying cool.
 

MulletsN’Muleys

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I have hunted the south slope for years that this couldnt not be more true for the area above Roosevelt. I have had SOOOOO many stalks messed up because of idiots on horses in that area. You can sit on a ridge glassing and all of a sudden you will see animals take off, leaving you to wonder what is happening. Listen closely and will hear horse hooves clipping rocks. The animals know when they are coming start to move out of the country. I have hiked in miles and run into people on the south slope. You never mentioned which season you are hunting. Randy's discussion on elk behavior vs calendar and weather is very helpful. If it warm they are high and staying cool.
Good to know. I am hunting rifle season. I have his season info written in my notebook. (Pre-rut, mid-rut, post-rut, etc.) Now if you are on horseback, are they required to stay on the trails? Do they have to hitch up to travel into drainages on foot maybe?
 

utahminer

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Dec 4, 2014
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497
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Colorado
If there is a requirement to stay on the trail no one follows it. Rifle season will be VERY crowded, but it will thin out some as the hunt drags on. Where are you traveling from? Shoot me a PM.
 

INeedhelp1

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May 24, 2021
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4
I wouldn't worry about shooting the first elk you see. Shoot the first elk that gets you excited (cow, calf, or bull). I've hunted the south slopes and the Wasatch Front. Both places I heard "kill the first elk you see", "there will be a ton of pressure", "you won't hear any bugles". All lies in both areas. Only heard a couple bugles while hunting the South Slopes because it was early September, but then when I went to the Wasatch in late September during the extended archery I heard bugles all day. Even with only hearing a few bugles on the South Slopes, I still saw a lot of elk. I didn't see any really big bulls, but had multiple opportunities at cows and spikes. The key there is to not only pack in away from the roads, but also away from the trails. Lots of horse packers in there and a lot of them are like road hunters, they ride the trails looking for elk. If the elk aren't making noise, still hunt the thicker canyons away from the trails. Bottom line is Elk are Elk. They want to stay away from the human pressure, especially if its a post rut rifle tag.
Hey, i am 0 for 2 in the south slope. I hunted up by moon lake. Is there any part of the unit that holds better odds? Like east vs west? I was considering going east toward vernal in hopes of hearing an elk bugal. To lay eyes on one would be better haha. Im planning on the second week of September this year as opening week i think im to early. If you have some pointers, i would be grateful
 

Roughwater

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Sep 11, 2015
Messages
187
I hunted the south slope a few years back. It can get pretty crowded but as always elk can be found if you don't give up. In the past I was able to get a cow tag pretty cheap with the purchase of the Anybull tag. A very large portion of the South slope is or at least was open to also taking a cow with the purchase of a tag. Again it wasn't all that expensive and having the cow tag opened up more opportunity so it seemed more than worth the small extra cost.
 
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